San Francisco History

Levi Strauss

Posted by Lisa on January 27, 2001 at 06:45:14:

 How much did Strauss's "waist-overalls" sell for during the Gold Rush?

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the flood building

Posted by Liana Boles on January 27, 2001 at 08:40:51:

 if anyone has any historical informaton about the flood building please email me asap
thanks bye
 

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Re: 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition

Posted by Joe Thompson on January 27, 2001 at 09:21:18:

 In Reply to: 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition posted by Robert Girling on January 27, 2001 at 06:08:46:

 Have you tried this website?
http://www.ggie.com/

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21 Transfers

Posted by Cleyer Westingham on January 27, 2001 at 11:14:00:

 Do they still work, or is there some kind of statute of limitations?

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Re: the flood building

Posted by Julia Christy on January 28, 2001 at 03:02:50:

 In Reply to: the flood building posted by Liana Boles on January 27, 2001 at 08:40:51:

 Would this be the same building noted in the query for Mayor's house ? For more information on the building and club check out http://www.tribune-review.com/features/sfnh0622.html

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Re: Levi Strauss

Posted by Ron Filion on January 28, 2001 at 05:38:41:

 In Reply to: Levi Strauss posted by Lisa on January 27, 2001 at 06:45:14:

 Well, according to Levi Strauss & Co.'s website, he didn't arrive in San Francisco until after the first big gold rush.

Levi Strauss was a wholesale dry goods merchant beginning with his arrival in San Francisco in 1853. He sold the common dry goods products, including clothing whose manufacturers are unfortunately unknown to us. Levi worked hard, and acquired a reputation for quality products over the next two decades. In 1872 he got a letter from tailor Jacob Davis, who had been making riveted clothing for the miners in the Reno area. He wanted to patent the idea, but didn't have the money he needed to file the papers. So he wrote to Levi, saying that if he would pay for the application, the two men could make riveted clothing and, as Davis put it in his letter, "make a very large amount of money." Well, Levi knew a good business opportunity when he saw one, and in 1873 he and Davis received a patent for an "Improvement in Fastening Pocket-Openings."

As soon as the two men got their manufacturing facility under way, they began to make copper riveted "waist overalls" (which is the old name for jeans)...

Source: http://www.levistrauss.com/about/denim.html

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Re: oyster girls and oyster saloons

Posted by Ron Filion on January 28, 2001 at 07:07:48:

 In Reply to: oyster girls and oyster saloons posted by Sarah Adams on January 10, 2001 at 10:15:12:

 I've posted the following article from 1909 on the popularity of oysters in San Francisco:

http://www.sf50.com/sf/hgoe25.htm

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Discover Bookshop - mid 60s?

Posted by flavor32 on January 29, 2001 at 09:38:46:

 I read that Richard Farina died in 1966 en route to a bookshop called Discover.

Does anyone know how I could find out where that bookstore was located?

Thanks in advance...
 
 

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Re: Discovery Bookshop - mid 60s?

Posted by Ron Filion on January 29, 2001 at 11:31:29:

 In Reply to: Discover Bookshop - mid 60s? posted by flavor32 on January 29, 2001 at 09:38:46:

 According to the 1966 San Francisco phone book, there was a "Discovery Bookshop" at 245 Columbus Avenue.

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Re: Anderson & Crisotfani Shipyards

Posted by Ron Filion on January 29, 2001 at 11:33:44:

 In Reply to: Anderson & Crisotfani Shipyards posted by Matt on January 26, 2001 at 07:26:40:

 According to the 1941 San Francisco directory, they were at Innes Ave. and Griffith.

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Re: Origin of Minna street name

Posted by Ron Filion on January 29, 2001 at 11:37:34:

 In Reply to: Origin of Minna street name posted by Steve Drew on January 26, 2001 at 03:30:33:

 Most S.F. street name books would just say it was named after an early pioneer. One source (Ray's Notes) at the S.F. Public Library History Room says it was named after Minna Quilfelt. It was probably named in 1849 or 1850.

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Re: first Kaiser hospital in San Francisco

Posted by Ron Filion on January 29, 2001 at 11:40:04:

 In Reply to: first Kaiser hospital in San Francisco posted by Ross on January 24, 2001 at 11:07:37:

 According to the San Francisco city directories, the Permanente Harbor Hospital was located at 331 Pennsylvania. It only appeared until 1954. In the sixties (and possibly earlier) it became a convalescent hospital (early 60s-Price C.H., 70s & 80s-Potrero Hill C.H., 90s & present-Mission Bay C.H.).

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Re: John's Rendezvous

Posted by Ron Filion on January 29, 2001 at 11:41:07:

 In Reply to: John's Rendezvous posted by L. Crichton on January 22, 2001 at 18:06:42:

 According to the city directories, it appeared in 1952/1953 and disappeared in 1954/55.

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Relief Map

Posted by RICHARD G HUGHES on January 29, 2001 at 14:34:32:

 Sirs: I would like to have info on the map of California that was displayed in the ferry building. I rember going up stairs to look at it while we waited for the ferrys to Okland pier. This was in the 1930s. Thanks Richard Hughes Mt Shasta CA

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Golden Gate Park Merry-Go-Round

Posted by DIRK VALENTINE on January 30, 2001 at 07:10:33:

 Does anyone know the history of the merrygoround at the playground at Goldengate park???

