San Francisco History

Re: Beach Blanket Babylon Blvd.??

Posted by
Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 12:55:11:

In Reply to: Beach Blanket Babylon Blvd.?? posted by Melissa on February 14, 2001 at 12:02:03:

According to one source:

"...When Steve Silver, creator of Beach Blanket Babylon, died in 1995, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors simply wanted to do something to honor the man who had brought laughs to so many people..."

http://www.databay.com/eguide/Bay_Area/San_Francisco/North_Beach/Nightlife/


According to a MATIER & ROSS article in the Chronicle (Nov. 19, 1995),

"There's a move in San Francisco to rename North Beach's Green Street -- or at least a part of it -- to Beach Blanket Babylon Boulevard...That's right, the idea is to honor the country's longest-running revue and its founder, Steve Silver, who died recently of AIDS-related complications... With that in mind, Supervisor Angela Alioto has asked the city to come up with a memorial for the show -- such as renaming the street."

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1995/11/19/SC15370.DTL

Club Fugazi might have pictures. Also, there were probably pictures of the event in the newspapers.


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Re: Street name origin(?)

Posted by
Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 13:00:24:

In Reply to: Re: Street name origin(?) posted by Arellano on February 11, 2001 at 09:11:18:

Was probably named after Manuel Ramirez Arellano, one of the first Spanish settlers of San Francisco.

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Re: Abe Ruef

Posted by
carolyn feroben on February 19, 2001 at 13:44:36:

In Reply to: Re: Abe Ruef posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 12:36:59:

Abe Reuf is buried at Eternal Home Cemetery- one of four Jewish Cemeteries in Colma.
Source=City of Souls

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street intersections

Posted by
peggy on February 19, 2001 at 14:56:23:

Hi, can anyone tell me if Kearny Street ever crossed 10th and 11th streets?
Thanks

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Re: street intersections

Posted by
Ron Filion on February 20, 2001 at 02:22:59:

In Reply to: street intersections posted by peggy on February 19, 2001 at 14:56:23:

Kearny intersects near Third street at Market. Although there were also 10th & 11th streets in the Bayview area in the past, those are further away than the 10th & 11th streets downtown.

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Re: Dreamland

Posted by
Diane Toomey on February 20, 2001 at 03:42:45:

In Reply to: Re: Dreamland posted by Joe Thompson on February 13, 2001 at 09:32:45:

Thanks. It would make sense that the spot later become Winterland. I think even as Dreamland it still had an ice rink. I'll try to find a copy of the book.

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St Joseph's Hospital

Posted by
Gregg Herken on February 20, 2001 at 12:10:43:

I'm trying to find out something of the history of St. Joseph's hospital in San Francisco. Does anybody have pictures of the grounds as they would have looked in the mid-1940s? --Gregg Herken

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Louis Glass - indicted for bribery in 1907

Posted by
Jan C. Nielsen on February 21, 2001 at 01:11:08:

I would like to know what happened to Louis Glass, an officer of the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co., and member of the Board of Directors, who was indicted for paying a $50,000 bribe to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1906. Was he convicted? What happened to him?

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Re: St Joseph's Hospital

Posted by
Stefanie Kelly on February 21, 2001 at 07:27:46:

In Reply to: St Joseph's Hospital posted by Gregg Herken on February 20, 2001 at 12:10:43:

Use this link
http://206.14.7.1/cgibin/tramp2.exe/goto/A0pmfqlo.003?screen=photos.html

and look up St. Joseph's Hospital in the SF Public Library Historic Photo Collection database. They may have something there. My understanding is that the hospital was closed down due to an outbreak of a skin disease that could not be controlled easily. My father was born there in 1942 - I'm not clear when it shut down.

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Re: Louis Glass - indicted for bribery in 1907

Posted by
Buzz Davenport on February 21, 2001 at 13:17:53:

In Reply to: Louis Glass - indicted for bribery in 1907 posted by Jan C. Nielsen on February 21, 2001 at 01:11:08:

From "Boss Ruef's San Francisco" by Bean. "Not one of the public utility corporation
executives indicted in the San Francisco graft prosecution went to the penitentiary".
1. Abram Detwiler of Home Telephone Co. hid out till things blew over, eventually
getting a dismissal of all indictments in 1910.

2. Theodore V. Halsey of Pacific States Tel.&Tel. was aquitted in 1910.

3. Louis Glass was convicted and sentenced in 1907 and after a three year
appeal process, the State Supreme Court nullified the conviction.

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Re: John's Rendezvous

Posted by
Brian on February 22, 2001 at 11:02:04:

In Reply to: Re: John's Rendezvous posted by Ron Filion on January 29, 2001 at 11:41:07:

I was lucky enough to meet the original owners son. He is really great person with a big heart! All I know about the restaurant is basically what you know, it was in the 50's and was Italian food, I beleive it was a fairly prominent expensive restaurant too.


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San Francisco Waterfront During the Time of the Gold Rush

Posted by
Kim Scerri on February 23, 2001 at 03:44:47:

My daughter in fourth grade was given a question to research by her teacher. At this time we cannot find a definitive answer and could use some help. The Question "What building, at the time of the gold rush, on San Francisco's waterfront was converted to housing, shops and a hotel?"

