California Spanish Genealogy
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Obituaries

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  • OCHAGO, Augla

  • Los Angeles Times, Mar 18, 1883

    DEATH'S DOINGS

    Augla Ochago, aged 1 year, was buried yesterday at 3 o'clock in the Catholic cemetery.

    Submitted by: Karla Everett


  • OLIVARES, Ysidro

  • Los Angeles Times, Jan 31, 1930

    INGRATITUDE TO UNCLE CHARGED
    Ninety-four-Year-Old El Toro Patriarch Sues
    He Declares Nephew Raised by Him Stole His Ranch
    Complaint Avers Fraud in Wording of Deed

    SANTA ANA, Jan. 30. - Ysidro Olivares, 94-year-old patriarch of El Toro, who ranks among the earliest pioneers of Orange county with his record of eighty years' residence here, has been robbed of the small rancho he has owned for forty-two years, while his nephew, Bene Burnell, has, figuratively, bitten the hand that fed him during orphaned childhood, according to sensational charges of fraud made by the old man in a suit against his nephew, on file today in Superior Court.

    Trusting his nephew to prepare his will for him, the patriarch had no suspicion when he signed the document, which he could not read, he stated.  He had intended willing twenty acres of his fifty-eight-acre ranch to the nephew, but discovered he had signed a deed transferring the entire ranch to Burnell.

    His suit asks that the deed be set aside and declared void, and that title to the ranch be quieted.

    The complaint stated that Olivares had raised Burnell from childhood and sent him through the public schools to receive the education that the old man himself lacked.  The nephew is pictured as matching his education against his uncle's trustful ignorance, to deceive his benefactor and strip him of his possessions.

    Submitted by: Karla Everett


  • OLIVARES, Ysidoro

  • Los Angeles Times, April 8, 1933

    SANTA ANA.  April 7., - Ysidoro Olivares, 107 years of age, a vaquero in the golden days of California, died today at Orange County Hospital.  Until recently he rode his horse daily on his ranch near El Toro.  Olivares had been employed on the Lewis Moulton ranch for seventy years.  Olivares was a prominent figure in the rodeos of seventy-five years ago, being one of the best ropers in Southern California.

    Funeral services will be conducted at Mission San Juan Capistrano tomorrow at 9 a.m.

    Submitted by: Karla Everett

    NOTE:  YSIDORO OLIVARES didn't ride his horse on "his" ranch near El Toro. This would have been the old JOSE SERRANO Rancho. Rancho Canada de Los Alisos granted to SERRANO by Mexican Gov. JUAN B. ALVERADO in 184 & 46.  Old SERRANO Adobe is CA. State Hist. Landmark # 199. JOSE SERRANO marr. PETRA AVILA, (DON JUAN AVILA'S sister), thus my interest in the SERRANO Family.

    YSIDORO OLIVARES could not have worked for LOUIE B. MOULTON for 70 yrs. MOULTON didn't buy DON JUAN
    AVILA'S Rancho El Niquil (Niguel) until late 1870s. Rather believe YSIDORO was a vaquero for DON JUAN AVILA on
    his Rancho El Niquil (Niguel) then stayed on with MOULTON after  he bought our old rancho. The story then seems to be
    YSIDORO OLIVARES went to work for SERRANO Family in  late 1890s - early 1900s. He lived with the SERRANO Family
    until he was very elderly & became ill. Not sure OLIVARES ever marr. or had issue.

    YSIDORO was infact well known for his roping skills &  seemed to attend every rodeo in SO CAL. Wherever there was a rodeo - there was YSIDORO & his lore. What a fun era this must  have  been.

    Submitted by: Rita Avila


  • ORTEGO, Don Miguel Emigdio

  • Los Angeles Times, Sep 30, 1893

    VENTURA COUNTY
    Funeral of Don Miguel Ortega

    The funeral of Don Miguel Emigdio Ortego (sic), one of the oldest residents of Ventura, took place today (Wednesday,) and was largely attended.

    Don Emigdio was born here in 1812 and had spent all the years of his life in this town.  Old-timers remember him as one of the best vaqueros in the State, his dexterity in handling the riata having made him famous.  He left a large family and many friends to mourn his death.

    Submitted by: Karla Everett


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