Got Questions? Archive


Cartoon Character

Posted by
tony prohaska on August 30, 2000 at 08:06:33:

My father was raised in S.F. circa 1910 to 1920 and often refered to a cartoon character named Magimp or something similar. Could have been Joe Magimp.

Follow Ups:


49

Posted by
Ian Clark on August 30, 2000 at 22:14:51:

What does the 49 mean in reference to SF ???

Follow Ups:


Re: 49

Posted by
John Martini on August 31, 2000 at 02:44:10:

In Reply to: 49 posted by Ian Clark on August 30, 2000 at 22:14:51:

It referes to 1849, the year the gold rush exploded. Although gold was actually discovered in January, 1848, it took a year for the rest of the world to jump into the fray. Miners generally referred to themselves as "49ers" for the year they arrived.

John

Follow Ups:


49ers football

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 31, 2000 at 03:21:53:

In Reply to: Re: 49 posted by John Martini on August 31, 2000 at 02:44:10:

The San Francisco 49ers are also the American football team that is located here.

-Ron

Follow Ups:


The Hyde Street Pier.

Posted by
John on August 31, 2000 at 03:39:12:

I am looking for information on the history
and development of the Hyde Street Pier.

Follow Ups:


Re: Cartoon Character

Posted by Grant73 on August 31, 2000 at 03:44:49:

In Reply to: Cartoon Character posted by tony prohaska on August 30, 2000 at 08:06:33:

"McGimp" is one of the words collected by one Peter Tamony, whose collection resides at the U of Missou. Tamony was a San Franciscan who died in 1985 and who collected information about early 20th Century S.F. A link to the description of his collection is below. The word is found under "M," however the definition or attribution is not on-line, though the site does welcome requests via a form on-site.

http://www.system.missouri.edu/whmc/invent/Tamony.htm (watch you don't miss the wrapped URL characters)

Follow Ups:


Re: CYC, ca 1877

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 31, 2000 at 09:07:25:

In Reply to: CYC, ca 1877 posted by Barbara Fussmann on August 29, 2000 at 22:08:26:

I found the following article which might give an explanation of the initials:

'A new Yacht Club was formed Thursday evening. It consists, at present, of twenty members, and will shortly be increased to forty. The name is "The Cambridge Yacht Club." Dr. Tucker's yach, "Minnie," will be engaged by them for the season. The Commercial Yacht Club will also engage her for alternate Sundays. She is a fine little vessel, and both Clubs consist of young gentlemen of good standing. We wish them well.'

Source: Daily Alta California, 30 March 1878, page 2.

Follow Ups:


Re: Oyster Saloons and Canneries

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 31, 2000 at 09:35:38:

In Reply to: Oyster Saloons and Canneries posted by Linda Okazaki on August 25, 2000 at 13:43:39:

Here is a short history of the oyster business:

Although different authorities differ as to the dates and people, the first attempts to bring oysters occurred between 1849 and 1850 (1). But, they were brought from Shoalwater Bay, Washington. According to one source, this bay supplied all the oysters to San Francisco for the next ten years. After that, oysters were also being brought from other waters in Washington and Oregon. In 1869, after the completion of the trans-continental railroad, oysters were being shipped fresh from the east, primarily New York, in refrigerated railroad cars. In 1880, the leading wholesalers in San Francisco were E. Terry & Co., Morgan & Co., Doane & Co., and Swanberg and West.

Transplating appeared to have started in the early 1870s. The muds of San Francisco Bay were found to be great for "fattening" the oysters, but would not allow them to spawn. It appears that oysters weren't canned in San Francisco by 1880. The canning industry was primarily for fruits and, occasionally, for salmon. But, by 1898, an article described oysters being shucked, washed, packed in boxes and sent daily to the city (San Francisco). There, in warehouses, they were "packed in square-cornered tin cans, thirty oysters to the can." The tins were then "packed closely in wooden boxes, which are lined with sawdust, a thin slab of ice being placed on top before the lid is nailed down." These cases could then be shipped long distances without further attention.

Surprisingly, there is only one oyster "saloon" listed today for San Francisco, the Swan Oyster Depot. Whenever I walk by it, it is always full, often with a line out on the sidewalk.

(1) Hittell said the first attempt was by Captain Feltstadt in 1850. The Chronicle article mentions J. S. Morgan in 1849 and another part (Robert Bruce, Mark Winant, and J. S. Morgan) in December 1851.The Bulletin article says it was Capt. Russell around 1850.

Sources:
Hittell, John S. The Commerce and Industries of the Pacific Coast of North America. 1882.
"Oystering in San Francisco Bay," San Francisco Chronicle, 6 February 1898, page 1.
San Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin, 9 February 1857, page 3.
Various articles on the Canning Industry, San Francisco Chronicle, 29 February 1928, 28 February 1930, and 3 March 1931.

Follow Ups:


The White House (Store)

Posted by
Janine Figueroa on August 31, 2000 at 09:42:26:

I am trying to find out some info that has to do with the old department store - The White House. Specifically, I am trying to find out information about a watercolor artist - "Kupur" - whose painting I have that was framed at the The White House. Having exhausted myself searching under the artists name for info about him/her, I thought I'd try searching another source. Go figure. Have any info I can go on?

Follow Ups:


Re: Local Building Research

Posted by
Kathleen Toland on August 31, 2000 at 11:23:47:

In Reply to: Re: Local Building Research posted by Judy De Bella on August 27, 2000 at 16:48:02:

I'm thinking of moving into the area. How do you like the neighborhood, people, etc.

Follow Ups:


Re: san quentin prison

Posted by
Beverly Stevens on August 31, 2000 at 16:01:33:

In Reply to: Re: san quentin prison posted by Ron Filion on June 13, 2000 at 09:43:55:

Ron,
you seem to quite knowledgable. I am doing my family genealogy, and I found out that I had a great uncle who did time back in the 1930s. The family is very tight-lipped about it, but I would like info. I know that he died some time ago. I wonder if you know -- would the prison archives have information? and would they release it? I would call the numbers you provided in your previous posts, but I don't live in the States.

thanks for any help

Follow Ups:


Re: san quentin prison

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 01, 2000 at 04:24:46:

In Reply to: Re: san quentin prison posted by Beverly Stevens on August 31, 2000 at 16:01:33:

I haven't dealt directly with this prison. But, I would think that you could write them for information. Their address is:

San Quentin State Prison
San Quentin, California 94964

They also have a web page at [http://www.cdc.state.ca.us/facility/instsq.htm].