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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Re: San Francisco Waterfront During the Time of the Gold Rush

Posted by
Julia Christy on February 23, 2001 at 07:37:29:

In Reply to: San Francisco Waterfront During the Time of the Gold Rush posted by Kim Scerri on February 23, 2001 at 03:44:47:

Probably the most numerous item that SF had to offer in 1850 - empty ships! The few buildings that existed were burned down several times in that time period also. Check Ron's history site for the "buried ships" article.

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Niantic

Posted by
Ron Filion on February 23, 2001 at 08:36:33:

In Reply to: Re: San Francisco Waterfront During the Time of the Gold Rush posted by Julia Christy on February 23, 2001 at 07:37:29:

"...During the height of the gold excitement, there were at least five hundred ships stranded in the harbor, some without even a watchman on board, and none with a crew sufficiently large to work her. Many of these vessels never sailed again. Some rotted away and sank at their moorings. Others were drawn up on the beach and turned into saloons and boardinghouses, remaining in use long after the filling in of the cove had begun and buildings were being constructed around them. One, the clipper ship Niantic, was sunk in shallow water about where Clay and Sansome streets now intersect, and became the foundation of the Niantic Hotel, a famous hostelry of the early days... "

Source: Asbury, Herbert. The Barbary Coast. 1933: New York. Chapter 1.
http://www.sf50.com/sf/hbtbc1.htm


"...At the northwest corner of Clay and Sansome streets was anchored the well-known ship Niantic. ...a fine vessel of one thousand tons, no longer a bouyant ship, surmounted by lofty spars, and
'streamers waving in the wind,' but a tenement anchored in the mud, covered with a shingle roof, sub-divided into stores and offices and painted over with signs and showboards of the various
occupants..."

Source: Eldredge, Zoeth Skinner. The Beginnings of San Francisco. 1912: San Francisco. Chapter 27.
http://www.sf50.com/sf/hbbeg17.htm


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museums

Posted by
Ann Franklin on February 24, 2001 at 03:43:00:

where can i find out what used to be on the sites of present san francisco museums?
Or, specifically about nursing homes (past) that were run by nuns?

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Re: museums

Posted by
Ron Filion on February 25, 2001 at 02:57:52:

In Reply to: museums posted by Ann Franklin on February 24, 2001 at 03:43:00:

Are these two separate questions?

There are many museums in San Francisco. The California Palace of the Legion of Honor was built on an old cemetery; the new Asian Museum, still under construction, in the Civic Center was the old Main Library and was built on the grounds of an old cemetery; and the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park is built on land that was originally sand dunes. That is just three of many.

As for nursing homes run by nuns, that seems to be a reference to Catholic institutions. The San Francisco City Directories would have listings for them. Also, you might want to contact the Roman Catholic Church Archives:

Roman Catholic Church Archives
320 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, CA 94063
(650) 328-6502
Hours: Mon through Fri 10-3:30

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ca. 1939 history of Castro District

Posted by
Tammy on February 25, 2001 at 05:26:55:

interested in learning more about Castro District in the late 30's to early 40's.
I would appreciate any hints on references to get me started.
I am especially interested in what daily life was like for people in the area.
Who migrated to the area?

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san fran's nickname?

Posted by
glenn pierce on February 25, 2001 at 11:00:51:

is it called the golden gate coty? what's san fran's nickname? thanks glenn

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Naming of Harding, Shag, & Blossum Rock in SF Bay

Posted by
Dennis K. Biby on February 25, 2001 at 13:53:26:

Whom or what were these rocks named afer?

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Re: Abe Ruef

Posted by
Jan C. Nielsen on February 28, 2001 at 01:04:12:

In Reply to: Re: Abe Ruef posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 12:36:59:

Just an interesting note: the San Francisco Public Library has one of Ruef's original "attorney" business cards. On it, in pencil, he has written "The courtesy and the insult are alike appreciated." It's dated Sept. 6, 1905.

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the boarding house/steve martin

Posted by
Severn Sandt on February 28, 2001 at 03:27:40:


I'm working on a TV bio of Steve Martin and need articles, ads, and general memorabilia on his appearances at The Boarding House in August 1975. Any suggestions of sources would be appreciated.

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August Jungblut Company Late 1800's

Posted by
Sherman Cunningham on March 01, 2001 at 10:03:30:

I am searching for info on the August Jungblut Company of San Francisco. They were a billiard manufacturing company. I believe they were around approx. 1870-1900. Possibly a little earlier. I would love to have a Bio. This has been tough researching and I would appreciate any help. Thanks

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Re: St Joseph's Hospital

Posted by
Roberto Landazuri on March 01, 2001 at 10:33:38:

In Reply to: St Joseph's Hospital posted by Gregg Herken on February 20, 2001 at 12:10:43:

UCSF Archives & Special Collections has materials on the St. Joseph's Hospital School of Nursing, including some historical publications from the late 40s or 50s. I helped process and describe the collection a few years ago.

