San Francisco History

Contacting Stanley Williams

Posted by
Gibbs AWilliams Ph.D. on January 02, 2001 at 01:07:51:

I heard Stanley Williams (nobel prize nominee - also on Death Row in San Quentin) and would liketo make an E mail contact if possible. Any one know how to go about this so the E mail is likely to reach him?

Thank you for your help Gibbs A. Williams Ph.D. (gibbsonline.com)


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Wetland restoration?

Posted by
John Martini on January 02, 2001 at 04:15:17:

About two weeks ago I caught a story on the evening news about the reclamation of a large wetland area in the South Bay. (There was some nice footage of a backhoe breaking down an old dike and the water flooding into the parched basin.) I'm trying to find the location of this project but can't find anything in the recent newspaper issues.

Any information gladly accepted! (And in advance, the site is definitely NOT the Crissy Field project.)

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Re: Contacting Stanley Williams

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 02, 2001 at 05:51:19:

In Reply to: Contacting Stanley Williams posted by Gibbs AWilliams Ph.D. on January 02, 2001 at 01:07:51:

I would contact San Quentin directly and ask them. Their website is at:

http://www.cdc.state.ca.us/facility/instsq.htm

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stern grove, Trocadero House

Posted by
aaron t grogg on January 04, 2001 at 15:30:24:

i'm getting married at the Trocadero House in Stern Grove and am trying to find historical news of the house. any news?

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Re: stern grove, Trocadero House

Posted by
carolyn feroben on January 07, 2001 at 05:52:20:

In Reply to: stern grove, Trocadero House posted by aaron t grogg on January 04, 2001 at 15:30:24:

Trocadero Was Spot Of Its Time
It was called the Trocadero and it was the "spot" of its time, the rendezvous of the elite.
Cabins were built around the hotel, and they were rented out to those who came there to
spend week-ends. Many an old Spanish barbecue was held there. Many a spark of jealousy
over a beautiful senorita was fanned into flames, and the bullets of one such may still be
seen in the front door and hall stairs. The first man to live in the Trocadero was C.A.
Hooper, a millionaire lumberman and donor of the Hooper Institute to the University of
California. Then in 1903 Adolph Spreckels took it over for a short time. When he gave it up
it was leased to Hiram Cook.

There is much more to read on the history of Trocadero and the Grove at this website:
http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist/stern.html

Best wishes- Carolyn

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Re: stern grove, Trocadero House

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 07, 2001 at 08:27:38:

In Reply to: stern grove, Trocadero House posted by aaron t grogg on January 04, 2001 at 15:30:24:

There are a couple of historical news articles:

"Old Trocadero Rancho Made Playground." San Francisco Chronicle. 5 June 1932. 7.

"'Trocadero' Made History When S.F. Was a Baby." San Francisco Chronicle. 15 July 1940. 24.

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Hahnemann Hospital College

Posted by
Kim Craigen on January 08, 2001 at 02:19:32:

My grandfather went to Hahnemann in 1899. I can't find any record of it in San Francisco anymore. Where can I find out more info on the hospital and what became of the student records? Thanks.

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Medical Schools 1895-1902

Posted by
Jan Wisner on January 08, 2001 at 02:46:42:

Where would a woman have gotten medical training in S.F. during the period 1895-1902? My grandfather's aunt was listed in the city directories for several years as a teacher and principal at Loomis Memorial Chinese Mission School, then suddenly was listed as a physician. I'm not sure how serious her training was or if she ever "practiced". Thanks for your help.

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Re: Hahnemann Hospital College

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 08, 2001 at 09:08:01:

In Reply to: Hahnemann Hospital College posted by Kim Craigen on January 08, 2001 at 02:19:32:

I found a reference that it was sold to University of California in 1919.

Source: San Francisco Chronicle. 30 March 1919. 36.

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Re: Medical Schools 1895-1902

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 08, 2001 at 09:13:13:

In Reply to: Medical Schools 1895-1902 posted by Jan Wisner on January 08, 2001 at 02:46:42:

In the 1900 city directory, there were a number of colleges listed in San Francisco and many of them specifically for medicine. I'm not sure how many had women graduates, but the commencements for some of them were published in the newspapers. If you are local and up for the search, I can tell how you do it.