Follow Ups:


burial location

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 01, 2000 at 04:55:15:

In Reply to: Doa Concepcion de Argello posted by Ron Filion on August 27, 2000 at 09:46:26:

She is buried at the St. Dominic's Cemetery in Benicia (corner of East Fifth street & Hillcrest Ave.). Her date of death was December 23, 1857. According to the Cemetery's office, there is a large monument for her, but they are unaware of any special occasion which would prompt the placing of flowers. The Dominican Convent has moved to San Rafael.

St. Dominic's Cemetery, Benicia, 707-751-0527
Dominican Convent, San Rafael, 415-453-8303

Follow Ups:


Re: The White House (Store)

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 03, 2000 at 09:51:57:

In Reply to: The White House (Store) posted by Janine Figueroa on August 31, 2000 at 09:42:26:

The White House began as "New and Fashionable Dry Goods Store." It was opened on June 19, 1854 at 141 Sacramento street by J. W. Davidson and Richard Lane. Raphael Weill, an 18-year old new arrival from France, was hired as an employee. In 1858, Lane left for the gold fields and Weill became a partner. By 1861, Raphael Weill had appeared to have bought out Davidson. In 1870 the store relocated to Kearny and Post streets, and the name of the store was changed to the White House after the famous Grande Maison de Blanche in Paris. The 1906 fire destroyed the building, but in three months, a temporary store was opened at Pine street and Van Ness Avenue. On March 13, 1909, a new store was opened on Sutter and Grant. Raphael Weill died in 1920. The store continued to operate until it closed its doors on January 30, 1965. The owners went bankrupt that same year.

Sources: San Francisco Chronicle, 3 January 1954 (4), 20 June 1954 (9), 2 April 1958 (4); San Francisco Chronicle Newspaper Index; and, California Information File, California State Library.

Follow Ups:


Re: The Hyde Street Pier

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 04, 2000 at 08:08:43:

In Reply to: The Hyde Street Pier. posted by John on August 31, 2000 at 03:39:12:

Hyde Street Pier was built in 1922 as an extension of Highway 101. Automobile ferries went from there to Sausalito and, eventually, also to Berkeley. The service lasted until about 1941, being made obsolete with the construction of the Golden Gate and Bay Bridges. On April 18, 1961, the State Divison of Beaches and Parks and the San Francisco Port Authority signed a lease under which the Hyde street pier would become a replica of an old-time wharf. The project was overseen by the San Francisco Maritime Museum association. The major ships (Balclutha, C.A. Thayer, Eureka, Wampama and Alma) arrived in October 1963. About 1978, the pier became part of the Golden Gate National Recreational Area (GGNRA), part of the National Park Service. About 1989, the pier became a separate national park.

Sources: National Park Ranger, Hyde Street Pier; San Francisco Chronicle, 19 April 1961, page 6.

Follow Ups:


Early San Francisco Methodist Churches

Posted by
Barbara Fussmann on September 07, 2000 at 17:14:44:

Hi Ron. Great-gr.grandfather John R. Sims was a
member of a Methodist Episcopal church in SF. He
arrived in San Francisco in 1850 and was still alive
in 1879, and I assume on into the 1880s - don't yet
know the year of his death. Where can I delve into
San Francisco Methodist archives? How many Methodist
churches were there in SF at that time?
Thank you for your attention.
Barbara Fussmann, Germany
bfussmann@t-online.de

Follow Ups:


City Directories

Posted by
Diane Diamond on September 08, 2000 at 04:10:59:

Where do you go to find city directories from the late 1800's or early 1900's?

Follow Ups:


Re: City Directories

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 08, 2000 at 04:21:10:

In Reply to: City Directories posted by Diane Diamond on September 08, 2000 at 04:10:59:

In addition to those online (see earlier posted question), one can find directories at the local libraries (such as the San Francisco Public Library) and historical societies (such as the California Historical Society). Also, local book stores sometimes sell individual directories (Argonaut Book Shop and Acorn Books).

Argonaut Book Shop: http://www.argonautbookshop.com
Acorn Books email: acornbks@netcom.com

Follow Ups:


Re: Early San Francisco Methodist Churches

Posted by
Diane Toomey on September 09, 2000 at 07:55:40:

In Reply to: Early San Francisco Methodist Churches posted by Barbara Fussmann on September 07, 2000 at 17:14:44:

There was at least one. My great grandmother's sister was married in 1890 in the Central Methodist Episcopal church by a Rev. Dr. Case. That's all I know. There is a Church with a similar name near the original location (Mission Street, I think).

Follow Ups:


Australian Link

Posted by
Becky Rayfield on September 10, 2000 at 08:46:58:

What is the link with Australia and the San Francisco area? We were pleasantly surprised to find place names such as Brisbane while on a visit. Thanks.

Follow Ups:


Re: Early San Francisco Methodist Churches

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 10, 2000 at 08:57:29:

In Reply to: Early San Francisco Methodist Churches posted by Barbara Fussmann on September 07, 2000 at 17:14:44:

This is a list of Methodist Episcopal churches in San Francisco in 1880:

First Methodist Episcopal Church, west side of Powell street, between Washington and Jackson.
Howard Street Methodist Episcopal Church, south side of Howard street, between Second and Third.
Central Methodist Episcopal Church, north side of Mission street, between Sixth and Seventh.
Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, east side of Mission street, between Eighteenth and Nineteenth.
Kentucky Street Methodist Episcopal Church, Tennessee street, south of Solano, Potrero.
St. Paul's German Methodist Episcopal Church, north side Broadway street, between Stockton and Powell.
German Methodist Episcopal Church, location Folsom street, between Fourth and Fifth.
St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church, South, west side of Russ street, between Howard and Folsom.
Bush Street Methodist Episcopal Church, Bush street, between Scott and Devisadero.
South San Francisco Methodist Episcopal Church, Fifteenth avenue, South San Francisco.
Scandinavian Methodist Episcopal Church, north side of Harrison street, between Fifth and Sixth.
African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, west side of Stockton street, between Clay and Sacramento.
African Methodist Episcopal Church, west side of Powell street, between Jackson and Pacific.
Chinese Mission House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, north side of Washington street, between Stockton and Powell.