Stefanie Kelly's comments are interesting; I hadn't heard the story of the skin disease outbreak that closed the place. I believe the nursing school's last class graduated in the late 60s or early 70s. I know the hospital was still open in 1979, because I worked there briefly.


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Re: August Jungblut Company Late 1800's

Posted by
Julia Christy on March 01, 2001 at 11:24:19:

In Reply to: August Jungblut Company Late 1800's posted by Sherman Cunningham on March 01, 2001 at 10:03:30:

This family has entries listed by Mr. Faulkinbury, on his foreign voter list and newspaper vitals. Find these lists at:
http://feefhs.org/conf/bio/faulkinb.html

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Re: August Jungblut Company Late 1800's

Posted by
sherman cunningham on March 02, 2001 at 02:27:35:

In Reply to: Re: August Jungblut Company Late 1800's posted by Julia Christy on March 01, 2001 at 11:24:19:

Thanks Julia. The url you gave me gets rejected. I was able to find Mr. Faulkinbury's Foreign Born Voters list. Any other suggestions? Again, thank you very much.

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Re: san fran's nickname?

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 04, 2001 at 01:26:48:

In Reply to: san fran's nickname? posted by glenn pierce on February 25, 2001 at 11:00:51:

Well, there are a few nicknames. There is "Frisco", "Fog City", and "Baghdad by the Bay" to name some. I don't know about "Golden Gate City", but it sounds good to me.

-Ron

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Re: san fran's nickname?

Posted by
John Martini on March 04, 2001 at 04:01:24:

In Reply to: Re: san fran's nickname? posted by Ron Filion on March 04, 2001 at 01:26:48:

I've heard that truckers used to call SF "Shaky Town" but now use the nickname "Gay Bay."


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Re: August Jungblut Company Late 1800's

Posted by
carolyn feroben on March 04, 2001 at 07:54:17:

In Reply to: Re: August Jungblut Company Late 1800's posted by sherman cunningham on March 02, 2001 at 02:27:35:


Faulkinbury's Index----
The San Francisco Call Database
Index to Available Years
1869-1893

http://feefhs.org/fdb2/sfcalli.html

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Re: ca. 1939 history of Castro District

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 04, 2001 at 10:26:49:

In Reply to: ca. 1939 history of Castro District posted by Tammy on February 25, 2001 at 05:26:55:

I believed it was called Eureka Valley back then. I haven't seen any books that cover that particular area and time. I did find one article that you might find interesting (with a photo from that period): Pacific, June 1980, "Neighborhoods...", page 10. If you are a local resident, I would highly recommend visiting the California Historical Society's library and the S.F. Main Library History Room. I wonder if there was a neighborhood magazine during that time? Finally, if you haven't already seen it, KQED did a segment on the Castro District and has some information online at http://www.kqed.org/tv/productions/hood/castro/

-Ron

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Re: Naming of Harding, Shag, & Blossum Rock in SF Bay

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 04, 2001 at 10:35:19:

In Reply to: Naming of Harding, Shag, & Blossum Rock in SF Bay posted by Dennis K. Biby on February 25, 2001 at 13:53:26:

Blossom Rock was named after Captain Frederick William Beechey's ship, H.M.S. Blossom. The peak of the rock was blown apart on April 23, 1890.
(source: Bright, William. California Place Names. 1998. 30.)

According to San Francisco Almanac, Harding Rock's 20th century name has an unknown origin. It may have possibly been named after Warren G. Harding, the president who died in San Francisco in 1923.

There are actually two Shag Rocks. One was southeast of Hunter's Point and was blown up on April 30, 1900. Shag Rocks (aka Barrel Rocks) lies northwest of Alcatraz. I could not find who these were named after.

(source: Hansen, Gladys. San Francisco Almanac. 1995. 328 and 335.)



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Re: the boarding house/steve martin

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 04, 2001 at 10:51:58:

In Reply to: the boarding house/steve martin posted by Severn Sandt on February 28, 2001 at 03:27:40:

According to news articles, David Allen "started the Boarding House in 1971 at 960 Bush Street, after Troubador North had failed there." Among the famous stars who performed there included Robin Williams, Bette Midler, Dolly Parton, Martin Mull, and Lily Tomlin. Some of the long-run, small-time acts that performed there were the Frisco Follies, a drag show, and Duck's Breath Mystery Theater. The Boarding House has a 300-seat capacity. In 1978, big names such as Steve Martin, Joan Baez, Martin Mull, and Robin Williams held a sold-out benefit at the S.F. Civic Auditorium to raise funds to bankroll a liquor license for the club. According to the Chronicle critic, Joel Selvin, "It was simply the finest club of its kind on the West Coast."

960 Bush has had a long and interesting history. Allen believed it began a church in the beginning. "Such people as Count Basie, Earl (Fatha) Hines, Buddy Greco, Duke Ellington and the Hi-Los played 960 Bush during the 1950s, when it was Fack's. For a brief period in the 1960s, as the Quake, it presented topless dancing in a red velvet 1906 atmosphere...Earlier generations remember it as a home of the San Francisco Repertory Theater, The Bush Street Theater, Barney Gould's Emperor Norton Theater, Hawaiian Gardens, the Balalaika and the Club Kamokila."