Some of the colleges in the 1900 directory included:

California College of Osteopathy, 603 Sutter
California Medical College, 1422 Folsom
College of Physicians and Surgeons, 14th bet Valencia and Mission
Cooper Medical College, NE corner of Webster and Sacramento
Hahnemann Hospital College of San Francisco, NE corner of Sacramento and Maple
Medical Dept., University of California, Parnassas near 1st
San Francisco College of Medicine and Surgery, 818 Howard

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Re: Wetland restoration?

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 08, 2001 at 11:07:23:

In Reply to: Wetland restoration? posted by John Martini on January 02, 2001 at 04:15:17:

You might try contacting the following folks. The monitor the media and would have taped the segment:

http://www.mvisionmedia.com

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news articles

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 08, 2001 at 11:08:35:

In Reply to: Re: stern grove, Trocadero House posted by Ron Filion on January 07, 2001 at 08:27:38:

For those who are interested, I've posted these at:

http://www.sf50.com/sf/hgoe24.htm

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trivia question I need answered

Posted by
Kristi Kissel on January 08, 2001 at 12:34:18:

Who is/was a San Francisco Mayor who was born 5/22/1930 in Woodmere, Long Island, NY? He became a Wall Street investment analyst and supported Barry Goldwater for President.He was in Tom O'Horgan's Broadway production of HAIR through his friend Jack McKinley.

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Theft of pennies from S F Mint around 1930's

Posted by
sal on January 08, 2001 at 21:14:25:

I am trying to find out more information regarding a theft done by small children who filled their pockets full of pennies they got at the SF mint then went home. I understand the guard was not paying attention, and they just went in and took them, then went home. The pennies were returned to the mint, and since I have a family member that was one of the boys involved this really does interests me on finding out more details. I would appreciate any leads about how I can find out more.
Thank you

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Well, Harvey Milk was born that date, but...

Posted by Grant73 on January 09, 2001 at 10:15:42:

In Reply to: trivia question I need answered posted by Kristi Kissel on January 08, 2001 at 12:34:18:

I think your trivia question author is confused, because the rest of the data sounds more like Moscone than Milk, plus if Milk was ever mayor then I didn't know. Moscone was born in 1929 I think.

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Re: Medical Schools 1895-1902

Posted by
David on January 10, 2001 at 03:12:23:

In Reply to: Medical Schools 1895-1902 posted by Jan Wisner on January 08, 2001 at 02:46:42:

If she practiced, she should be listed in the American Medical Directory and the California Board of Medical Examiners Directory, and both should tell where she earned her degree.

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Re: Medical Schools 1895-1902

Posted by
David on January 10, 2001 at 03:15:25:

In Reply to: Medical Schools 1895-1902 posted by Jan Wisner on January 08, 2001 at 02:46:42:

and if she died before 1930, she may also be listed in Directory of Deceased American Physicians.

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oyster girls and oyster saloons

Posted by
Sarah Adams on January 10, 2001 at 10:15:12:

I am doing research on oysters and their role in US cuisine and culture. I am particularly interested in oyster girls and the popularity of oyster bars. If you have any information on this topic, I would like to know about it. Thanks.

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49 Cumberland

Posted by
Dennis H. Tiede on January 10, 2001 at 13:56:58:

I understand that John C. Young lived at 49 Cumberland in 1920. Is ther others living in that house at that
time and who owned the house. Was it a home, rooming house or what?
Thank you, Dennis

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815 Hyde Street

Posted by
Janice Obuchowski on January 11, 2001 at 04:46:00:

I'm trying to find out the history of a building at 815 Hyde Street. It is not a historical landmark, but I need to find out when it was built, etc.

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How to Research Your San Francisco Building

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 11, 2001 at 09:31:15:

In Reply to: 815 Hyde Street posted by Janice Obuchowski on January 11, 2001 at 04:46:00:

There is a great outline written by Jean Kortum available on the San Francisco Main Library History Center's website. Some of the City's office addresses are not current, so call
before you go.