I don't know of any central archives for this church. But, I did see a volume titled "Vital Statistics from Trinity Episcopal Church" that had a collection of baptisms, marriage and death records from 1849 to July 1906 (copy located at the San Francisco Public Library History room). This collection was compiled by the Daughters of the American Revolution. They have put together other similar types of compilations and may have done so for the churches listed above. Also, you might try contacting the Episcopal Diocese of California, 1055 Taylor, S.F. (415.673.5015).

Follow Ups:


Re: Australian Link

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 10, 2000 at 09:01:34:

In Reply to: Australian Link posted by Becky Rayfield on September 10, 2000 at 08:46:58:

Besides both being beautiful places and having beautiful people, Australians have been coming to this area since the 1849 Gold Rush. A number of individuals also left this area to go to Australia during a gold rush down there. With San Francisco's proximity to the Pacific ocean, it has been the major point for most cultures that line the Pacific Rims.

-Ron

Follow Ups:


Re: Looking for burial spot of Lucien M. Turner 1909

Posted by
Eric Ward on September 11, 2000 at 11:48:26:

In Reply to: Looking for burial spot of Lucien M. Turner 1909 posted by Lorrie Craven on July 14, 2000 at 15:22:16:

Sorry that I can't answer your question, but, if it is Lucien Turner from Mt. Carmel, Illinois, I have become familiar with him through my research into the life of the famed ornithologist Robert Ridgway. In fact, I have some copies of some letters LT wrote to RR during one of the former's trips to the North. Good luck with your search. I'll look through my stuff and see if I can find anything about his burial spot.
Best,
Eric

Follow Ups:


Re: Australian Link

Posted by
Joe Thompson on September 12, 2000 at 05:03:54:

In Reply to: Re: Australian Link posted by Ron Filion on September 10, 2000 at 09:01:34:

I grew up in the Richmond District of San
Francisco, the area by the ocean north of
Golden Gate Park. It was named by an
emigrant from Richmond, the suburb of
Melbourne, who built a structure called
Richmond House near the present intersection
of 12th Avenue and Clement. I can't remember
what year it was in the 19th century.


Follow Ups:


milo hoadley

Posted by
chris scott on September 12, 2000 at 09:22:16:

can someone please give me info on deputy surveyor hoadley and some of the historical homes some of these people may have lived in?

Follow Ups:


little hollywood

Posted by
rmorine on September 12, 2000 at 15:53:05:

i am looking for interesting historical fact, stories, legends about the little hollywood area. Can anyone help?

Follow Ups:


Ships under streets in S.F.?

Posted by
larry on September 13, 2000 at 02:25:18:

a buddy of mine mentioned that some hulls of ships were found under the streets... is that true?

I havent had time to investigate yet....

Follow Ups:


Re: Ships under streets in S.F.?

Posted by
delicia on September 13, 2000 at 04:59:30:

In Reply to: Ships under streets in S.F.? posted by larry on September 13, 2000 at 02:25:18:

what is that

Follow Ups:


Re: Ships under streets in S.F.?

Posted by larry on September 13, 2000 at 07:42:03:

In Reply to: Re: Ships under streets in S.F.? posted by delicia on September 13, 2000 at 04:59:30:

The hull of a ship is basically the wood frame
that held the ship together and kept the water out.
My buddy said that when some contractors were excavating an area to be built on, they uncovered some ships that were grounded an set on fire, but the hulls survived and then were built over.
Im interested in why they did it, when and all that stuff.

Follow Ups:


Re: Ships under streets in S.F.?

Posted by russel on September 13, 2000 at 14:46:56:

In Reply to: Ships under streets in S.F.? posted by larry on September 13, 2000 at 02:25:18:

yes, there are many ship buried under the streets of the downtown/waterfront area. During the gold rush, sailors would jump ship as as soon as they arrived in San Francisco to try and make their fortune. No was left to man these ships. Hundreds were abandoned. They were sank and used a landfill material.

Follow Ups:


Re: little hollywood

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 16, 2000 at 08:54:05:

In Reply to: little hollywood posted by rmorine on September 12, 2000 at 15:53:05:

Some of the tall tales include: Mae West, the actress, built and lived in a large home there during the 1939 International Exposition; that the developer of Hollywood moved north with his plans and duplicated them there; and, that it was once a secret enclave of movie stars.

According to a 1974 article by Harvey Hukari, "Before World War II, Little Hollywood was populated by doctors and dentists who planned to put the community on the map by building a yacht harbor in nearby Candlestick Cove. Ultimately the plans fell through and the doctors moved on and were replaced by a colony of Maltese who worked at nearby Schlage Lock. The Maltese later dispersed and upwardly mobile black and Filipino families moved into what remains a predominately white, yet comfortably integrated, area." One of the biggest problems for the neighboorhood appears to have been traffic and parking caused by crowds for the 49ers and Giants game.

Sources:
"Little Hollywood," San Francisco Independent, 7 August 1990, page 14A.
Hukari, Harvey Harlowe, "Little Hollywood & Other Hidden Neighborhoods", San Francisco [Magazine], September 1974, page 34.
San Francisco Progress West Bay, 16 December 1984, page 3.


Follow Ups:


Re: milo hoadley

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 16, 2000 at 09:04:19:

In Reply to: milo hoadley posted by chris scott on September 12, 2000 at 09:22:16:

I've posted a copy of an obituary for him at: [http://www.sf50.com/sf/hgoe13.htm]

According to the 1886 San Francisco City Directory, he was living at 2910 Bush street.