The Boarding House was bulldozed on July 14, 1980 to make room for condominiums.

Sources:
San Francisco Chronicle. 17 May 1980. 35
San Francisco Chronicle. 15 July 1980. 12.

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Re: August Jungblut Company Late 1800's

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 04, 2001 at 10:57:58:

In Reply to: August Jungblut Company Late 1800's posted by Sherman Cunningham on March 01, 2001 at 10:03:30:

This is the listing in 1895 San Francisco City Directory:

"Jungblut, August and Co., manufacturers billiard tables and importers cloth, balls, cue tips, etc., 10 Golden Gate."

August Jungblut, the owner, was listed as living at 825 Fillmore with Otto A. Jungblut.

The company was listed as far back as 1874 (and probably further) up to 1906 at 10-12 Tyler (later Golden Gate Avenue). In 1907, after the disaster, it moved to 833 Fillmore. It appeared to have lasted until 1951 or 1952. Otto P. Jungblut was listed as the last proprietor (Otto A.'s son?). Throughout the entire time, it was involved with the billiard business.

-Ron

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Re: St Joseph's Hospital

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 04, 2001 at 11:04:14:

In Reply to: St Joseph's Hospital posted by Gregg Herken on February 20, 2001 at 12:10:43:

According to an article in November 1979, "The hospital was delicensed on September 6, and before it can be relicensed it would have to meet certain standards for life safety. It would also have to be certified by the state licensing office and the city fire marshal..." It appears from the article that there was a glut in the hospital business and St. Joseph's was struggling. There was also a controversy because the state licensing office said the hospital voluntarily canceled its license, but the director said they hadn't. At the same time, earlier in the year, St. Joseph's and Children's Hospital had entered into an agreement that Children's Hospital would lease St. Joseph's facilities, but each other accused the other of breaching the agreement.

Source: San Francisco Chronicle. 22 November 1979. 30.

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Re: Center Street

Posted by
Peter Whiskard on March 05, 2001 at 04:45:29:

In Reply to: Re: Center Street posted by Ron Filion on February 12, 2001 at 10:43:53:

I have just found out that an ancestor of mine called John Center lived in a house near 16th and Shotwell Street. Did Center Street become 16th Street and therefore could it be named after John Center?He was apparently a highly successful entrepreneur and businessman,and a member of the Society of California Pioneers. He began as a fruit and vegetable grower and his Center Gardens were in the Mission District.

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Re: the 14 hills...

Posted by
carolyn feroben on March 05, 2001 at 07:22:49:

In Reply to: the 14 hills... posted by Stefanie Kelly on February 17, 2001 at 19:01:41:

I have also heard of "the 14 hills" but cannot find any references.

The Fourteen Hills-San Francisco State University---
http://mercury.sfsu.edu/~hills/

Proud of (and part of) the vibrant literary heritage of the
west coast and the San Francisco Bay area, Fourteen Hills
is honored to be an active participant in the contemporary
creative community. Fourteen Hills is dedicated to
publishing the most innovative, exciting writers of our
time. In its first four years of publication, the journal has
received quite a bit of recognition. Pieces first published
in Fourteen Hills have won the following awards: snip;;;;

I did send the folks there an email and ask what the Fourteen Hills were- but I did not receive a response-

Good luck, Carolyn

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Carlotta Fountain

Posted by
Duane L. Tucker on March 06, 2001 at 14:57:18:

What is Carlotta's Fountain and where is it located?

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Lotta's Fountain

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 07, 2001 at 03:11:43:

In Reply to: Carlotta Fountain posted by Duane L. Tucker on March 06, 2001 at 14:57:18:

Lotta's Fountain is located at Market and Kearny streets.The fountain was donated to the city in 1875 by Lotta Crabtree, a child performer during the gold rush and later a famous stage star. The fountain survived the 1906 disaster and became a rendevous site for survivors. Every year, on the anniversary of the disaster, April 18, the remaining survivors and friends gather in the early morning hours to mark the event.

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Researching: Hulse Imports of San Francisco

Posted by
Wesley David Wilson on March 07, 2001 at 10:52:26:

I have an item with a label which states: "Hulse Imports of San Francisco".
I would appreciate any information about this company. Thanks in advance
for any information provided!

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Hulse - Bradford Company

Posted by
Julia Christy on March 07, 2001 at 12:36:01:

In Reply to: Researching: Hulse Imports of San Francisco posted by Wesley David Wilson on March 07, 2001 at 10:52:26:

Online city directories for 1901 and 1915 list the Hulse- Bradford Co. , with David A. Hulse, president: Importers and wholesale dealers in carpets, rugs, mattings, uphostery goods, pillows and cushions. With addresses at 986-990 Mission and 481-487 Jessie. By 1933 the company is listed in the phonebook doing business at Fremont & Mission.