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Re: Discovery Bookshop - mid 60s?

Posted by flavor32 on January 30, 2001 at 07:15:01:

 In Reply to: Re: Discovery Bookshop - mid 60s? posted by Ron Filion on January 29, 2001 at 11:31:29:

 Thanks!!!

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# of Labor Strikes in SF in 1900 and 1906

Posted by Joy Cottrell on January 30, 2001 at 13:49:00:

 I need to know the total number of labor strikes in San Francisco in 1900 and 1906 (or 1905) for research paper.

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Re: # of Labor Strikes in SF in 1900 and 1906

Posted by carolyn feroben on January 31, 2001 at 07:46:31:

 In Reply to: # of Labor Strikes in SF in 1900 and 1906 posted by Joy Cottrell on January 30, 2001 at 13:49:00:

 Have you tried this research center:
Labor Archives & Research Center
(SF Labor Union Records)

San Francisco State University
480 Winston Drive
San Francisco, CA 94132
415-564-4010
email: larc@sfsu.edu

Carolyn

Labor Archives & Research Center (SF Labor Union Records)
San Francisco State University
480 Winston Drive
San Francisco, CA 94132
415-564-4010
email: larc@sfsu.edu

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Center Street

Posted by Iris Warwick on February 01, 2001 at 05:56:08:

 A ancestor of mine had a sheep ranch in San Francisco and had a street named for him. His surname was Center. The 1853 map shows Center Street which later became 16th Street. Would that have been sheep ranch area?

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French Migration to SF 1854

Posted by Ruth Armstrong on February 01, 2001 at 15:21:05:

 Could you please suggest sources for research for a French family who came to SF in 1854? Thank you.

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Here's one good link

Posted by Grant73 on February 02, 2001 at 03:05:57:

 In Reply to: French Migration to SF 1854 posted by Ruth Armstrong on February 01, 2001 at 15:21:05:

 http://www.ancestry.com/library/view/ancmag/808.asp

Title is "The French in Early California."

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Duxbury Reef and Duxbury House

Posted by Helen Williamson on February 02, 2001 at 23:44:22:

 Next summer I am planning a holiday in California and found in the guide books references to "Duxbury Reef". I followed this with a search on a history website and found that in an 1850 Trade Directory, a number of people lived in or near "Duxbury House". I presume that both the reef and house were named after a prominent citizen by the name of Duxbury.
This is of particular interest to me as I have been researching my family history and established links with the Duxbury family that originated in Lancashire England sometime between 600 and 900 AD.
Please could you provide any information about Mr Duxbury who must have been someone of imporatance in San Francisco in the 1800's.

Thank you
 
 

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Why do they call it SanFrancisco?

Posted by maryam santiago on February 03, 2001 at 01:48:21:

 Why do they call the city san francisco? Or is it saint Francisco?

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Re: Why do they call it SanFrancisco?

Posted by John Martini on February 03, 2001 at 03:27:23:

 In Reply to: Why do they call it SanFrancisco? posted by maryam santiago on February 03, 2001 at 01:48:21:

 Maryam,

"San Francisco" is Spanish for "Saint Francis", the patron saint of the City.

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Re: Duxbury Reef

Posted by Julia Christy on February 03, 2001 at 03:39:08:

 In Reply to: Duxbury Reef and Duxbury House posted by Helen Williamson on February 02, 2001 at 23:44:22:

 Duxbury Reef was named for a run aground ship, "Duxbury", which hit the reef near Bolinas (Marin Co.) in 1850.

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genealogy

Posted by Ron Filion on February 03, 2001 at 10:43:36:

 In Reply to: French Migration to SF 1854 posted by Ruth Armstrong on February 01, 2001 at 15:21:05:

 For general San Francisco genealogy research, look at Pam Storm's excellent site.

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Re: # of Labor Strikes in SF in 1900 and 1906

Posted by Joy Cottrell on February 03, 2001 at 11:47:32:

 In Reply to: Re: # of Labor Strikes in SF in 1900 and 1906 posted by carolyn feroben on January 31, 2001 at 07:46:31:

 Thanks for the suggestion, but I have already tried them. I have also tried UC Berkeley's labor archives, the SFPL California History Room, the California Historical Society and about 5-6 others. I'm beginning to wonder if that info exists. The California History Room found the number of strikes in California for those years, but not specific to San Francisco.

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who was the first person to live in San Francisco?

Posted by Danusia on February 03, 2001 at 14:05:25:

 Who was the first person to live in San Francisco?

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Motorcycle races on the Great Highway before 1949

Posted by Marisa Baldwin on February 03, 2001 at 14:18:46:

 Looking for dates that motorcycle races were held on the Great Highway.
My dad raced Harleys and Indians I know it was before 1949 when he married mother. marisa58@pacbell.net

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German Hospital

Posted by Ron on February 04, 2001 at 19:59:52:

 Looking for any information on the German Hospital in San Francisco in the late 1800's. Any info or reference source would be appreciated.
Ron

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Re: Duxbury Reef

Posted by Helen Williamson on February 04, 2001 at 20:57:31:

 In Reply to: Re: Duxbury Reef posted by Julia Christy on February 03, 2001 at 03:39:08:

 Thanks for the information about Duxbury Reef being named after a ship called the Duxbury. Is there any more information available about the ship such as where it was coming from, where it was going to, who owned it, where they were from and what cargo it was carrying?