The outline is at: [http://206.14.7.53/GENCOLL/building.htm]

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Irish coffee origin in SF

Posted by
Danielle Shaver on January 13, 2001 at 06:57:38:

In San Fran., where they turn the cable cars around, there is an Irish pub where Irish Coffee was supposedly invented.

What is the name of the pub?

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Re: Irish coffee origin in SF

Posted by
John Martini on January 13, 2001 at 09:32:40:

In Reply to: Irish coffee origin in SF posted by Danielle Shaver on January 13, 2001 at 06:57:38:

The Buena Vista Cafe, or "The BV" to regulars.

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Re: Irish coffee origin in SF

Posted by
Carolyn Feroben on January 13, 2001 at 14:56:09:

In Reply to: Irish coffee origin in SF posted by Danielle Shaver on January 13, 2001 at 06:57:38:

The columnist Stanton Delaplane(Chronicle) is credited with introducing the Irish Coffee to the Buena Vista (Bee Vee) when he returned from Ireland in 1952-
the Buena Vista opened sometime in the 1890's.

information from _The Great and Notorious Saloons of San Francisco_, by Jane Chamberlin and Hank Armstrong.

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19th Ave

Posted by
Margaret Kristich on January 14, 2001 at 07:31:02:

Just looked at the excellent resource recently posted of the 1906 Temporary Phone directory. I've been searching for records of my Great Uncles Thomas and Patrick Smith born in Ireland and moved to San Francisco in 1890. There is a Thomas Smith listed in the phone directory at 1340 19th Ave, South. Does anybody know if this would have been considered an Irish neighborhood in the 1890s? Thank you, Margaret Kristich conaught@ix.netcom.com

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coit tower and japan center

Posted by
sharon ader on January 14, 2001 at 10:45:45:

awhile back I did renderings of these areas. do you have any historical info pertaining to the history of such?I would appreciate any thing you can tell me.thank you. ader99@msn.com

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coit tower

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 15, 2001 at 04:00:28:

In Reply to: coit tower and japan center posted by sharon ader on January 14, 2001 at 10:45:45:

Elizabeth Wyche Lillie Hitchcock Coit was the "patron saint of pioneer firemen" in San Francisco. According to a SF Chronicle newsarticle of May 30, 1939:

"When Mrs. Coit died here in July 22, 1929, at the age of 86, she gave practical evidence of her affection for San Francisco. She left one-third of her fortune to the city 'to be expended in an appropriate manner for the purpose of adding to the beauty of the city which I have always loved.'

"For several years after her death, there was question as to the most fitting interpretation of the 'appropriate manner' in which to make the memorial. The executors of her will at last determined to erect a memorial tower in honor of this colorful woman and also a memorial tribute to San Franciscos firemen."

Also many people think the tower appears to be a fire hose and nozzle, it was actually designed from a tower in Italy.


The San Francisco City Museum has a copies of two newsarticles about her:

http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist1/h-coit.html
http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist1/h-coit2.html


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49 Cumblerland-Mckinley Orphanage

Posted by
Dennis H. Tiede on January 15, 2001 at 05:05:24:

In Reply to: 49 Cumberland posted by Dennis H. Tiede on January 10, 2001 at 13:56:58:

In looking for 49 Cumberland in the 1920 census--is this address in District # 108 ???. I beleave my grandmother worked at the orphanage in about 1920, is there something I can look up or go to to find info out??

Thanks, Dennis

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Re: 49 Cumberland

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 15, 2001 at 10:54:49:

In Reply to: 49 Cumberland posted by Dennis H. Tiede on January 10, 2001 at 13:56:58:

According to the 1920 City Directory, John C. Young and his wife, Josephine, were living at that address. According to the Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of 1914-57, it was (still is?) a single-frame dwelling. Unfortunately, I don't know of any criss-cross directories (listing by address instead of name), which would give you any other inhabitants. But, it appears you have already figured out my next suggestion, and that is to search the 1920 directory. As the entries are not listed by street, I would search for his name first, and then determine who else was in the house.