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Mr. Hulse in SF

Posted by
Julia Christy on March 07, 2001 at 12:40:17:

In Reply to: Hulse - Bradford Company posted by Julia Christy on March 07, 2001 at 12:36:01:

Looks like Mr. Hulse was in SF for some time, SF Call newspaper has this listing:
Hulse, David Andrew ... married in 1875 to Cocks, Barzillai

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i need a ....

Posted by
michelle clifton on March 09, 2001 at 11:12:19:

if ANYBODY knows a sight for the sanfranciscos mission district email me tonight

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Pfingsthorn, Heyman & Co.?

Posted by Max Pfingsthorn on March 09, 2001 at 22:02:51:

I found an entry in the 1850 City Directory about "Pfingsthorn, Heyman & Co., com. merchants, Sac b K and D". Does anybody know more about them? And what does "Sac b K and D" mean?

Thanks for your help!

Max

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"Sac b K and D"

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 10, 2001 at 11:04:02:

In Reply to: Pfingsthorn, Heyman & Co.? posted by Max Pfingsthorn on March 09, 2001 at 22:02:51:

This was the street location, Sacramento between Kearny and Dupont (now Grant).

-Ron

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Mission District

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 10, 2001 at 11:10:05:

In Reply to: i need a .... posted by michelle clifton on March 09, 2001 at 11:12:19:

Well, a great sight for the Mission District is the Mission Dolores Church. Still beautiful after all these years!

But, you probably meant a web site. Here's a couple. But, also do a search on Yahoo! or Google for many more.

http://www.kqed.org/tv/productions/hood/mission/index.html
http://www.sfmission.com/

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Woolsey Street/San Francisco

Posted by
Fred Woolsey on March 11, 2001 at 05:43:03:

I would like to know for whom this street was named, and when.
Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
Fred

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Edwards Store/Gumps

Posted by
Rick Salvi on March 11, 2001 at 09:43:08:

I have an item that is marked on the back, This Edwards Store original for Gumps San Francisco. I would like to know when this Edwards Store opened (year approx.) the business and what type of business they were in. Also the business relationship with Gumps of S.F.

Thanks


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Bal Tabarin "Most Beutiful Dineing Room In America"

Posted by
Michael on March 12, 2001 at 07:45:02:

I Have An Old Picture frame with my friends great aunt in the back of the frame it says Bal Tabarin "Most Beutiful Dineing Room In America"
San Francisco Rouges Gallery

Date Entered ---------
Behavior -------------
Pat no.1.665.605
I Was Wondering What This Place Was And If This Might Be An Antique
Thx.

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Re: Woolsey Street

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 12, 2001 at 11:02:48:

In Reply to: Woolsey Street/San Francisco posted by Fred Woolsey on March 11, 2001 at 05:43:03:

According to the San Francisco City Directories, this street was listed as far back as 1877. Sometimes it was spelled Wolsey. It was also part of the University Mound Tract, where the University Mound College was located. The street was possibly named after a real estate investor, home owner, or possibly someone connected with the college.

-Ron

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Tenderloin

Posted by
Bob Pearl on March 12, 2001 at 11:35:26:

I have a limousine service and three times in the past month I have had clients ask where the name "Tenderloin" was derived.

I am driving one of the passengers this evening [March 09] and hoped I could give him an answer.

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Re: Tenderloin

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 12, 2001 at 11:38:05:

In Reply to: Tenderloin posted by Bob Pearl on March 12, 2001 at 11:35:26:

An article in the S.F. Examiner, 21 Sep 1977, page 9 states that the Tenderloin was originally a theater district. The origin of the name is as follows: "The name was transplanted from New York City where Police Captain Charles Becker reputedly said, "Now I'll eat tenderloin." when he was assigned to preside over New York's glittery precinct west of Broadway, the theater district."

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Jose Minstrel Troupe

Posted by
Barbara on March 12, 2001 at 14:12:26:

Am seeking any info on the Jose Minstrel Troupe at 1903.
Thank you

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Juvenile Justice

Posted by
Linda Greer on March 13, 2001 at 06:38:47:

I'm looking for information for a research paper on "Juvenile Justice".
The focus of my paper is on Detention Diversion Advocay Program. Please
provide any information. Thank You, Linda Greer

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Agnes Drummond

Posted by
Chris Pechal on March 13, 2001 at 07:38:22:

Hi,

I am trying to locate more information on my great grandmother, Agnes Drummond.
I have a copy of her marriage license that states she was a resident of
? City, County of San Francisco. The ? is indecipherable, but looks like Ma
or Ha, or something like that, it is only two letters so it may be an
abbreviation. The date of her marriage certificate is July 5, 1874. Thanks
for any help you may be able to provide.

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Re: Agnes Drummond

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 13, 2001 at 10:25:10:

In Reply to: Agnes Drummond posted by Chris Pechal on March 13, 2001 at 07:38:22:

The City and County of San Francisco were merged in 1856, and the southern boundary became what it is now (with a few minor changes). Before that, a portion of what is now San Mateo County was part of the old San Francisco County. Is there any possibility the "Ma/Ha" is "Sf"?

