San Francisco History

Re: San Francisco Medal

Posted by
Dee on March 22, 2001 at 03:22:30:

In Reply to: San Francisco Medal posted by Dee Harrell on March 22, 2001 at 03:20:43:

That is supposed to be Granat Bros.

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Re: San Francisco Medal

Posted by
John Martini on March 22, 2001 at 03:45:39:

In Reply to: San Francisco Medal posted by Dee Harrell on March 22, 2001 at 03:20:43:

I believe what you have is a medal presented to SF soldiers returning from World War I.

During the war, the Army organized a unit of local men up and designated it "363rd Infantry Regiment, 91st Infantry Division." The unit was quickly nicknamed "San Francisco's Own" and saw extensive action in the Meusse-Argonne offensive of 1918. (My great uncle was in the 363rd and died in that battle.)

When the 363rd returned home in 1919 the City hosted a huge parade on Market Street and rally at Civic Center. I think you have a memento presented to one of "San Francisco's Own" at the time of that homecoming.

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1906 Earthquake Cottages

Posted by
Valerie Constable on March 22, 2001 at 04:23:11:

I'm interested in learning more about the 1906 earthquake relief cottages. Can anyone direct me to a good reference source? I'd love to see photos, learn how many were built, etc. I've heard Marcia Muller gives the history in one of her books but I don't know which one. Any help would be great. Thanks!

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Winifred E Harris-Jones

Posted by
Andy Moreton on March 22, 2001 at 06:03:18:


Anyone know anything about Winifred E Harris-Jones, a fashion illustrator who operated out of the Call Building in the 1920s? I'm considering buying a delightful drawing of hers in an internet auction.

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Mayor of San Francisco Hart

Posted by
Susan Karr on March 22, 2001 at 08:37:25:

According to my mother, one of our relatives named Hart
was once a mayor of San Francisco. Does anyone know any
information about this?

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Re: Mayor of San Francisco Hart

Posted by
Julia Christy on March 22, 2001 at 12:54:50:

In Reply to: Mayor of San Francisco Hart posted by Susan Karr on March 22, 2001 at 08:37:25:

Ron has a list of mayors , which can be found at:
http://www.sf50.com/sf/hgmay.htm

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Helgesen's

Posted by
Sheila on March 22, 2001 at 14:26:58:

I recently purchased an old print which has the name:

Helgesen's Picture Framing
345 Sutter St
San Francisco

printed on the backside.

I do not believe they are still in business but was wondering if you knew any history on them. What time period they were in business. Any info would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
Sheila Killian

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fortune cookie history

Posted by
Carina Frantz on March 23, 2001 at 02:47:36:

i recently came across a reference to a "court of historical review" which held a mock hearing in SF in 1983 to resolve the claims between SF and LA to the origin of the fortune cookie. i'd like to find the documents and the judge of that ruling. any info on this court?

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Re: Well, they like to spell backwards :o) (no msg)

Posted by
Diane Toomey on March 23, 2001 at 03:39:30:

In Reply to: Well, they like to spell backwards :o) (no msg) posted by Grant73 on March 22, 2001 at 03:00:10:

Yes, I know it spells "Tamalpais" backwards. However, the club was in San Francisco. Members competed in Track and Boxing (that I know of).

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Re: St Joseph's Hospital

Posted by
Gregg Herken on March 24, 2001 at 13:20:03:

In Reply to: St Joseph's Hospital posted by Gregg Herken on February 20, 2001 at 12:10:43:

Many thanks to those who responded to my question about St. Joseph's hospital. Can you tell me what is currently on the site? [from Alexandria, VA]

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Re: 1906 Earthquake Cottages

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 25, 2001 at 01:52:45:

In Reply to: 1906 Earthquake Cottages posted by Valerie Constable on March 22, 2001 at 04:23:11:

The San Francisco Presidio's Army Museum has two earthquake cottages on display outside.

The California Heritage Digital Image Access Project has some photographs. I did a query with the words 'relief cottage'. The main link is at:

http://www.oac.cdlib.org/dynaweb/ead/calher/

Specific links to a couple of the pictures are:

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/weidner/figures/I0020954A.jpg
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/weidner/figures/I0020956A.jpg

Here are a couple of other sites that have photos:

http://www.webcastro.com/casstar.htm
http://www.sfmuseum.org/1906/photos.html

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Train wreck on the way to San Francisco mint

Posted by
Don Stafford on March 25, 2001 at 15:14:05:

Any one have any info on a train wreck on the way to the San Francisco Mint, from Los Angeles, around late 1800's to early 1900's?

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Court of Historic Review and Appeals

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 26, 2001 at 10:25:37:

In Reply to: fortune cookie history posted by Carina Frantz on March 23, 2001 at 02:47:36:

The mock Court of Historic Review and Appeals was conceived by Bernie Averbuch, of the San Francisco Boosters, in 1975. At least 66 trials were held through 1990, covering such topics as who invented the fortunue cookie, martini, hot dog and chop suey, who owns Alcatraz, whether Mark Twain made the famous "weather" quote, etc. Various general articles were written about the court:

National Law Journal. 9 August 1982.
Americana Magazine. May/June 1983.
San Francisco Business Times. June 22, 1987.

As for the fortune cookie, there was a recap printed in the San Francisco Examiner, October 28, 1983, page B11. Many articles and letters from historians are available on the topic at the San Francisco Main Library History Room.