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Re: Duxbury Reef

Posted by carolyn feroben on February 05, 2001 at 03:40:28:

 In Reply to: Re: Duxbury Reef posted by Helen Williamson on February 04, 2001 at 20:57:31:

 Here is a tidbit for you-----

http://www.maritimeheritage.org/PassLists/mining.html
Duxbury, (Old Harvard Company of Cambridge), from Boston, February 9,
1849, arrived San Francisco, August 22, 1849 (194 days).
Brierly, Rev. Dr., chaplain
Thornton, Dr., surgeon
Varney or Varina, Captain

What is interesting about the above notation is that Gudde _California Place Names_ states
that the Duxbury was grounded on the reef (now called Duxbury) on August 21, 1849.

And _Historic Spots in California_ Hoover, 1937 referes to this spot as "DUCKSWORTHS Reef", rather
than "Duxbury" when referring to the steamer Lewis which went aground there in 1853-
You can read about the Lewis here:
http://www.coastalpost.com/97/5/6.htm

Carolyn
 
 

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Re: 21 Transfers

Posted by Ron Filion on February 05, 2001 at 04:11:13:

 In Reply to: 21 Transfers posted by Cleyer Westingham on January 27, 2001 at 11:14:00:

 What type of transfers are these? Bus?

-Ron

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Re: Duxbury Reef

Posted by John Martini on February 05, 2001 at 04:19:58:

 In Reply to: Re: Duxbury Reef posted by Helen Williamson on February 04, 2001 at 20:57:31:

 The ultimate source of information on west coast ships and shipping is the J. Porter Shaw Library at the San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park. If you can't pay them a visit in person, they have a web site at http://www.nps.gov/safr/local/lib/libtop.html with options for phoning or FAXing research requests.
 
 

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Re: who was the first person to live in San Francisco?

Posted by Ron Filion on February 05, 2001 at 04:32:30:

 In Reply to: who was the first person to live in San Francisco? posted by Danusia on February 03, 2001 at 14:05:25:

 Well, undoubtedly, it was a native american whose name is lost to history. The earliest known San Francisco burial (and possibly a resident) was a 24-26 year old woman who was discovered during the excavation of the Civic Center BART station in 1969. Her remains were dated to 2950 B.C. (California Geology, 1972)

In 1776, the Spanish colonization party that settled San Francisco included "Lieutenant Moraga with Sergeant Grijalva and sixteen soldiers, two priests, seven colonists, besides servants, arrieros, and vaqueros . . . on the 10th day of August, 1776, was born the first white child in San Francisco to the wife of the soldier De Soto in the camp at the mission." (Eldredge, 1912)

In 1835 or 1836,William A. Richardson received a grant of land in Yerba Buena and erected a tent the same year. Yerba Buena could be considered the "birth spot" of modern San Francisco. Jacob Primer Leese, his first neighbor, erected the first house in Yerba Buena in 1836. (Eldredge, 1912)

Sources:
Buried Human Bones at the 'BART' Site San Francisco. California Geology. September 1972. 208-209.
Eldredge, Zoeth Skinner. The Beginnings of San Francisco. 1912: San Francisco.

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Re: German Hospital

Posted by Ron Filion on February 05, 2001 at 10:55:22:

 In Reply to: German Hospital posted by Ron on February 04, 2001 at 19:59:52:

 The following description was taken from a news article of 1870. At the time, they were considering building a new hospital, but decided to just enlarge the existing structure. They did eventually build a new hospital in 1877/78 at 14th and Noe, and another new one in 1904.

"German General Benevolent Society's Hospital. . .Yesterday afternoon a large number of th leading Germans of this city visited the German General Benevolent Society's Hospital, on Brannan street, between Third and Fourth. . .An addition has been made to the south wing of the building. It is of brick, 80 by 24 feet, three stories high, and cost $16,000. The upper story is devoted to the care and treatment of females. It contains nine rooms, and is capable of accomodating sixteen patients. The building now contains 52 rooms for patients, capable of accomodating about 140 persons. On each floor there are four bath rooms, and every accomodation that can be found in any first-class hospital. . .It was in September, 1853, when a few pure and benevolent persons. . .Mr. Jos. Nic. Rauch, Mr. Adolph Wapler and Mr. Otto Esche. . .fostered in the San Francisco Verein the idea of calling a meeting of all the German societies in the city for the purpose of considering the propriety of establishing a benevolent society. . .On the 7th of January, 1854, the first general meeting was held. . .The first temporary hospital. . .was established on the 1st of May, 1856, on Mission street, near Third, in a wooden bulding. . .In 1857, the accomodations of the Hospital were found to be insufficient. . .and it was concluded to build an addition to the same. . .The Hospital as it stands now [1870]. . .contains fifty-two wards of different capacities, in which. . .have ample accomodation for 140 patients. . ." Source: Daily Alta California. 30 October 1870. 1.

Besides the article above, one may want to take a look at "Brief History of the first three German hospitals in San Francisco," Oakland Tribune. 17 June 1973. Knave section, CM 22. Illustrations.