-Ron

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Pacific Coast Steamship Company

Posted by
Jan C. Nielsen on March 13, 2001 at 13:31:29:

Has anyone heard of this company? In the 1901 Directory, Goodall and Perkins Co. were listed as its agents. James Farrell, as the President. The interesting thing is that "Perkins" is George Perkins, who was the U.S. Senator that served on the Senate committee investigating the Titanic disaster. I'm wondering if Pacific Coast Steamship Co. had any connection to the owners of the Titanic, i.e., Oceanic Navigation Steamship Co., or International Mercantile Marine Co. (owned and controlled by J.P. Morgan). Anyone have any ideas?

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CW Thomas

Posted by
Mark on March 13, 2001 at 17:18:49:

In the 1860's, in SF, there was a company called CW Thomas. What was it?
Thanks, David

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Sea wall builders for the bridge. Depression days

Posted by
Kelly johnston on March 15, 2001 at 00:07:40:

I would like to know if any one has info on the Sea wall builders for the bridge. Ordoes anyone know where I should look. thank you. If you are going to e-mail me please put bridge in the subject area. thanks

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SF papers online

Posted by
Bill Trinkle on March 15, 2001 at 18:02:09:

Are you aware of the Chronicle or any other SF newspaper, archival editions of which are available for review or searching online, and particularly pre-1975 editions? If so, source? Any efforts being made to make available such information online?

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Re: SF papers online

Posted by
carolyn feroben on March 16, 2001 at 01:05:00:

In Reply to: SF papers online posted by Bill Trinkle on March 15, 2001 at 18:02:09:

This is a wonderful site to read---

The Examiner, by decades, begining in 1900~1990

http://www.examiner.com/reflections/years/1900.html

Have fun, Carolyn

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Monaco Theater Resturant

Posted by
Amy on March 16, 2001 at 02:01:15:

I am interested in finding out about the Monaco Theater Resturant, which was at 560 Pacific Avenue. It was a nightclub, and it was open until the mid 1940s, at least. I'd like to know if the original building is still standing and what, if anything, is housed there now.

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Golden gate Park Aid Station- Stanyan/ Beulah@Kezar pav

Posted by
Glenn Hunt on March 16, 2001 at 04:17:19:

Does anyone have the history, architect , origin, building documentation , materials ,methods of construction? It is currently occupied by RECPARK , natural areas & volunteers groups.

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Mayor James D. Phelan

Posted by
Bill Trinkle on March 16, 2001 at 06:06:30:

Is there a repository for information ( journals, diaries, correspondences, etc.) related to the SF mayoral years of James D. Phelan?

Are there any good biographical or autobiographical works related to Phelan's years as SF Mayor?

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Re: Tenderloin

Posted by
Rob Wilson on March 16, 2001 at 06:16:33:

In Reply to: Re: Tenderloin posted by Ron Filion on March 12, 2001 at 11:38:05:

Ron is right. The lowdown is that the police were paid more to work in that area and so they could afford better cuts of meat than the oficers working in other less challenging areas could.
Rob

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Bosqui Engraving

Posted by
barbara on March 16, 2001 at 07:24:08:

Can anyone provide me with any info on the Bosqui Engraving and printing company on 1619 Fillmore St.
Who owned it? What happened to it?
Thak you

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Calvary Cemetary Records

Posted by
Lyn Livingston on March 17, 2001 at 08:33:34:

Please advise as to how to access Calvary Cemetary Records on an individual reburied in Holy Cross. I was told that the Calvary records are not available at Holy Cross.

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Re: Calvary Cemetery Records

Posted by
Julia Christy on March 17, 2001 at 10:27:58:

In Reply to: Calvary Cemetary Records posted by Lyn Livingston on March 17, 2001 at 08:33:34:

I have requested reburial cards from Holy Cross Cemetery. Due to the nature of the research involving old records, there may be fee involved for the search. It appears that HC wrote new cards when the reburials took place (ex: death in 1880, [re]burial in 1912). However, if the reburial was part of a mass relocation of unclaimed remains, without new plots, I am not sure what their files show - as the old names alone are not in the present computer database. If this person was an arranged reburial, (with family purchasing a new plot) then the name should be in the database. Write a letter explaining who you are looking for and what dates you know of. Some of the early mortuary registers still exist for dates when Calvary was used, and SF Call newspaper may have the death listed to obtain the original obits.

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Re: Mayor James D. Phelan

Posted by
Jan C. Nielsen on March 17, 2001 at 10:49:28:

In Reply to: Mayor James D. Phelan posted by Bill Trinkle on March 16, 2001 at 06:06:30:

There's photo albums of his at the California On Line Photograph exhibit (at the Bancroft Library site, see "Links"). Also, the San Francisco Public Library has a lot on him. So to the History Collection on the 6th floor, at the Civic Center branch. Good luck.

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Barbary Coast

Posted by
Dave Spurlock on March 17, 2001 at 13:06:02:

Where is the origin of the term "Barbary" and how does it relate to Barbary Coast?

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ship travel

Posted by
michael smith on March 17, 2001 at 17:48:53:

I am trying to find out information regarding traveling from San Francisco to Victoria in 1878 by ship. What line, what ship, passenger lists?