-Ron

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japan center

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 15, 2001 at 10:59:17:

In Reply to: coit tower and japan center posted by sharon ader on January 14, 2001 at 10:45:45:

Japan Center is the result of a city redevelopment project. It opened in February-March 1968. The 100-foot Peace Pagoda was designed by Dr. Yoshiro Tamiguchi, and was built with a $185,000 gift from Japan to the people of the United States.

-Ron

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Re: 19th Ave

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 15, 2001 at 11:38:26:

In Reply to: 19th Ave posted by Margaret Kristich on January 14, 2001 at 07:31:02:

19th Avenue South is now Shafter Avenue, and is in the Bayview district. I don't believe the area was built up that much during the 1890s.

-Ron

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Re: Theft of pennies from S F Mint around 1930's

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 15, 2001 at 11:55:05:

In Reply to: Theft of pennies from S F Mint around 1930's posted by sal on January 08, 2001 at 21:14:25:

I checked through the San Francisco Chronicle newspaper index and didn't find anything. I also checked through the SF Main Library History Room's collection of news articles on the mint, also without any success. The mint, and its museum, has been closed for some time. You might try the California Historical Society or the Bancroft Library. But, unless, there was a newspaper article on the event, I can't imagine you would find any more information. Unless, of course, one of the other boys reads your posting.

-Ron

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Union Transfer Company

Posted by
jake on January 16, 2001 at 09:08:01:

Anybody know anything about this "Union Transfer Company - San Francisco". I've got a steamer trunk with a sticker on it for this company, and i'm looking for more information.

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Re: 19th Ave

Posted by
Judy De Bella on January 16, 2001 at 17:23:16:

In Reply to: 19th Ave posted by Margaret Kristich on January 14, 2001 at 07:31:02:

There WAS a large Irish population in the area. There were many homes owned in the area by the railroad for its employees. The men would go down to the tunnel off 15th Ave South (now Oakdale)to catch the train to get to work. My husband's gr-grandfather lived right near the tunnel & worked for the railroad. There are still several old houses still standing in the area.

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Lone mountain Cemetary

Posted by
Guy E. Walters on January 17, 2001 at 12:50:12:

How do I find the the names of those intered in Lone Mountain Cemetaty?

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UMMMM

Posted by
k. haubelt on January 17, 2001 at 12:56:58:

What is the offical birthday of San Francisco, S.V.P.?

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Re: Lone mountain Cemetary

Posted by
Julia Christy on January 17, 2001 at 14:31:27:

In Reply to: Lone mountain Cemetary posted by Guy E. Walters on January 17, 2001 at 12:50:12:

Read about Lone Mountain Cemetery on Ron's website:
http://www.sf50.com/sf/hcmlon.htm

I'm not sure if Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma has any burial records that far back or not (they DO have records for Calvary Cemetery reburials). The reburials are NOT shown on their database in the office, but must be researched by staff, by hand. And use dates for Lone Mountain preceeds the SF Call newspaper database, presently online. Likewise use dates also preceeds surviving mortuary registers for SF (no index for the earliest volumes either). Sorry...

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Masonic & Laurel Hill Cemetaries

Posted by
ALAN A. HIMMAH on January 17, 2001 at 19:22:23:

Can anyone tell me what happened to the original records regarding the burials in the Masonic and Laurel Hill Cemetaries? What happened to the records of the Martin & Brown Undertaking establishment?

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Re: Masonic & Laurel Hill Cemeteries

Posted by
Julia Christy on January 18, 2001 at 05:59:59:

In Reply to: Masonic & Laurel Hill Cemetaries posted by ALAN A. HIMMAH on January 17, 2001 at 19:22:23:

See Ron's writeups on cemeteries at:
http://www.sf50.com/sf/hcmidx.htm

Many of the Masonic burials were reburied at Woodlawn Cemetery, where they do have them so noted in the files.

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Who was San Francicsco?

Posted by
David Chalimon on January 18, 2001 at 10:04:08:

I'd like to know who was San Francisco, when he lived, what he did.
Thanks
/David

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Re: Who was San Francicsco?