Follow Ups:


Re: Ships under streets in S.F.?

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 16, 2000 at 09:13:00:

In Reply to: Ships under streets in S.F.? posted by larry on September 13, 2000 at 02:25:18:

This is true, though how many is still unknown. The San Francisco Maritime Museum has identified at least 42 of them, but there are probably more. Most of these were storeships which just stayed in place as the early cove was eventually filled. Some of them also served as hotels or saloons. Probably the most recent famous one was the Niantic, which was discovered during an excavation in 1978. There were also ships that were sank on purpose to secure title to water lots.

For a great article, take a look at the one published in the San Francisco Chronicle on March 14, 1999. It also has a map of where they are.

Sources:
San Francisco Chronicle, 7 December 1980..
San Francisco Chronicle, 7 December 1994.
San Francisco Examiner, 16 December 1994.
San Francisco Chronicle, 14 March 1999.

Follow Ups:


Re: The Hyde Street Pier

Posted by
CaitlinBini on September 19, 2000 at 04:32:03:

In Reply to: Re: The Hyde Street Pier posted by Ron Filion on September 04, 2000 at 08:08:43:

Go to www.maritime.org. for more info. Also, the Maritime Museum at Fort Mason is an excellent source of archives, old photos, and memorabilia.

Follow Ups:


Fires in SF

Posted by
Caitlin Bini on September 19, 2000 at 04:37:24:

Hey Ron. Do you remember which fire station Lily Coit was so enamored with? I heard she even embroidered her undergarments with the firehouse number. Also, I heard SF burned down a number of times (6?) before the 1906 earthquake. Where can I find this info. Lastly, it was required by law that all residents kept filled water buckets in their homes. What year was this (I know it was before the earthquake) and where can I get a photo or picture of a bucket--they were special round-bottomed buckets to prevent dairy farmers from stealing them! See ya.

Follow Ups:


Re: Fires in SF

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 19, 2000 at 05:08:44:

In Reply to: Fires in SF posted by Caitlin Bini on September 19, 2000 at 04:37:24:

Lillie Hitchcock-Coit was made an honorary member of the Knickerbocker Engine Company, No. 5.

The great fires you heard about are the ones from 1849-51. The dates were 24 December 1849, 4 May 1850, 14 June 1850, 17 September 1850, 4 May 1851, and 22 June 1851. The City Museum has a couple of interesting items on the web:
May 1851 fire map: [http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist5/5-51fire.html]
Eyewitness to the Sixth Fire: [http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist10/6thfire.html]

The Fire Department Museum, on Presidio Avenue between Bush and Pine, may have information on the buckets.

Follow Ups:


Alamo School History

Posted by
bonny krucik on September 19, 2000 at 06:47:03:

I hope you will be pleased to know that I provided a link to your site from the Alamo School History page I did in honor of the public school's 75th anniversary.

Alamo School is a K-5 public school in San Francisco and I maintain the website as a volunteer. You can see the school's history and link to your page at www.alamoschoolfoundation.org/history/history.htm
The website is designed primarily for students and their parents.

Thanks for your interesting site.

Follow Ups:


Re: Fires in SF

Posted by
John Martini on September 19, 2000 at 12:37:11:

In Reply to: Fires in SF posted by Caitlin Bini on September 19, 2000 at 04:37:24:

Also check for those buckets at the Maritime Museum. The same type of round-bottom buckets were used on ships where they were stored in special racks.

John


Follow Ups:


Societies of San Francisco

Posted by
Barbara on September 20, 2000 at 11:57:39:

Do you have any information regarding the Irish American Benevolent Society organized in San Francisco in May 1860?

Follow Ups:


Re: Horseracing 1907 San Francisco

Posted by sf cabdriver on September 20, 2000 at 18:21:28:

In Reply to: Horseracing 1907 San Francisco posted by Nancy Copeland on August 13, 2000 at 11:55:51:

you may want to try and check up on URBANO drive
it was a race track around the time of your family members death http://www.sfmuseum.org/1906.2/lang.html

Follow Ups:


Golden Gate Bridge

Posted by
Daniel on September 20, 2000 at 23:58:38:

I'm doing a paper on how the GGB had an effect on San Francisco (and the surrounding areas). What I really need to know is what the city was like (in terms of traffic, economy, travel time between the city & the north, etc.) before the GGB was built & after it was built. Anything would help. Thanks.

Follow Ups:


History of Bernal Hill

Posted by
Catherine Rauschuber on September 21, 2000 at 07:58:06:

I am doing some research on the land use history Bernal Hill. Does anyone know of any great sources to consult? Thanks!

Follow Ups:


Burnett and Slatterly Photographers

Posted by
Randy Church on September 21, 2000 at 17:07:54:

I'm looking for info about the photographers, Burnett and Slatterly. Their business was located on the N.W. Corner of Valencia and 16th Sts. S.F.

Thanks

Follow Ups:


Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 24, 2000 at 07:44:37:

In Reply to: History of Bernal Hill posted by Catherine Rauschuber on September 21, 2000 at 07:58:06:

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps are probably one of the best resources for land-use history. Also, U.S. Topographical maps are good. If you are looking for more current info, check with the city's Planning Department.

Follow Ups:


Re: Burnett and Slatterly Photographers

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 24, 2000 at 07:54:48:

In Reply to: Burnett and Slatterly Photographers posted by Randy Church on September 21, 2000 at 17:07:54:

I found the following information in the San Francisco city directories.

"Burnett and Slattery" seems to have been a partnership formed by Frank W. Burnett and Thomas F. Slattery in 1885. They were located at 448 1/2 Valencia. Before that, Frank W. Burnett was listed as a photographer working for I. W. Taber since 1881. Slattery wasn't listed until 1885. The partnership seems to have lasted until 1896. Burnett was still listed as a photographer after that, but Slattery appears to have become a policeman.

