Got Questions? Archive


1945 history

Posted by
H Cauchy on July 14, 2000 at 07:21:50:

I'm looking for a few good details having to due with the Navy presence in San Francisco, summer, 1945, for an upcoming book.

Stuff like movie theater names; features showing; # of bars; approx. # of military men; any names at all of where they hung out; weather that summer... Anything at all. We're having a terrible time finding anything without referencing fiction (we live in Michigan).

Would also be very interested in recollections from the same period of Mare Island and Vallejo.

Thank you so much,

Heather Cauchy

Follow Ups:


Looking for burial spot of Lucien M. Turner 1909

Posted by
Lorrie Craven on July 14, 2000 at 15:22:16:

We were told that my great grandfather Lucien M. Turner was buried at the Presidio in 1909 but when a family memeber went to find his grave they said he was not there. Just looking for helps. Cravenlo@digisys.net

Follow Ups:


Robert C. Dore

Posted by
Ian Patton on July 15, 2000 at 00:56:11:

I work at a museum in British Columbia, Canada. I am doing research for a project on the Wild Horse Gold Rush of 1864-65. Wild Horse Creek is approximately 10 miles NE of Cranbrook, BC, Canada. One of the first men on Wild Horse Creek was Robert C. Dore. Like many of the prospectors, he had first come to the west during the California gold craze. He did quite well and apparently had a mansion on Nob Hill. He was involved in SF Municipal politics as the Superintendent of the House of Correction and as a Street Superintendent and Deputy Sherrif. He returned to Wild Horse Creek to find the mother lode that had never been uncovered and died here in 1907.

I do not know if he is related to Benjamin Dore or Maurice Dore, two other names I have come across in my research.

If anyone has any information on Robert C. Dore or useful sources I may consult, I would be very interested in hearing from you.

Thanks

Ian Patton
Display Coordinator
Fort Steele Heritage Town
www.fortsteele.bc.ca

Follow Ups:


Obituaries/Genealogy Lookups

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 15, 2000 at 03:29:24:

In Reply to: Looking for burial spot of Lucien M. Turner 1909 posted by Lorrie Craven on July 14, 2000 at 15:22:16:

I would recommend finding his obituary. A majority of the time, they list the cemetery where the deceased was buried. If you don't know the exact date, it is possible to find it in the California Death Index. There are volunteers that do lookups for that Index and the local newspapers. If he was in the military, and his isn't at the Presidio, he might be at the Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, just south of San Francisco.

Here are websites you will want to look at:

Current Cemetery Listing: [http://www.sfo.com/~timandpamwolf/sfrancem.htm]
Lookup Help: [http://www.sfo.com/~timandpamwolf/sfranlok.htm] and
[http://helplist.org/usa/ca.shtml]

-Ron

Follow Ups:


Re: city directories for 1901 and 1915

Posted by Shelbee on July 15, 2000 at 07:49:32:

In Reply to: city directories posted by Debbie on July 12, 2000 at 03:09:29:

Try this:

http://amaty.simplenet.com/gen/ca/sfo/sfoco_.htm

It contains city directories for 1901 and 1915, plus the SF phone book for 1933.

Follow Ups:


"Grizzly Bear" Magazine

Posted by
Ann Darrow on July 17, 2000 at 08:38:57:

Does anyone know if there was a magazine called the Grizzly Bear edited by the Sons and Daughters of California? Found a series of articles in a local newspaper "The Antioch News" from Antioch, IL that published a reminiscence of Mary Story Howard and of her families trip by wagon to Sutter Creek, CA from Antioch, IL. The family of 7 left IL in 1852 and returned in 1859. Very interesting story, with detail of life in Amador City and Sutter Creek. Would like to know is this magazine existed. Thanks. Ann Darrow

Follow Ups:


Laguna honda home

Posted by
ame reynolds on July 18, 2000 at 02:15:27:

Ron,
My greatgrandfather died in 1939 in Laguna Honda Home. Can you give me any information on this place in 1939? We have found mention of Laguna Honda Hospital, but I'm not sure if it is the same place. Can you give me any information on this place?
Thanks

Follow Ups:


Re: "Grizzly Bear" Magazine

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 19, 2000 at 09:43:42:

In Reply to: "Grizzly Bear" Magazine posted by Ann Darrow on July 17, 2000 at 08:38:57:

Yes, the magazine does exist. The San Francisco Main Library's History Room has copies of issues from 1908 to 1954.

-Ron

Follow Ups:


Re: Laguna honda home

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 19, 2000 at 09:50:06:

In Reply to: Laguna honda home posted by ame reynolds on July 18, 2000 at 02:15:27:

I believe the Home became the Hospital. The 1939 City Directory lists the Home at 7th & Dewey, same as the Hospital. An article in 1938 discusses the breaking of ground for a "...new building [which] will house 400 patients and will serve as the hospital of the home for treatment of patients with chronic ills." The article also mentioned that "In 1906...it was a $400,000 shack built by the San Francisco Relief Corporation as a Red Cross home for treatment of aged victims of the fire and earthquake."

Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 10 December 1938, page 9.