Posted by
John Martini on January 18, 2001 at 14:20:18:

In Reply to: Who was San Francicsco? posted by David Chalimon on January 18, 2001 at 10:04:08:

"San Francisco" is Spanish for Saint Francis.

The City of San Francisco was named after St. Francis of Assis, a Catholic saint and founder of the Franciscan Order. The Franciscans established and operated the missions in Alta California during the 18th and early 19th Century.

I found two web sites with biographies on St. Francis, the first a stupifyingly detailed history at http://216.155.30.68/francis1.htm The other site has a charmingly short and simple biography written by a Taiwanese student. It can be found at http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Tower/3098/wayne.html


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Alcatraz escape history

Posted by
Kevin on January 19, 2001 at 08:31:17:

I am 11 yrs old and I am working on a school science project about the Alcatraz prison escape in 1962. The project is about the probability of the prisoners escaping successfully. I am looking for information about the water temperture and currents at the time of the escape.

I would appreciate any information/links you could give.

Thank you,
Kevin

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San Francisco Bday

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 19, 2001 at 10:50:57:

In Reply to: UMMMM posted by k. haubelt on January 17, 2001 at 12:56:58:

What constitutes the birthday of a city? The first discovery, first temporary structure, first permanent structure, first mass, first official mass, first official dedication, first charter, incorporated, or ? If it's the first Catholic mass, then that was performed on 29 June 1776. But, according to Eldredge, the first formal "service" was on 17 September 1776:

"On the 17th of September, "The anniversary of the impression of the wounds of our father Saint Francis, patron of the presidio and fort," as Father Palou says, they took formal possession of the presidio. Father Palou said mass, blessed the site, and after the elevation and adoration of the Holy Cross, concluded the religious services with the Te Deum. Then Moraga and his officers took formal possession in the name of the sovereign and with discharges of cannon by the San Crlos and the shore batteries, and volleys of musketry from the troops, the city of San Francisco was born."

Source: Eldredge, Zoeth S. The Beginnings of San Francisco. 1912.

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first oyster cocktail

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 19, 2001 at 11:20:45:

In Reply to: oyster girls and oyster saloons posted by Sarah Adams on January 10, 2001 at 10:15:12:

Here is a portion of an article that will eventually be posted:

. . .One fine morning in the late eighties a genial sailor, with three sheets in the wind, came to anchor at [John] Moraghan's stall and asked for a bowl of oysters. The order was unusual, but the mariner flashed a handful of gold, said he was hungry enough to eat a peck of oysters, shells and all, and was ready to pay for the same; but expressed his preference in having the bivalves served without their shells and being permitted to hook them out of a bowl with a spoon.

The City Birthplace of Oyster Cocktail.

Moraghan slopped out a quart of small Californians and the mariner started to consume them. As he swallowed his second spoonful, however, the eyes of the stranger lighted up as his gaze was arrested by the glittery array of condiment bottles along the counter.

"How much extra to mix them in their mulligan?" he asked, pointing to the sauces.

"Nothing extra," said Moraghan. "Help yourself."

The man got hold of the vinegar, the tomato catsup, the horseradish, the tabasco, the Worcestershire sauce and anything else that was handy and dolloped a portion of each and all of them into his dish. The he mopped up the lot and asked for another helping.

A genius less gifted than Moraghan would have merely laughed at the idiosyncracy of a drunken sailor, and given the matter no further thought or reflection. Not so Moraghan.

He noted the obvious sense of satisfaction that glowed on the face of the mariner as he repeated his novel meal, and decided to sample a similar compote himself at the first moment of leisure. He made the experiment and the result enthralled him.

A few days later, an immense new crock appeared among the galaxy of similar vessels behind the counter wherein Moraghan kept the shell-bereft oysters. A label stuck above the new crock announced briefly:

"Oyster Cocktails 10 cents"

Thus the oyster cocktail was born . . .It was not until three of four years later, however, when the Midwinter Fair of 1893 attracted a tremendous influx of visitors to the Golden Gate, that the outer world was brought in direct contact with the lure of the oyster cocktail and succumbed to its blandishments without a struggle. . .