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One Hundred Years Ago

Posted by Ron Filion on February 05, 2001 at 11:03:01:

 I just posted an interesting list, "One Hundred Years Ago," from 1901:
http://www.sf50.com/sf/hgone.htm

Here's a short list for 2001. Yes, many things are not there. Let's see your list!

One hundred years ago a woman could not take a ride on a spaceship.
She could not go from Washington to San Francisco in a few hours.
She had never seen a nuclear plant.
She could not send an email.
She could not talk on a cellphone.
She had never heard of the miniskirt.
She could not write a book with a word processor.
No matter how innocent she was, she could never be freed because of DNA evidence.
She had never had to fear AIDs.
She had never seen a holograph.
She had never been to a laser show.
She couldn't have made digital pictures or movies.
She had never sent woman-made objects to other planets.
She couldn't detect planets in other star systems.
She had never seen weather fronts from space.
She had never seen a computer laptop.
She had never had an artificial heart or a pacemaker to keep one going.
She could not turn on a television set and see the news from any part of earth.
She could not turn on her computer, connect to the internet, and see famous works of art or read famous books.
She had never heard of LSD or Ecstasy drugs.
She had never took a birth-control pill.
She had never traveled in anything faster than the speed of sound.
She had never sailed through the Panama Canal.
She had never been across the Golden Gate Bridge.

In short, there were several things that she could not do and several things she did not know.

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Re: Ancient Order of Foresters of America...

Posted by Ron Filion on February 05, 2001 at 11:29:59:

 In Reply to: Ancient Order of Foresters of America & companions of the Forest posted by Suzanne BABKIRK- DA ROSA on January 27, 2001 at 02:38:06:

 I found listings for the Ancient Order of Foresters of America in the San Francisco city directories up to 1981. At that time, Dr. Edward Weiss, a dentist, was the permanent secretary. He does not appear in the directories after 1997.

The original English organisation's website is at: http://www.aof.co.uk/

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Re: 21 Transfers

Posted by Cleyer Westingham on February 06, 2001 at 02:43:33:

 In Reply to: Re: 21 Transfers posted by Ron Filion on February 05, 2001 at 04:11:13:

 Any SF teen in the '50s or '60's knew that if adding up the digits in the bus transfer's serial number brought you to a total of "21", earned the bearer alleged romantic rewards.

Anybody ever collect?

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Looking for Info re: an old San Francisco based Company (1900-1940's?)

Posted by L.M. Hedges on February 06, 2001 at 05:45:19:

 I am searching for information on a company called National Syndications, based in San Francisco, possible during 1900's to 1940's, but I am not
certain of the years.

They sold a trademark doll called Winkie Walker.

If you have any information regarding this company or any suggestions on
resources for tracking down their history, I would greatly appreciate
the help.

Thank you

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St. Catherines Home and Training School

Posted by Paul Martin on February 07, 2001 at 00:04:22:

 I'm looking for information on St. Catherine Home and Training School of San Francisco - circa 1910 - A great-aunt was an inmate at the school and I'm interested in finding out what kind of school this was and what she might have been doing there -
 

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Race Track

Posted by George on February 07, 2001 at 03:54:54:

 Does anyone know the name of the race track that was on Urbano Drive? When did it close?

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Street name origin(?)

Posted by Sandy Wilks on February 07, 2001 at 06:58:02:

 What is the origin of Montgomery Street's name?

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Fraternal Building and Loan Company

Posted by Randy Davis on February 07, 2001 at 10:38:53:

 I have an origional, signed certificate issued in 1903 to the Fraternal Building and Loan Company in San Francisco by the State of California. I am interested in knowing if there is a 'descendant' of the Fraternal Building and Loan Company, or any other organization/people who would be interested in this document.

Your assistance is appreciated.

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Re: Street Names

Posted by Julia Christy on February 08, 2001 at 02:24:22:

 In Reply to: Street name origin(?) posted by Sandy Wilks on February 07, 2001 at 06:58:02:

 Please check Ron's article on Street names at:
http://www.sf50.com/sf/hgstr.htm

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Re: Race Track

Posted by George on February 09, 2001 at 04:46:49:

 In Reply to: Race Track posted by George on February 07, 2001 at 03:54:54:

 Found the answer to my question. It was called "Ingleside Racetrack'
1885-1905. If you look at Urbano Drive it is shaped just like a racetrack.

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Captain Voss and the Tilikum

Posted by John Junor on February 09, 2001 at 09:40:30:

 In 1901 Voss set off from Victoria British Columbia on a
near-circumnavigation in a converted native dugout canoe
- the Tilikum. San Francisco was a port of call. I would
like to trace newspaper accounts of his visit.
 

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Re: French Migration to SF 1854

Posted by Judy De Bella on February 11, 2001 at 03:44:59:

 In Reply to: French Migration to SF 1854 posted by Ruth Armstrong on February 01, 2001 at 15:21:05:

 There is a professor from Paris, Annick Foucrier, who is an expert in this field. She has written a book on this subject in French that is currently being translated into English. Who are you looking for???? I am in contact with her by e-mail and she comes to S.F. once a year to continue her researach. I could ask her if she knows anything about your family. Please e-mail me directly.

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Re: Street name origin(?)