-rf

Follow Ups:


Re: Golden Gate Bridge

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 24, 2000 at 08:04:36:

In Reply to: Golden Gate Bridge posted by Daniel on September 20, 2000 at 23:58:38:

In terms of traffic, the number of automobiles were swamping the auto ferries that were running from Hyde Street and Market Street Piers. In fact, the completion of the bridges (Golden Gate and Bay) almost put the ferry lines out of business.

Besides newspaper articles and other books on the Golden Gate Bridge, I would recommend reading "The Golden Gate Bridge, Report of the Chief Engineer to the Board of Directors of the Golden Gate Bridge and Highway District," September 1937.

-rf


Follow Ups:


The Barkentine "Joseph L.Eviston"

Posted by
Walter Eviston on September 25, 2000 at 03:29:36:

I am looking for information on Joseph L.Eviston who had a
lumber ship built for himself in Oregon in 1900. The ship's home port
was SF and Mr.Eviston married a Lizzie Duffield in 1882.
Ideally I would like info about his lumber business and the cemetary
where he is buried.

Follow Ups:


San Francisco History

Posted by
Toni Barowski Y Ramirez de Arellano on September 25, 2000 at 07:46:53:

CONGRATULATIONS ON FANTASTIC WORK, WHAT A GREAT JOB.
The accuracy and authenticity of your San Francisco History Pages is nothing less than SENSATIONAL.

This is one of the few times we have been able to read accomplishments made by our family (Ramirez de Arellano) that reflect the true character of this proud and noble family whose presence in America spans 508 years. AS well as being one of the founding families of San Francisco, the city of San Antonio, Texas (1659) was created with the Alamo built by the Order of the Marque de Valero(Gov General of Nueva Espana) Baltasar de Zuniga Y Ramirez de Arellano, the church at Mission San Jose (Texas) was built by Friar Pedro Ramirez de Arellano circa 1730 not to mention a little place called Mejico City built by Hernan Cortes (Marquee the Valley of Oaxaca) married to Juana de Zuniga Y Ramirez de Arellano grandaughter of the Duke de Bejar. Crew lists of the Nina-Pinta-Santa Maria list the names of the ancestor/relatives of some of your first families of San Francisco and it is safe to say that many are members of the first families of America.The Sanches-Garcias Pachecos-Perlatas-Ramirez de Arellanos have been related to each other long before thay arrived in the new world they indeed are member of the most elite families whos Grandfathers founded Espana.

Follow Ups:


Photography

Posted by
Caitlin Bini on September 26, 2000 at 09:30:12:

What is the difference between a dagguerotype and a tin-type? Also, when were photographs first tinted? Thank you!

Follow Ups:


Re: Photography

Posted by
Julia Christy on September 26, 2000 at 13:18:53:

In Reply to: Photography posted by Caitlin Bini on September 26, 2000 at 09:30:12:

Here is a photo history website you may find helpful:
http://genealogy.org/~ajmorris/photo/photo.htm


Follow Ups:


Clubs or gangs?

Posted by
Dale Flores on September 26, 2000 at 15:56:09:

I'm looking for information about a "club" in San Francisco in the 1930's 40's called the "pepperones"? I most likly have the spelling wrong, but I believe it had female members, and from the sounds of it was more a gang then a club? My mother-in-law mentioned it, in connection to her sisters, but she is loosing her memory, and so this is all I have. Can anyone help me?

Follow Ups:


Crocker-Bayshore Tract

Posted by
Russel on September 27, 2000 at 04:02:50:

Does anyone know the history of the Crocker-Bayshore Tract?

Follow Ups:


Early San Francisco Postmasters

Posted by
Jane Scollay on September 27, 2000 at 04:29:23:

Can you tell me the names of the earliest postmasters and the years they were in office?

Follow Ups:


Can anyone identify this?

Posted by
Robert E. Holmes on September 27, 2000 at 12:42:34:

I have an old pin about 3 inches long in the shape of a bear walking on all fours and his teeth are showing. The pin has raised printing on it which reads "SAN FRANCISCO 1904". The pin is gold on color. At the bottom of two of the feet are two small rings which appear to have had something hanging from them at some time. I came to the historical site about San Francisco in the hopes I could find something to help me identify this pin. Does anyone know what it is commemorating? Thanks. Bob

Follow Ups:


Re: Early San Francisco Postmasters

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 28, 2000 at 01:47:06:

In Reply to: Early San Francisco Postmasters posted by Jane Scollay on September 27, 2000 at 04:29:23:

San Francisco Postmasters 1849-1980

1849 C. L. Ross (temporary)
1849 John W. Geary
1850 W. P. Bryan (temporary)
1852 Jacob B. Moore
1854 Thomas J. Henley
1856 Charles L. Weller
1860 Samuel H. Parker
1864 Richard F. Perkins
1868 Holland Smith
1870 N. B. Stone
1874 James Coey
1882 Samuel W. Backus
1886 William J. Bryan
1890 Samuel W. Backus
1894 Frank McCoppin
1898 W. W. Montague
1904 Arthur G. Fisk
1914 Charles W. Fay
1922 James E. Power
1928 Harry L. Todd
1934 William H. McCarthy
1946 John F. Fixa
1966 Lim P. Lee
1980 Jefferson Wilson

Source: San Francisco City Directories. 1850-1980. Note: Some starting dates may not be exact.

Follow Ups:


Re: Societies of San Francisco

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 28, 2000 at 01:51:50:

In Reply to: Societies of San Francisco posted by Barbara on September 20, 2000 at 11:57:39:

According to an article in 1889, the Irish-American Society decided to dissolve due to aging membership. They decided to sell their hall at 818 Howard street, worth about $32,000, and after paying a debt of $1500, split the proceeds between the remaining 115 members. The society's roll had numbered 600 at one time.

Source: San Francisco Morning Call. 4 June 1889. 7.

Follow Ups:


Five Mile House

Posted by
Stephen Kent Ehat on September 28, 2000 at 05:21:08:

I am interested in knowing the exact location of the "Five Mile House" in San Francisco, where my great grandfather is said to have lived in the 1880s until perhaps about 1893 (when he died). A number of sources on the internet seem to give me some leads but I am not sure what conclusions to come to.