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Re: Helgesen's

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 26, 2001 at 10:27:31:

In Reply to: Helgesen's posted by Sheila on March 22, 2001 at 14:26:58:

According to the city directories, Nelson R. Helgesen was in the framing/art goods business since 1902. Beginning in 1914, the 345 Sutter was listed. The last listing for him (and the address) was in 1921.

-Ron

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Re: Pacific Gardens

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 26, 2001 at 10:31:19:

In Reply to: Pacific Gardens posted by Jeff Lee on March 18, 2001 at 10:09:40:

Jeff,

I quickly browsed through the city directories from 1850 to 1900 without any luck. If you can narrow down the years, that would be helpful.

-Ron

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Re: Siaplamat Indians

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 26, 2001 at 10:35:18:

In Reply to: Siaplamat Indians posted by Diane Toomey on March 20, 2001 at 07:17:53:

I found in a newspaper index that they ran cross-country races in 1906, 07 and 08. The 1908 article also has pictures! of some of the Siaplamat Indians. They were high-school age runenrs. Unfortunately, it doesn't give the names. Maybe your grandfather is pictured? The issue is The San Francisco Call, 13 September 1908, page 35.

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visitacion Valley historical businesses

Posted by
rmorine on March 27, 2001 at 04:08:11:

Iam working on a report about the changes in business along Leland Ave in Vis Valley. Does anyone know of a good soure of historical business data, such as what type of business was housed in a particular building 60 years ago. Any info or suggestion are appreciated.

R

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Research about Lombard Street in San Francisco

Posted by
Sabrina Lombard on March 28, 2001 at 06:33:46:

I would like to know the origin of Lombard Street since I have the same family name.

Thank you

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Re: Research about Lombard Street in San Francisco

Posted by
Julia Christy on March 28, 2001 at 08:56:15:

In Reply to: Research about Lombard Street in San Francisco posted by Sabrina Lombard on March 28, 2001 at 06:33:46:

Loewenstein's book "Streets of SF" says it was named by Jasper O'Farrell, after a street in Philadelphia, which got its name from London's financial street. The name is originally derived from the Italian moneylenders of Genoa and Florence, the Lombards.

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Furniture Building?

Posted by
Jeremy Sands on March 28, 2001 at 12:11:23:

Dear Ron,
I'm desperately trying to find out what the building on the
corner of sixth street and howard is, you know, the one with the
furiniture hanging out of its many windows and along the ledges. I'd like to know
what it originally was; and when it was originally built, who's idea
was it to pursue such a bizarre art project?, when did it happen?, and why is it abandoned
today? I'd greatly appreciate if you could help me put an end to this
overwhelming curiosity.
Jeremy

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defenestration

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 29, 2001 at 02:29:08:

In Reply to: Furniture Building? posted by Jeremy Sands on March 28, 2001 at 12:11:23:

"On March 9, 1997, hundreds of people came together to celebrate the opening of Brian Goggin's Defenestration installation. Over 30 pieces of furniture and home appliances are welded and rigged to the two sides of a currently-empty 3-story building at 6th and Howard Street in San Francisco."

Source: http://www.defenestration.org

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Re: Siaplamat Indians

Posted by
Diane Toomey on March 29, 2001 at 04:25:21:

In Reply to: Re: Siaplamat Indians posted by Ron Filion on March 26, 2001 at 10:35:18:

As always, thanks. When I get a chance I will go to the library and check it out. What index did you look in? I have a family photo of my grandfather lined up on a street in SF looking like he is about to start a race. Even if he isn't in the photo you found, maybe I can id some of the other runners as being the ones with him.I

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Re: coit tower

Posted by
Carl McDonald on March 30, 2001 at 08:17:26:

In Reply to: coit tower posted by Ron Filion on January 15, 2001 at 04:00:28:

Thank you Mr. Filion, I lived in Sunnyvale/Moffett Field for years in the late '50s and early '60s, and I had seen the Tower of Pisa, and often thought it somewhat alike . .

CGM

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san francisco

Posted by
jamie jensen on March 30, 2001 at 10:35:07:

how did san francisco get its name originally

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Henry Smith - architect

Posted by
Jan C. Nielsen on March 31, 2001 at 00:14:38:

I found a building designed by this 1919 architect, Henry Smith, at 2151 Laguna Street, in Pacific Heights. It's a beautiful three story apartment building that looks like an old mansion. Has anyone heard of Henry Smith?

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Re: san francisco

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 31, 2001 at 05:25:52:

In Reply to: san francisco posted by jamie jensen on March 30, 2001 at 10:35:07:

Sebastian Rodriguez Cermeno landed in Drake's Bay in 1575, claimed the land for Spain, and named it Puerto de San Francisco. When the Spanish explorers discovered the Golden Gate
from land in 1776, they thought it was this Bay and named the area accordingly. A small area of land, located in current downtown San Francisco, was later settled and named Yerba
Buena. Afraid that another city (Benecia) was going to use the by-then popular name of "San Francisco," the name of Yerba Buena was changed in 1847.

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Re: visitacion valley historical businesses

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 31, 2001 at 05:40:26:

In Reply to: visitacion Valley historical businesses posted by rmorine on March 27, 2001 at 04:08:11:

The Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps are a good start. These are available at the SF Main Libary. I would also look for a Vis Valley business directory if they exist. Finally, the SF Dept of Planning has property research info.

I also saw the following organization on the web:
San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association, www.spur.org

-Ron

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