Posted by Arellano on February 11, 2001 at 09:11:18:

 In Reply to: Street name origin(?) posted by Sandy Wilks on February 07, 2001 at 06:58:02:

 Can you give me the history in naming a street in Sonestown ARELLANO?

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Henry T. Scott

Posted by Jan Nielsen on February 12, 2001 at 00:19:57:

 Does anyone have any information on this man? He apparently built a large home at 2129 Laguna Street, off Lafayette Park, which is presently 2151 Laguna (not the same house, though). President McKinley stayed there in 1901. That's all I know.

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Re: Henry T. Scott

Posted by Julia Christy on February 12, 2001 at 04:20:48:

 In Reply to: Henry T. Scott posted by Jan Nielsen on February 12, 2001 at 00:19:57:

 According to online 1901 city directory, Henry T. Scott was president and treasurer of Union Iron Works. His home was 2129 Laguna.

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Re: # of Labor Strikes in SF in 1900 and 1906

Posted by Ron Filion on February 12, 2001 at 04:30:55:

 In Reply to: Re: # of Labor Strikes in SF in 1900 and 1906 posted by Joy Cottrell on February 03, 2001 at 11:47:32:

 It appears you've covered most of the better resources. The last solution would be to scan the newspaper headlines of those years and tabulate the strikes.

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Las Palmas Avenue

Posted by Lorinda Mantle (nee Hatton) on February 12, 2001 at 05:07:07:

 I have come across a name and address in San Francisco which I believe to be that of my great grandfather:- Mr Charlie Hatton, 753 Las Palmas Avenue, San Francisco. Family tradition here in Wales has it that he died in the earthquake of 1906 but I have been unable to find his name among the dead nor trace of Las Palmas Avenue. Any suggestions would be very much appreciated.

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Re: Captain Voss and the Tilikum

Posted by Ron Filion on February 12, 2001 at 10:37:15:

 In Reply to: Captain Voss and the Tilikum posted by John Junor on February 09, 2001 at 09:40:30:

 There was an article in the San Francisco Call of 21 May 1901 (page 3). It stated that Captain Voss and Norman Luxton were to leave Vancouver B.C. the next morning in a thirty-eight-foot Indian canoe made of cedar, crossing the Pacific and heading for Sydney, Australia. When and if he was in San Francisco is not mentioned.
 

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Re: St. Catherines Home and Training School

Posted by Ron Filion on February 12, 2001 at 10:39:24:

 In Reply to: St. Catherines Home and Training School posted by Paul Martin on February 07, 2001 at 00:04:22:

 The 1909/10 city directory lists this school under Roman Catholic Chapels (and not under Churches).

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Re: Center Street

Posted by Ron Filion on February 12, 2001 at 10:43:53:

 In Reply to: Center Street posted by Iris Warwick on February 01, 2001 at 05:56:08:

 The Mission District, through which 16th street runs, included farms and cattle ranches, if I remember correctly. I don't see why sheep wouldn't have been there also.

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Re: Golden Gate Park Merry-Go-Round

Posted by Ron Filion on February 12, 2001 at 10:47:42:

 In Reply to: Golden Gate Park Merry-Go-Round posted by DIRK VALENTINE on January 30, 2001 at 07:10:33:

 The current Golden Gate Park merry-go-round/carousel is the third one. It was built in 1912-14 by Herschell-Spillman of New York. Originally, it operated in Lincoln Park, Los Angeles. In 1931, it was moved to Lotus Isle in Portland, Oregon. In 1939, it was part of the Golden Gate International Exposition on Treasure Island. In 1941 it was moved to Golden Gate Park and bought in 1943 for $8,500. In December 1977, the carousel was halted and went into restoration. In June 1984, it was once again in operation. The restoration cost $888,225.

The band organ was built in 1922. The outside structure was built from funds allocated in October 1891 after the Park Commission purchased the first carousel. It was given a facelift in 1993 when the lead paint was pealed off and the plexiglass windows were replaced with clear glass windows.

Sources:
"Ride a Painted Pony." Golden State (magazine). Autumn 1984. 56-57
"The Merry-Go-Roundup." National Carousel Association Quarterly Magazine. June 1977.
San Francisco Chronicle. 6 November 1993 (A19) and 23 July 1984 (4).

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Re: Looking for Info re: an old San Francisco based Company (1900-1940's?)

Posted by Ron Filion on February 12, 2001 at 10:50:23:

 In Reply to: Looking for Info re: an old San Francisco based Company (1900-1940's?) posted by L.M. Hedges on February 06, 2001 at 05:45:19:

 I did a quick check through the city directories and didn't find the company listed. They also weren't mentioned in the newspaper indexes. It's possible that it may have been a branch office.