For example, the following posting at http://www.sfo.com/~timandpamwolf/sfranq_k.htm am mentions the "Five Mile House" and reads in relevant part as follows: "They [the Kellys] owned boarding houses and saloons in San Francisco from 1860-1900. They were first established on Jessie Street in the 1860's the moved to Mission Road about 1890. The Mission Road saloon was known as the "Six Mile House". * * * * Mary and Frederick owned the Five Mile House on Mission Road . . . ."

I note from http://home.earthlink.net/~visvalley/history.htm (Visitacion Valley Grapevine-Valley History) that the "Five Mile House" referred to there apparently was located "at San Bruno and Wilde avenues" and this seems to be confirmed by what is said at http://www.sf50.com/sf/hd910j.htm (1910 Street Guide) which states that the nearby Mill Street (only about seven short blocks away from San Bruno and Wilde avenues) was, in 1910, said to be located "off San Bruno Av nr 5 Mile House." That would indicate to me that Five Mile House was in Visitacion Valley on San Bruno Avenue at a point five miles south of City Hall (which was located at third and Market, as far as I understand).

However, if one looks for references not to the "Five Mile House," but rather to the "Four Mile House" or the "Six Mile House," one finds information that needs explnation. For example, according to an obituary found at http://www.sfo.com/~timandpamwolf/sfobica.htm, the "Four Mile House" was located at "Mission street, near Thirty-first. . . ." That obituary reads as follows:

"CASTLES--In this city, July 9, Patrick CASTLES, a native of Tullaughmore, King's Ireland, aged 89 years. [New York and Dublin papers please copy.] Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend the funeral today (Wednesay), at 1 o'clock p.m., from the residence of his son, James CASTLES, Mission street, near Thirty-first, above the Four-Mile House. Interment Mount Calvary Cemetery." (Source: San Francisco Call, 11 July 1883 page Y.)

Then again, the "Six Mile House" was apparently located along the San Bruno Road, according to the following obituary:

"WITTEN--In this city, December 2, Thomas WITTEN, a native of England, aged 57 years. Funeral to-day, at 1 p.m., from his late residence, opposite Six-mile House, San Bruno road." (Source: Daily Alta California, 4 Dec 1885.) [See also http://www.sf50.com/sf/he863.htm (San Francisco History, Events of 1863) where it is stated that on "May 3 [1863]. An Italian named Pietro Arcardi or Lercari was shot dead near the Six Mile House on the San Bruno Road."]

All in all, then, I am not sure exactly where the Five Mile House was located (and I am not sure there was not more than one Five Mile House). Does anyone have any information?

The mention of Five Mile House is significant to me because my great grandfather, Giusepppi Ferrea, is said to have lived there as early as August of 1882 and as late as October of 1890. (See 1882 Great Register of Voters, San Francisco, stating his age to be 34 years as of the 23 August 1882 date of his voter registration and stating that he was then living at "5-mile House," that his occupation was "grocer," and that his nativity was "Italian"; see also 1890 Great Register of Voters, San Francisco, stating his age then to be 43 years as of the 15 Oct 1890 date of his voter registration and that he was then still living at "Five-Mile House" and that his occupation was "storekeeper").

If anyone has any further information concerning the "Five Mile House" (especially any photographs of the place or documents referring to the "Five Mile House"), I would be most interested in hearing from you. I have thought for years that it was located on or near San Jose Avenue or Mission Street. But perhaps I have been mistaken.

Thanks.

Steve Ehat

Follow Ups:


Re: burial location - Benicia

Posted by Grant73 on September 29, 2000 at 06:27:11:

In Reply to: burial location posted by Ron Filion on September 01, 2000 at 04:55:15:

Thanks, Ron. Was I wrong that she was ever domiciled at the S. Raf. convent in addition to St. C's?

Follow Ups:


Re: Five Mile House

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 29, 2000 at 08:39:10:

In Reply to: Five Mile House posted by Stephen Kent Ehat on September 28, 2000 at 05:21:08:

The miles were calculated from the City Hall when it was located on Kearny between Clay and Washington (and across from Portsmouth Square). According to city directories back to 1867, the Four Mile House was located on the NW corner of Mission & 31st (1867); Five Mile House on San Bruno Road, five miles from City Hall (1879); and, Six Mile House on San Bruno Road, near County Line (1868).

Follow Ups:


J. Porter Shaw Library, S.F. Maritime National Historical Park

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 29, 2000 at 08:42:57:

In Reply to: The Barkentine posted by Walter Eviston on September 25, 2000 at 03:29:36:

The J. Porter Shaw library will take maritime questions directly. Their website is at:
[http://www.nps.gov/safr/local/lib/libtop.html].

Follow Ups:


1904 St. Louis World's Fair?

Posted by
Ron Filion on September 29, 2000 at 08:54:18:

In Reply to: Can anyone identify this? posted by Robert E. Holmes on September 27, 2000 at 12:42:34:

This a long shot, but it might be connected to the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. There is a nice site for this at: [http://www.inlink.com/~terryl/].

Follow Ups:


1915 SF Exposition

Posted by Caitlin Bini on September 30, 2000 at 05:17:01:

I have a pamphlet from the 1915 San Francisco Exposition that is titled Old Settlers and Pioneers Day It includs speeches made by some of the original settlers that day, their photos, and a really great two-foot long, pull-out photograph of all the old pioneers. Hundreds of Victorian elderly people are grouped together with elaborate architecture in the background. One building looks like the Palace of Fine Arts, but Im not sure.
Can you tell me anything about this Old Settlers Day and my photograph?
I also have a tour guide and map of the 1939 Exposition...



Follow Ups:


Turk

Posted by
Stephen King on October 01, 2000 at 05:15:36:

I have purchased an 1896 carriage house on Turk. It must at some time been assocaited with a main home. ANy thoughts on what and where this home may have been. Address would have been around 2000 Turk

Follow Ups:


Will & Finck

Posted by
Bob Veal on October 01, 2000 at 10:20:16:

Looking for information on dry goods(Kitchen Eqpt. Oil Lanterns,Etc)
Dealer, WILL & FINCK 821 Kearney St. SF. Years unknown.