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Re: ship travel

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 03:12:11:

In Reply to: ship travel posted by michael smith on March 17, 2001 at 17:48:53:

I would highly recommend the J. Porter Library for any San Francisco maritime history. They also take inquiries via the web.

http://www.nps.gov/safr/local/lib/libtop.html

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origin of the term "Barbary"

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 03:21:51:

In Reply to: Barbary Coast posted by Dave Spurlock on March 17, 2001 at 13:06:02:

San Francisco's Barbary Coast was named after the Barbary Coast of Africa.

According to DiscoverySchool.com:

"The terms Barbary and Berber, the name of the people who make up a large part of the north African population, come from the Latin word barbari. Barbari was the name given in Roman times to peoples who lived at the fringes of the Roman Empire."


http://school.discovery.com/homeworkhelp/worldbook/atozhistory/b/046160.html

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Re: Edwards Store/Gumps

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 03:24:35:

In Reply to: Edwards Store/Gumps posted by Rick Salvi on March 11, 2001 at 09:43:08:

I did a brief search of the San Francisco City Directories. Although I found a number of Edwards Co.'s, I didn't see an Edwards Store. Though, it may have been a dba (doing-business-as). You may want to do an extensive search of the directories or contact Gumps directly (www.gumps.com).

-Ron

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Re: Pfingsthorn, Heyman & Co.?

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 03:33:46:

In Reply to: Pfingsthorn, Heyman & Co.? posted by Max Pfingsthorn on March 09, 2001 at 22:02:51:

I checked the 1852, 53 and 54 directories and they are not listed.

-Ron

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Crowley Marine

Posted by
Alisa Judd on March 18, 2001 at 07:04:59:

Any idea where the early records for Crowley Marine might be? I called the company last summer and they didn't know. My great grandfather worked for Crowley but not sure when exactly.

Also, can you tell me where the SF Directories are located for 1896 and later?

Thanks,
Lisa

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Re: Bal Tabarin

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 09:07:23:

In Reply to: Bal Tabarin "Most Beutiful Dineing Room In America" posted by Michael on March 12, 2001 at 07:45:02:

According to Don Martinich and Bill Roddy, the Bal Tabarin "was opened in 1930 by Frank Martinelli and was located at Chestnut and Columbus in North Beach," and in the late 1940s it was owned by Tom Gerun. It was a popular place for Big Bands.

http://www.greenspun.com/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg.tcl?msg_id=002isS

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Re: Bosqui Engraving

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 09:12:00:

In Reply to: Bosqui Engraving posted by barbara on March 16, 2001 at 07:24:08:

Edward Bosqui (1832-1917) was a noted San Francisco printer and lithographer. His son Edward L. Bosqui also became a printer. As I browsed the city directories, I noticed their businesses were located at a number of different locations. An exhaustive search may pinpoint the years it was on Fillmore.

-Ron

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Re: CW Thomas

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 09:12:58:

In Reply to: CW Thomas posted by Mark on March 13, 2001 at 17:18:49:

In the October 1863 Langley San Francisco Directory was the following listing:

Thomas, Charles W., planing and sawmill, 22 and 24 California.

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Re: SF papers online

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 09:16:36:

In Reply to: SF papers online posted by Bill Trinkle on March 15, 2001 at 18:02:09:

I don't believe there are any pre-1975 Chronicle editions online or any plans to do so. I couldn't imagine that they would think there would be a profitable market for doing so.

-Ron

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Re: Sea wall builders for the bridge. Depression days

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 09:18:14:

In Reply to: Sea wall builders for the bridge. Depression days posted by Kelly johnston on March 15, 2001 at 00:07:40:

One excellent source are the local newspapers leading up to and during the construction of the Golden Gate and Bay Bridges. There is a newspaper index available at the S.F. Main Library that covers those years. Though, I didn't any specific to the sea walls.

-Ron

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S.F. City Directories

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 09:21:47:

In Reply to: Crowley Marine posted by Alisa Judd on March 18, 2001 at 07:04:59:

A number of libraries have copies of the city directories. A good listing of them is at: http://www.sfo.com/~timandpamwolf/sfdirect.htm

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Re: Jose Minstrel Troupe

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 09:23:37:

In Reply to: Jose Minstrel Troupe posted by Barbara on March 12, 2001 at 14:12:26:

You might want to contact the San Francisco Performing Arts Library and Museum. Their web site is at: http://www.sfpalm.org/

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Re: Juvenile Justice

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 09:26:46:

In Reply to: Juvenile Justice posted by Linda Greer on March 13, 2001 at 06:38:47:

An excellent source would be the local San Francisco newspapers. There are indexes that cover multiple years. The 1904-1949 index listed many interesting and possibly relevant articles under "Juvenile Court" and "Juvenile delinquency."

-Ron

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Pacific Gardens

Posted by
Jeff Lee on March 18, 2001 at 10:09:40:

Looking for any info on my gggrandfathers business called Pacific Garden(s)

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Re: ship travel

Posted by
Jan C. Nielsen on March 18, 2001 at 10:57:52:

In Reply to: Re: ship travel posted by Ron Filion on March 18, 2001 at 03:12:11:

The Pacific Coast Steamship Company had ships going to Victoria, at that time. The steamship line was run by George C. Perkins, who became California's Governor in 1879.