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movie made on Sutro Heights

Posted by r. mansfield on February 12, 2001 at 11:38:41:

 There was a "very big" movie made on Sutro Heights in the 1940's or early 1950's. I was always told that the fiberglass rocky cliff Sutro Park sits on as well as the stone wall above it as well as some of the structures there are all remaining parts of this movie. What movie was that?
Thank you.
r. mansfield
Genabum@aol.com

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Will and Finck of San Francisco

Posted by Cynthia Collier on February 12, 2001 at 12:17:20:

 I would appreciate any information regarding a company located in S.F. probably in the 19th century that made cutlery. I have an old meat carving set with ivory handles and the company name, "Will and Finck" stamped on each piece. Any information I can find may help me date them.
Thanks,
Cynthia Collier

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Re: Will and Finck of San Francisco

Posted by Julia Christy on February 12, 2001 at 12:32:15:

 In Reply to: Will and Finck of San Francisco posted by Cynthia Collier on February 12, 2001 at 12:17:20:

 See Ron's remarks on this company, from the 2000 Archives: http://www.sf50.com/qaboard/2000/m2000c.htm#273

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Re: Henry T. Scott

Posted by Jan C. Nielsen on February 12, 2001 at 13:29:05:

 In Reply to: Re: Henry T. Scott posted by Julia Christy on February 12, 2001 at 04:20:48:

 Thanks, Julia.

Later on, the 2129 Laguna house was occupied by Dr. Washington Dodge, the San Francisco Assessor, and survivor of the Titanic disaster.

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Re: French Migration to SF 1854

Posted by Annalisa on February 12, 2001 at 16:44:31:

 In Reply to: Re: French Migration to SF 1854 posted by Judy De Bella on February 11, 2001 at 03:44:59:

 My Family came to San Francisco from the port of Le Havre, France. Leon Henri Roger traveled in March or April in 1870. What was the name of his ship? Is there a passenger list available? I have his visa papers, but I would love to learn if he traveled with anyone.

Annalisa Roger

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Spanish Influenza/Treasure Island

Posted by Annalisa on February 12, 2001 at 16:48:04:

 I need information

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Kelly and Leibes Ladies Fashions

Posted by Annalisa on February 12, 2001 at 16:49:55:

 Has anyone heard of or have any information of a clothing store with this name circa 1870's ?

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Trinity Colleges

Posted by Annalisa on February 12, 2001 at 16:57:11:

 Does anyone know anything about the Trinity Colleges in SF circa 1870's - 1910's or later?

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History around 1906

Posted by Judy Enos on February 12, 2001 at 17:01:37:

 I recently came across a number of journals writing about the 1906 earthquake.
I found them in an old trunk and am wondering if they are originals or copies
of someone else's work. How would I know or who would I contact? One of the
stories is about a gentleman by the name of P. Tisserablis.

Thanks,
Judy

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Re: History around 1989

Posted by aaron Williams on February 13, 2001 at 03:20:25:

 In Reply to: History around 1906 posted by Judy Enos on February 12, 2001 at 17:01:37:

 Imfromation om the earth quake

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Re: Kelly and Leibes Ladies Fashions

Posted by Diane Toomey on February 13, 2001 at 04:27:30:

 In Reply to: Kelly and Leibes Ladies Fashions posted by Annalisa on February 12, 2001 at 16:49:55:

 Liebes (I think the spelling is correct) was a well known department store (mostly women's wear) that existed well into the 1960-1970s. It may be a descendant of the firm your are looking for. I'd suggest getting a SF Directory or looking at SF newspaper microfilm (for ads).

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Dreamland

Posted by Diane Toomey on February 13, 2001 at 04:30:35:

 Looking for information on a place called "Dreamland" that may have been a rink of some kind. My grandfather participated in a boxing match there in 1908.

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Royal Soap Company

Posted by Frank H. on February 13, 2001 at 05:24:48:

 I am researching a stock certificate from the "Royal Soap Company" of San Francisco. The president was John Yost, secretary was N.W.(??) Griswold, and the company incorporated on Feb 12, 1879.

Does anybody have any information? Thanks.

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sutro poster by blaisdell

Posted by gianpiero on February 13, 2001 at 08:24:04:

 Some time ago I saw in Italy a poster showing Sutro Baths (Cliff House),I think by Marlyn Blaisdell. I'd like to buy it, but now it's impossible to find it again in Milan, my city.
Who can help me to have it? Thanks
 

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Re: sutro poster by blaisdell

Posted by Jim Smith on February 13, 2001 at 08:54:15:

 In Reply to: sutro poster by blaisdell posted by gianpiero on February 13, 2001 at 08:24:04:

 You can contact marilyn direct via mail at:

Marilyn Blaisdell
P.O. Box 590955
San Francisco, CA 94159
USA

I've written to her and she is very helpful. She does not have e-mail that I am aware of. She also wrote a book on the Sutro Baths as well as books on Playland at the Beach and the Cliff House. I purchased all directly from her. I haven't seen the poster but giver her past efforts, I expect it's worth having. If I learn anything further, I'll let you know.

Good luck!
Jim

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Re: Dreamland

Posted by Joe Thompson on February 13, 2001 at 09:32:45:

 In Reply to: Dreamland posted by Diane Toomey on February 13, 2001 at 04:30:35:

 Look for Jerry Flamm's book "Hometown San Francisco: Sunny Jim, Phat
Willie, & Dave" ($20 at amazon). He has a long chapter on local boxing,
and describes Dreamland in great detail.

Dreamland was at the same location where Winterland was later built.
I think it was Post Street, but I can't remember for sure.
 
 

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San Francisco Movies

Posted by Ron Filion on February 14, 2001 at 07:18:46:

 In Reply to: movie made on Sutro Heights posted by r. mansfield on February 12, 2001 at 11:38:41:

 Scott Trimble has put together an amazing web site on movies in Northern California. The address for those in San Francisco is at:

http://www.norcalmovies.com/SanFrancisco/

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Beach Blanket Babylon Blvd.??