Follow Ups:


water tower?

Posted by
Joy Richardson on October 01, 2000 at 12:02:43:

I am curious about a structure located in the Portola District of SF. I was told that it is a water tower that was used for the orchard that once existed here. Where can I get more information??

Follow Ups:


Relief home for the Aged and Infirm

Posted by
Louise on October 02, 2000 at 02:01:44:

The 1910 census lists a Relief Home for the Aged and Infirm, and the residents there are listed as inmates.
The 1913 San Francisco city directory on page 501, under County Hospital, says see Relief Home for Aged and Infirm.
Does anyone know what happened to this home, and where the records of the residents would now be found. Also would the information
be available? Thanks

Follow Ups:


Re: 1915 SF Exposition

Posted by
Julia Christy on October 02, 2000 at 09:45:54:

In Reply to: 1915 SF Exposition posted by Caitlin Bini on September 30, 2000 at 05:17:01:

Built in order to commemorate the opening of the Panama Canal, the Palace of Fine Arts IS a remnant of the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition. It was open from 20 Feb to 4 Dec 1915.

Follow Ups:


S. F. Mission district

Posted by
Neeshah Azam on October 04, 2000 at 05:36:00:

I'm a student at skyline college and I'm doing a research paper on the history of s.f.'s mission district. I'm specificly looking for history about the mission with i'ts Irish and Latino (root) influences.

Follow Ups:


Re: Will & Finck

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 04, 2000 at 10:00:02:

In Reply to: Will & Finck posted by Bob Veal on October 01, 2000 at 10:20:16:

According to city directories, Frederick A. Will was listed as a cutler by 1861, even though he may have been here sooner. Julius Finck appears in 1863 as a partner of Browning (Augustus) & Finck, locksmiths and bellhangers, at 834 Kearny. Will had expanded his services to manufacturing cutlery and surgical instruments. In 1864, the partnership of Will & Finck is listed as "cutlers, surgical instrument makers, locksmiths and bell hangers," at 605 Jackson. In 1874, they were located at 821 Kearny and 140 Montgomery. In 1884, Julius Finck and Samuel W. Levy appeared to own Will & Finck which was then located at 769 Market. By 1895, Will & Finck appeared to been incorporated and Julius Finck was the president. At that time, it was located at 818-820 Market and was doing business as "manufacturing cutlers and electrical contractors." By 1900, they had expanded the business to include importing, toys, etc. In 1907, Will & Finck appears to be owned by W. F. Will and Julius Finck. They were located at 1686 Market, where they stayed for the next 21 years, and had were doing business for "cutlery, barber's supplies and sporting goods." In 1928 to 1933, a factory was listed at 65 McCoppin. In 1930, Will & Finck was listed as owned by only W. F. Will and was located at 34 Page doing "barber's supplies." The last listing appears in 1933.

Follow Ups:


Re: Turk

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 04, 2000 at 10:02:11:

In Reply to: Turk posted by Stephen King on October 01, 2000 at 05:15:36:

That address would have been located at the southeast end of the Calvary Cemetery.

Follow Ups:


Re: Relief home for the Aged and Infirm

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 04, 2000 at 10:08:56:

In Reply to: Relief home for the Aged and Infirm posted by Louise on October 02, 2000 at 02:01:44:

There was an interesting article about the dedication of eight new buildings for the Laguna Home in 1926. It was located at the corner of Seventh Avenue and Dewey boulevard and covered two blocks. According to the article, "the home was erected by the city to replace the old Relief Home built by the Red Cross twenty years ago." It appears that this may be the same one. If it is, it was also called the Laguna Honda Home, which was addressed in another place on the board.

Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 23 December 1926, page 13.

Follow Ups:


Re: S. F. Mission district

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 04, 2000 at 10:14:11:

In Reply to: S. F. Mission district posted by Neeshah Azam on October 04, 2000 at 05:36:00:

The Mission District has been around since 1776, so there is quite a bit of history. A good start would be KQED's TV show and information on their website. Their website is at:
[http://www.kqed.org/tv/productions/hood/mission/]


Follow Ups:


Golden Gate Bridge

Posted by
Kristin Watson on October 04, 2000 at 23:04:06:

I am doing a report for school and I need to know the length of the Golden Gate Bridge in kilometers

Follow Ups:


seeking information

Posted by
Fr Vijay Kiran on October 05, 2000 at 03:17:19:

I am a catholic priest Fr Vijay Kiran doing Ph.D on catholic church archives. I need information on mangagement of archives and a list of computer software to catalogue the archival materials. If you have any information, kindly mail it to me. I will be very grateful to you. God bless you
fr vijay kiran

Follow Ups:


Re: Herman Darms

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 05, 2000 at 05:29:25:

In Reply to: Herman Darms posted by Gail Darms Baker on July 11, 2000 at 06:10:12:

"Herman A. Darms...died Napa on September 11, 1946, age 75. He was not a veteran; he was single. He was born in Wisconsin on June 22, 1871 and his "usual" occupation was given as a "coal miner". An obit in the NAPA WEEKLY JOURNAL, however, noted "The venerable Napa man was a pioneer photographer in California....two brothers, also of Napa, survived him. For details of his photo career, see Ken L. Elder and John H. Grainger, PHOTO POSTCARDS--ALASKA/KLONDIKE: ALASKS/ YUKON PHOTOGRAPHERS....Ketchikan: Tongass Publishing Co., c.1989: page 17. This entry contains a significant amount of information. Darms was also a photo-engraver."