Source: Morphy, Edward. Hotels and Cafes. San Francisco Chronicle. 15 January 1919.

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Belfast Brewing

Posted by
Lena on January 20, 2001 at 09:13:41:

I was wondering if anyone knows of the Dance Hall and Brewery on Union
street(Marina)around 1920's called the Belfast Brewery, they made
root beer/ginger ale. Also was became a dance hall at night.
Please help!

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fomer mayor of s.f.

Posted by spiro on January 21, 2001 at 08:04:13:


what ever happen to the former mayor of san francisco art agnew

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Re: Alcatraz escape history

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 21, 2001 at 08:10:00:

In Reply to: Alcatraz escape history posted by Kevin on January 19, 2001 at 08:31:17:

Kevin, take a look at some of the articles I've posted about the escape. They do mention some of the facts for which you are searching:


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SF resident Harry Gedge 1875

Posted by
Larry Tiscornia on January 22, 2001 at 05:05:51:

I am trying to find any historical information about a
Harry Gedge or Mrs. Harry Gedge who resided on O'Farrell
St. in SF in 1875.
Thanks,
Larry Tiscornia

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Re: SF resident Harry Gedge 1875

Posted by
Larry Tiscornia on January 22, 2001 at 05:14:05:

In Reply to: SF resident Harry Gedge 1875 posted by Larry Tiscornia on January 22, 2001 at 05:05:51:

PS - The date of residence may be as early as 1855.
Thanks,
Larry Tiscornia

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Re: Union Transfer Company

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 22, 2001 at 11:13:29:

In Reply to: Union Transfer Company posted by jake on January 16, 2001 at 09:08:01:

This company appears in the San Francisco City Directories from 1896 to 1924. The 1915 listing was:

Union Transfer Co.
Wm D. O'Kane pres, E S Ciprico v-pres, baggage and freight forwarded, baggage checked at hotels and residences, agents on all trains of S P Co and W P Ry, main office south end of Ferry Bldg, branch offices 884 Market, S P Depot, 3d and Townsend, tel Douglas 83.


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Re: Belfast Brewing

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 22, 2001 at 11:26:40:

In Reply to: Belfast Brewing posted by Lena on January 20, 2001 at 09:13:41:

According to the San Francisco City directories, the "Belfast Ginger Ale Co." first appeared in 1887 at 1815 Union and was owned by Frederick Steimke and one or more of his brothers (John, Richard, William and Henry). The next year it moved to 2768 Octavia where it stayed until 1921. In 1900, the company was listed as owned by Dietrick J. Steimke.

Before 1887, Frederick Steimke had a grocery & liquor store at 1815 Union (and a soda-water manufacturing in 1886) back to 1881. Before that he had his store at the northwest corner of Eddy & Pierce. The other brothers, and probably Frederick at some time, were also partners with the Bruns Brothers, another grocery business, on Mission since at least the 1870s and possibly before. It appears Frederick kept the grocery store going after he moved the ale company. In 1889, the name of the grocery store was "Spring Valley Grocery and Provision Store."

-Ron

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Re: SF resident Harry Gedge 1875

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 22, 2001 at 11:29:49:

In Reply to: SF resident Harry Gedge 1875 posted by Larry Tiscornia on January 22, 2001 at 05:05:51:

They aren't listed in the San Francisco City Directories circa 1875.

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Re: SF resident Harry Gedge 1875

Posted by
carolyn feroben on January 22, 2001 at 13:29:17:

In Reply to: Re: SF resident Harry Gedge 1875 posted by Larry Tiscornia on January 22, 2001 at 05:14:05:

The 1856 Index has a George GEDGE in San Francisco, page 78. The San Francisco
Directory referenced is the COLVILLE's 1856. 1857, San Francisco Directory.

Hope this helps, Carolyn

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John's Rendezvous

Posted by
L. Crichton on January 22, 2001 at 18:06:42:

I would like to know more about the restaurant named John's Rendezvous that
was located at 50 Osgood Place, San Francisco in the 50's.