Posted by Melissa on February 14, 2001 at 12:02:03:

 Hi,
When did this name change take place, why, and where can I get pictures of the event (if there was one)?
Thanks.

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History of San Francisco

Posted by Richard Mundy on February 16, 2001 at 06:16:20:

 What did the people of SF start building in the early 1900s?
What was the purpose for building them?
What are two things about the climate and land that make SF special?
How did the people adjust to the hills?
What natural resources did Native Americans catch in the SF Bay?
 

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Paper that I am doing on San Francisco.......

Posted by Traci on February 17, 2001 at 11:24:14:

 I am in a State and Local Govt. class and we have to write a 4-7 page paper on a city of our choice....mine was San Francisco. I MUST have the following:

 a. A brief history of San Francisco: when it was founded, who founded it.

b. Demographic and geographic details (population, size, location

 c. Details on the charter: the constitution for the city, what kind of governing document does it have, is it a incorporated city

 d. Governmental structure: who is the mayor, does it have a city council and commission

 e. Details of the budget: what is the approx. yearly revenue, how is the money distributed...

f. Any other interesting facts that might arise...
 

I thought that Fishermans Wharf might be interesting but I cant find anything on it. I have searched so many search engine I could spend 5 days going thru link after link........ If anybody can assist me with this information I would greatly appreciate it so much.

Thank you,

Traci
 
 

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Park Merced

Posted by Stefanie Kelly on February 17, 2001 at 18:00:56:

 Am looking for historical information on Park Merced. Any ideas where I can find some - or whether any exists? I plan to check with the main office on site at PM, but any suggestions/leads would be appreciated. Thanks!!!

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former mansion at Clarendon & Twin Peaks

Posted by Stefanie Kelly on February 17, 2001 at 18:14:45:

 anyone have information about the old mansion with the half-circle brick driveway that sat at the corner of Clarendon & Twin Peaks until early-mid 90s(?) before it was demolished and replaced by the three(?) enormous dwellings that now occupy that lot? it was a sort of Spanish Revival, white stucco-ish with a long stairway leading up from the driveway to the front door. i believe the courtyard-situated structure on Mountain Spring (which would have been around the back side of the home i'm referring to) - white-washed brick kind of carriage house dwelling(s) about 2/3 of the way up the hill - was attached to the house in question at one time... i believe the main house sat vacant for some time before it was knocked down in the name of progress (hmph)... it was a grand old structure. thank you (again).

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the 14 hills...

Posted by Stefanie Kelly on February 17, 2001 at 19:01:41:

 what are they? Nob, Forest, Russian, Potrero... ??? :-)

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Re: Paper that I am doing on San Francisco.......

Posted by John Martini on February 18, 2001 at 03:34:24:

 In Reply to: Paper that I am doing on San Francisco....... posted by Traci on February 17, 2001 at 11:24:14:

 Traci,

For info on government, budget, etc., go to the official web site for the City and County of San Francisco at http://www.ci.sf.ca.us/

John

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Abe Ruef

Posted by Buzz Davenport on February 18, 2001 at 12:09:16:

 Does anyone know where Abe Ruef is buried?

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Re: Henry T. Scott

Posted by Jan C. Nielsen on February 19, 2001 at 02:53:09:

 In Reply to: Re: Henry T. Scott posted by Jan C. Nielsen on February 12, 2001 at 13:29:05:

 Henry Scott was also Chairman of the Board of Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Co., in 1906, when that company bribed the San Francsico Board of Supervisors with $50,000. Although Scott was indicted, the boards of his company, and others, were criticized in the 1909 "Report On Causes of Corruption" issued by William Denman.

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Re: Henry T. Scott

Posted by Jan C. Nielsen on February 19, 2001 at 02:54:24:

 In Reply to: Re: Henry T. Scott posted by Jan C. Nielsen on February 19, 2001 at 02:53:09:

 Excuse me, one correction, Scott was not indicted. Board member Louis Glass was.

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Re: History around 1906

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 03:08:52:

 In Reply to: History around 1906 posted by Judy Enos on February 12, 2001 at 17:01:37:

 Well, I presume they don't have an author's name? There have been a number of books written on the 1906 earthquake since the event. I would suggest comparing a few chapters to published books. Even so, it may never have been published. Or they might have been part of a newspaper article or student's thesis. Are the materials handwritten, typed?

There are three libraries that I would visit to follow up: SF Main Library History Room, California Historical Society and the Bancroft Library. They would have the largest collection of books on the earthquake. You might also contact Gladys Hansen at the SF City Museum.

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Re: History around 1989

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 03:10:55:

 In Reply to: Re: History around 1989 posted by aaron Williams on February 13, 2001 at 03:20:25:

 You didn't specify what you wanted to know about the 1989 earthquake. But, there's a good collection of articles from the SF Museum at:

http://www.sfmuseum.org/1906/89.html

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Re: Park Merced

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 03:24:33:

 In Reply to: Park Merced posted by Stefanie Kelly on February 17, 2001 at 18:00:56:

 It appears you are from the Bay Area. The SF Main Library History Room and Newspaper departments are a good place to start. Also, the California Historical Society and Bancroft libraries have a wealth of information about the Bay Area.