Follow Ups:


Re: Golden Gate Bridge

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 05, 2000 at 06:12:58:

In Reply to: Golden Gate Bridge posted by Kristin Watson on October 04, 2000 at 23:04:06:

Total length of Bridge including approaches: 8,981 ft or approximately 2,737 m

There are more facts and figures at the following websites:
[http://www.thoma.com/thoma/ggbfacts.html]
[http://www.mcn.org/Goldengate/08-History/Page3.html#GGBridgeFacts]

Follow Ups:


Catholic Church Archives

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 05, 2000 at 06:15:32:

In Reply to: seeking information posted by Fr Vijay Kiran on October 05, 2000 at 03:17:19:

Here is the contact information for our local archives:

Roman Catholic Church Archives
320 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, CA 94063
(650) 328-6502
Hours: Mon through Fri 10-3:30

Follow Ups:


Occidental Club

Posted by
Diane Diamond on October 06, 2000 at 01:33:12:

Does anyone know what the Occidental Club in 1895 was? And what would your job have consisted of if you were a steward there? Do you know where it was located?

Thanks.

Diane

Follow Ups:


Trains/or travel to SF

Posted by
Diane Diamond on October 06, 2000 at 01:35:52:

If someone traveled from Kansas to SF around 1895, how would they have traveled? If anyone has the names of specific companies (train or other) that traveled this route it would be much appreciated. Are their passenger lists for any of these?

Thanks

Diane

Follow Ups:


SF Examiner 1887-1888

Posted by
Diane Diamond on October 06, 2000 at 01:38:33:

What would an engraver have done for the SF Examiner in 1887-1888? Would he have been a photographer? Were photographers given credit when their work appeared in the newspaper, or was there a list published of people who contributed to that paper?

Thanks

Diane

Follow Ups:


jesse street

Posted by
linda grabbert on October 08, 2000 at 12:23:31:

was it working class, slum or what before the earthquake?

Follow Ups:


History of Japantown Area

Posted by
Jocelyn Lowe on October 09, 2000 at 07:58:35:

I've had several, and many others have experienced super-natural encounters on the premises of a house on Pine Street, between Laguna and Webster. Were there any cemeteries, fires or tragedies that had occurred in this area in the history of San Frnacisco?

Follow Ups:


Sunset Cemetery

Posted by
Margaret Posehn on October 10, 2000 at 03:27:35:

I'm searching for information on Sunset Cemetery -
the death certificate I have shows this man was buried
there in 1909. Any ideas as to where his remains
might now be?

Follow Ups:


Re: jesse street

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 10, 2000 at 03:57:34:

In Reply to: jesse street posted by linda grabbert on October 08, 2000 at 12:23:31:

I presume you meant the 1906 earthquake. South of Market was primarily working-class Irish. The closer you got to the waterfront, you would have encountered those involved in the shipping industry.

Follow Ups:


Re: Sunset Cemetery

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 10, 2000 at 04:36:24:

In Reply to: Sunset Cemetery posted by Margaret Posehn on October 10, 2000 at 03:27:35:

You may be referring to the Sunset View Cemetery in Colma. It was closed in 1951 and the records are kept at Olivet Memorial Park.

Source: [http://www.notfrisco.com/colmatales/sfgen.html]

Follow Ups:


St. Francis Wood

Posted by
John O'Connor on October 10, 2000 at 14:47:51:

Am looking for any documentation (written, photographic, other) for the history of St. Francis Wood. Thanks.

Follow Ups:


St. Francis Wood map

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 11, 2000 at 02:28:47:

In Reply to: St. Francis Wood posted by John O'Connor on October 10, 2000 at 14:47:51:

The Library of Congress' American Memory website has a great map (year?) in thier digital photo collection. The site address is:

[http://rs6.loc.gov/ammem/ammemhome.html]

Follow Ups:


Re: Location of grave of Dona Concepcion de Arguello?

Posted by
Fr. LaSalle Hallissey, O.P. on October 11, 2000 at 02:46:15:

In Reply to: Location of grave of Dona Concepcion de Arguello? posted by Steve Knipp on August 27, 2000 at 00:15:29:

Hi! On Oct. 11, 2000, at 11:00 AM, there will be a short liturgy at Concepcion Arguello's grave in Saint Dominic's Cemetery in Benicia. A rose will be left at her grave from Count Rezanov's family and soul from her grave will be taken to his grave in Russia and then soil from his grave will later be placed on her grave. See the story in today's Contra Costa Times at http://www.contracostatimes.com Of course, the public is invited!

Follow Ups:


Fresh water sources

Posted by
Caitlin on October 11, 2000 at 04:39:24:

What did Native Americans and early settlers do for fresh drinking water?
Were there natural springs or rivers?
I believe Folsom street used to be a river; did it simply dry up? What was its source?
Thank You!

Follow Ups:


Children's Playground in GG Park

Posted by
Caitlin Bini on October 11, 2000 at 07:27:20:

Hi Ron. I'm trying to find any historical info on Children's Playground in Golden Gate Park. When was it founded? Why? What play equipment did it have? Did it have barnyard animals for petting? for rides? Where can I see photos? (The library only has one photo prior to 1906.)
Thank you for your help!

Follow Ups:


Re: SF Examiner 1887-1888

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 11, 2000 at 09:46:58:

In Reply to: SF Examiner 1887-1888 posted by Diane Diamond on October 06, 2000 at 01:38:33:

Photographs weren't being used yet. The newspaper used engravings, which were sometimes signed.

As for a list of who worked for the paper, you might want to contact them directly as they (Examiner) are still in existence. Their website is at [http://www.sfgate.com/examiner/].

Follow Ups:


Re: Trains/or travel to SF

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 11, 2000 at 09:51:47:

In Reply to: Trains/or travel to SF posted by Diane Diamond on October 06, 2000 at 01:35:52:

I noticed an ad in the Examiner (1 Sep 1895, page 27) for the "Atlantic and Pacific Railroad." It went from SFO to LAX, than to Chicago via Kansas City. I would presume it had a similar route coming back.

Follow Ups:


Re: 1915 SF Exposition

Posted by
Ron Filion on October 11, 2000 at 09:54:54:

In Reply to: 1915 SF Exposition posted by Caitlin Bini on September 30, 2000 at 05:17:01:

Pioneer and Old Settler's Day was celebrated at the Exposition on Saturday, October 16, 1915. Ceremonies were held in the ballroom of the California state building.

Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 17 October 1915, page 33.

Follow Ups:


RETURN TO INDEX
Return to San Francisco Genealogy
Public Commons License