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Lake Merced in 1854

Posted by
Sue Payne on March 18, 2001 at 11:38:34:

What can you tell me about Lake Merced in 1854? I am reading a diary that tells about public excursions to a lake, and a Lake House. I assume this is Lake Merced. (The party leaves from Mission Dolores, travels "good road."

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Re: Mayor James D. Phelan

Posted by
carolyn feroben on March 19, 2001 at 01:51:49:

In Reply to: Mayor James D. Phelan posted by Bill Trinkle on March 16, 2001 at 06:06:30:


Villa Montalvo Center-
PHELAN Library
15400 Montalvo Road, Saratoga 95070
Mailing Address-
POBox 158,
Saratoga, CA
95071-0158
tel 408-741-3421 or 408-867-1904
Open by Appointment only=
Almost entirely a book collection, but some manuscripts and personal papers.
HOLDINGS- Materials on the life and times of James D PHELAN

Good hunting, Carolyn

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560 Pacific

Posted by
Ron Filion on March 19, 2001 at 10:46:54:

In Reply to: Monaco Theater Resturant posted by Amy on March 16, 2001 at 02:01:15:

The building is located within the Jackson Square Historic District. I believe the building that is there now was probably also there in the 1940s. Currently, it's occupied by "Bentley," who appear to be designers.

-Ron

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Siaplamat Indians

Posted by
Diane Toomey on March 20, 2001 at 07:17:53:

Anyone know anything about an Athletic club in SF called the "Siaplamat Indians." My grandfather was a member (c. 1908).

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Re: Mayor James D. Phelan

Posted by
Bill Trinkle on March 20, 2001 at 17:15:48:

In Reply to: Mayor James D. Phelan posted by Bill Trinkle on March 16, 2001 at 06:06:30:

Partially answered my own question in the interim --- the Bancroft Library has 131 boxes, 29 cartons, 104 volumes of correspondence, diaries, speeches, statements, writings, legal and financial papers, scrapbooks and photographs found this in Library of Congress Guide to Research Collections. Thanks for the help though.

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alcatraz history

Posted by
scott brody on March 21, 2001 at 03:46:45:

Who actually owned Alcatraz Island prior to the U.S.? How did the U.S. acquire possession?
Has any private entity ever attempted to purchase or somehow aquire ownership?

This is research for a movie. Thanks.

Scott Brody

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Re: alcatraz history

Posted by
John Martini on March 21, 2001 at 07:55:44:

In Reply to: alcatraz history posted by scott brody on March 21, 2001 at 03:46:45:

The first Europeans to stake a claim to Alcatraz were the Spanish, who simply considered everything in Alta California to be their possession. The island was never granted to any single individual under the years of Spanish rule (1776-1822).

In the mid-1840s, while California was part of Mexico, a man named Julian Workman petitioned the last Mexican governor for a land grant to Alcatraz. The governor, Pio Pico, apparently issued Workman the grant with the provision that he (Workman) erect a lighthouse on the island as soon as possible. Shortly afterwards, however, Workman apparently transferred title to the island to a private firm just as the U.S. conquered California.

At this point, John C. Fremont may have tried to purchase the island for the United States for $5,000, but it's not clear if he ever paid anyone or even had the authority to do so. Besides, since Julian Workman had never built the required lighthouse on Alcatraz, his grant was considered void.

Since there were no legal claims in the way, the U.S. simply assumed control of Alcatraz along with all the other publicly held Mexican lands in California. The legal authority for the U.S. government's claim is considered to be the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which ended the Mexican War in January 1848.


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Re: alcatraz history

Posted by
Scott Brody on March 21, 2001 at 09:10:24:

In Reply to: Re: alcatraz history posted by John Martini on March 21, 2001 at 07:55:44:

Thanks very much. You have aided my research considerably.

Scott

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Re: the 14 hills...

Posted by
carolyn feroben on March 21, 2001 at 09:16:19:

In Reply to: the 14 hills... posted by Stefanie Kelly on February 17, 2001 at 19:01:41:

According to a San Francisco Chronicle article dated 09 May 1941, the 14
hills are:

Telegraph Hill
Nob Hill
Russian Hill
Pacific Heights
Lone Mountain
Buena Vista Hill
Mt. Olympus
Potrero Hill
Bernal Heights
Castro Street Hill
Twin Peaks
Mt. Sutro
Mt. Davidson
Sutro Heights


Carolyn

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Well, they like to spell backwards :o) (no msg)

Posted by Grant73 on March 22, 2001 at 03:00:10:

In Reply to: Siaplamat Indians posted by Diane Toomey on March 20, 2001 at 07:17:53:

+

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San Francisco Medal

Posted by
Dee Harrell on March 22, 2001 at 03:20:43:

My grandfather had a medal with his name etch on it. It said, "San Francisco to her Warrior Sons 1919" The medal was made by Grant Bros.
Can anyone tell me more about this medal? Why it was issued?

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