On the web a couple of sites among many:
Western Neighborhoods Project: http://www.outsidelands.org/ingleside.html
Journey to the West: http://www.sfcall.com/journey_to_the_west.htm

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History of San Francisco

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 03:34:41:

 In Reply to: History of San Francisco posted by Richard Mundy on February 16, 2001 at 06:16:20:

 These are pretty general questions. Questions 1, 2 & 4 seem to hint at tunnels. Look at the article, "The City's Tunnels," at http://www.sf50.com/sf/hgtun.htm

As for climate and land that make SF special, I would think that because we are surrounded by water on three sides is unique. The weather is generally mild because of the proximity to the ocean. Personally, I find that the clouds are amazing to the point that they look unreal. Someone pointed out that this was probably because they are usually very low in the sky.

-Ron
 
 

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Re: the 14 hills...

Posted by Julia Christy on February 19, 2001 at 05:10:51:

 In Reply to: the 14 hills... posted by Stefanie Kelly on February 17, 2001 at 19:01:41:

 SF Trivia book says there are 43 hills: Alamo Heights, Anza Hill, Bernal Heights, Buena Vista Heights, Candlestick Point, Castro Hill, Cathedral Hill, City College Hill, College Hill, Corma Heights, Dolores Heights, Edgehill Heights, Excelsior Heights, Forest Hill, Gold Mine Hill, Holly Hill, Hunters Point Ridge, Irish Hill, Lafayette Heights, Larsen Peak, Laurel Hill, Lincoln Heights, Lone Mountain, McLaren Ridge, Merced Heights, Mount Davidson, Mount Olympus, Mount St. Joseph, Mount Sutro, Nob Hill, Pacific Heights. Parnassus Heights, Potrero Hill, Presidio Heights, Red Rock Hill, Rincon Hill, Russian Hill, Strawberry Hill, Sutro Heights, Telegraph Hill, Twin Peaks, University Mound, Washington Heights.

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Re: Royal Soap Company

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 11:55:16:

 In Reply to: Royal Soap Company posted by Frank H. on February 13, 2001 at 05:24:48:

 Well, looking at city directories, it doesn't appear they were around long. They only appeared for a couple of years.

San Francisco City Directory, 1879-80 and 1881-82
Royal Soap Factory (of Alameda), W.J. Houston & Co., general agents, 205 Front

Oakland/Alameda City Directory, 1880-81
Royal Soap Co., office 205 Front (SF), works, Woodstock, Alameda Point

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Re: Spanish Influenza/Treasure Island

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 12:02:19:

 In Reply to: Spanish Influenza/Treasure Island posted by Annalisa on February 12, 2001 at 16:48:04:

 There was a major Spanish Influenza epidemic in 1918 that affected San Francisco. But Treasure Island wasn't built until the late 30s. If there was an outbreak, it was probably while the U.S. Navy Base was there. You might try contacting the U.S. Navy Historical Center. Their website address is: http://www.history.navy.mil

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Re: Kelly and Leibes Ladies Fashions

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 12:07:41:

 In Reply to: Kelly and Leibes Ladies Fashions posted by Annalisa on February 12, 2001 at 16:49:55:

 According to the SF city directories, Kelly & Liebes first appeared in 1884:

Kelly & Liebes (Daniel V. Kelly & Philip Liebes) props, Sullivan's Cloak & Suit House, importers & manufacturers of ladies cloaks & suits, 120 Kearny

It appears they bought Thomas Sullivan's company who was conducting business at that location, 120 Kearny, since 1877 (in 1874 Sullivan was a partner of Sullivan & Moorehead.) Kelly & Liebes doesn't appear in the years immediately after the 1906 disaster.

-Ron
 
 

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Re: Las Palmas Avenue

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 12:21:59:

 In Reply to: Las Palmas Avenue posted by Lorinda Mantle (nee Hatton) on February 12, 2001 at 05:07:07:

 Well, there is a Los Palmos Drive near Mt. Davidson. The most authoritative list is Gladys Hansen's "Who Perished" (on the web at http://www.sfmuseum.org/perished/index.html), though no one knows how many people actually perished during the disaster.

As for further research, you should take a look at Pam Storm's excellent genealogy website.

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Re: Fraternal Building and Loan Company

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 12:30:38:

 In Reply to: Fraternal Building and Loan Company posted by Randy Davis on February 07, 2001 at 10:38:53:

 This company was not listed in the 1902, 1903-4 and 1905 San Francisco city directories.

-Ron

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Re: Motorcycle races on the Great Highway before 1949

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 12:34:23:

 In Reply to: Motorcycle races on the Great Highway before 1949 posted by Marisa Baldwin on February 03, 2001 at 14:18:46:

 There were two motorcyle magazines that existed during the 1940s that might have information: Enthusiast (aka Motorcyle Enthusiast) and Motorcyclist. If I remember correctly, the first had info on west coast races.

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Re: Abe Ruef

Posted by Ron Filion on February 19, 2001 at 12:36:59:

 In Reply to: Abe Ruef posted by Buzz Davenport on February 18, 2001 at 12:09:16:

 Well, he died on February 29, 1936 and had his funeral services at Halsted & Co. on Sutter (which still exists). As he was jewish, he was probably buried in one of the jewish cemeteries in Colma.

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