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Mayor's residence(?) on California Street

Posted by
Debbie Neville on January 24, 2001 at 03:51:25:

Does anyone know the history of the beautiful brown building on California Street right before the intersection where the Fairmont Hotel is?? I grew up in SF and sort of remember it being an exclusive men's club. Think the sign said "Mayor's Residence" when we last drove by. I no longer live in the City..Any clues??
Thanks!
Debbie

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New Mission Theater

Posted by
Pierre Lesbre on January 24, 2001 at 05:40:52:

Thank you for this very useful web resource. I'm a reporter at The Guardsman, City College newspaper and I need your help because there is currently an ongoing controversy about preserving or not the theater. Because CCSF is about to build a new Mission campus on this site and Supe Ammiano and other preservationists are against the architectural project which only includes the marquee of the theater.
my concern is to have more background about the architecture of this building. I would be glad if you could help me!
Thanks

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Re: New Mission Theater

Posted by
Ron Filion on January 24, 2001 at 08:08:30:

In Reply to: New Mission Theater posted by Pierre Lesbre on January 24, 2001 at 05:40:52:

Take a look at Christopher VerPlanck 's reply to an earlier message:

http://www.sf50.com/qaboard/2000/m2000b.htm#138

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Re: fomer mayor of s.f.

Posted by
carolyn feroben on January 24, 2001 at 08:45:45:

In Reply to: fomer mayor of s.f. posted by spiro on January 21, 2001 at 08:04:13:

The former mayor was named Art AGNOS-
he is/was (2000) working for HUD in San Francisco: Regional Administrator for
the United States Department of Housing and Urban Renewal.

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first Kaiser hospital in San Francisco

Posted by
Ross on January 24, 2001 at 11:07:37:

I have read that the first kaiser hospital in SF was in Potrero Hill and was called the Permanente Harbor Hospital (purchased by kaiser in 1948) Does anyone know the address where this building was and if it is still standing?

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Re: Mayor's residence(?) on California Street

Posted by
John Martini on January 24, 2001 at 13:21:01:

In Reply to: Mayor's residence(?) on California Street posted by Debbie Neville on January 24, 2001 at 03:51:25:

You're describing the former Flood Mansion at 1000 Caifornia Street. Constructed before the fire and earthquake as the residence of Comstock millionaire James Flood, it is now occupied by the tres-exclusive, all-male Pacific Union Club. (We're talking BIG dollars here.)

For more information on the building and club check out http://www.tribune-review.com/features/sfnh0622.html


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early source of bricks for building

Posted by
t christensen on January 26, 2001 at 03:26:34:

I am doing some research on early San Francisco in the 1850s. I would like to learn where the city got the bricks for its brick buildings. Can you help?

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Origin of Minna street name

Posted by
Steve Drew on January 26, 2001 at 03:30:33:

Who was Minna Street named after and when?

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Re: early source of bricks for building

Posted by
Julia Christy on January 26, 2001 at 06:26:45:

In Reply to: early source of bricks for building posted by t christensen on January 26, 2001 at 03:26:34:

The lot grant called "Curtiduria" (tannery) was sold to Thomas Dorland by 1849. He used the property to make brick until at least 1854. (according to testimony in land grant hearings, whose records are now at Bancroft Library).

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Anderson & Crisotfani Shipyards

Posted by
Matt on January 26, 2001 at 07:26:40:

Anyone know exactly where in India Basin this company was located?
Thanks

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Ancient Order of Foresters of America & companions of the Forest

Posted by
Suzanne BABKIRK- DA ROSA on January 27, 2001 at 02:38:06:

Does anyone know where records may be kept for the following benevolent organizations in San Francisco area 1889-1906?
Ancient Order of Foresters of America.
and Companions of the Forest (women's branch?)

Thank you
suzanne BABKIRK- DA ROSA
darosa@sonic.net

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1939 Golden Gate International Exposition

Posted by
Robert Girling on January 27, 2001 at 06:08:46:

Would appreciate any information on this subject. Thank you

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