Follow Ups:


Re: 1945 history

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 19, 2000 at 10:19:11:

In Reply to: 1946 history posted by H Cauchy on July 14, 2000 at 07:21:50:

Here is a sampling of information from the newspapers of July, 1945:

The weather was typical for the summer : fog rolling in at night as the sun sets and slowly burning off in the morning with clear skies in the afternoon. Temperatures range from low 50s at night to mid 60s in the day, and sometimes rising to around 70.

Some of the movies showing that month were:

"The Great John L.", at the Orpheum, with Greg McClure, Linda Darnell, and Barbara Britton.
"The Valley of Decision", at the Warfield, with Greer Garson and Gregory Peck.
"Conflict", at the State, with Humphrey Bogart.
"Blood on the Sun", at United Artists, with James Cagney and Sylvia Sidney.
"We're Not Dressy", at the New Mission, with Bing Crosby.
"Give Me A Sailor", at the New Fillmore, with Bob Hope.
"A Bell For Adano", at the Fox, with Gene Tierney, John Hodiak, and William Bendix.
"National Velvet", at the El Presidio, with Mickey Rooney and Elizabeth Taylor.
"Nob Hill," at the St. Francis, with Vivian Blaine.
"Thrill of Romance", at the Fox, with Van Johnson and Esther Williams.
"Those Enduring Young Charms", at RKO Golden Gate, with Robert Young and Laraine Day.
"The Fighting Guardsmen", at the Esquire, with Willard Parker and Anita Louise.
"The Naughty Nineties", at the Orpheum, with Abbot & Costello.
"Call of the Wild", at the Paramount, with Clark Gable.
"The Corn is Green", at the Warfield, with Bette Davis.

Some of the live acts included the "King Cole Trio--Undisputed Swing Champions of 1945", "Al Donahue and His Orchestra", "Tony Pastor and His Orchestra", all playing at RKO Golden Gate. The "Ice Follies" were at the Winterland.

-Ron

Follow Ups:


?? Beachmoun Drive, S.F.

Posted by
Gretchen Harris on July 20, 2000 at 04:49:00:

Can you direct me to a map site that would show location of Beachmount (or Beachmont?) Drive in San Francisco around 1944 - does it still exist - curious in Ontario Canada

Follow Ups:


San Francisco's Almshouse(poor house)

Posted by
Dayna on July 20, 2000 at 11:28:14:

I recently located a death notice for a g-g-g-grandmother's twin brother He died in 1889 and was listed in the San Francisco Call under "City and County Almshouse". The potter's field is gone and I will contact Olivet Memorial Park where the records are to see what else I can find. But I cannot find any other references to the Almshouse or Poor house. Was this a county operation or would this fall under state auspices and only located in SF?
Has anyone else come across this?
Suggestions are greatly appreciated!

Follow Ups:


Beachmont Drive, S.F.

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 20, 2000 at 15:05:25:

In Reply to: ?? Beachmoun Drive, S.F. posted by Gretchen Harris on July 20, 2000 at 04:49:00:

Yahoo! Maps shows the correct place for it. "Beachmont" is the correct spelling.

-Ron

Follow Ups:


ice

Posted by
Chef Clyde Serda on July 21, 2000 at 01:13:20:

I am writing a article on the history of ice, which i talk about ice houses, ice delivery men, ice boxex the first home freezers. do you have anyinformation on local ice, most of my information come from the east coast but leaves out California....Thank you

Follow Ups:


Schultz Family, Shipping

Posted by
Judy Thomas on July 22, 2000 at 02:18:07:

Where do I go in order to find information on the Schultz family? This family owned docks in what is not South San Francisco. From an article that I found not long ago about one of the family members being shot and killed by a dog catcher ( early 1900's ), the paper said the Schultz family was prominent in San Francisco.

-- Judy

Follow Ups:


Local Historical Resources

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 22, 2000 at 05:27:41:

In Reply to: Schultz Family, Shipping posted by Judy Thomas on July 22, 2000 at 02:18:07:

The San Francisco Main Library would be my first stop. They have two excellent centers: the History Center and the Newspaper Center. The History Center has everything including books, maps, photographs, vertical files, biographical indexes, etc. The Newspaper Center, along with many early newspapers and magazines on microfilm, has the California Information File, an index created in the California Library in Sacramento, and other newspaper indexes. Both have excellent librarians willing to help you in your search. Some other local resources include the J. Porter Library, a major maritime historical resource, and the California Historical Society. The Bancroft Library, in Berkeley, is also an excellent resource with many original records. For addresses and telephone numbers, consult my Links page.

-Ron

Follow Ups:


Re: San Francisco's Almshouse(poor house)

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 23, 2000 at 09:19:31:

In Reply to: San Francisco's Almshouse(poor house) posted by Dayna on July 20, 2000 at 11:28:14:

I believe the Almshouse was operated by the City of San Francisco, although the State of California did partially fund it at one time. I found an interesting article from 1892 which described the Almshouse:

"On the western slope of the hills that are south of Golden Gate park, and in a direct line about four and a half miles from the new City Hall, are two large and one small building which are officially designated as the Almshouse. One of these is four-story structure which overlooks the reservoir of the Spring Valley Water Company, known as Lake Honda. The other is located a hundred yards north. The third is a small building situated still further north, and at one time, in the very long ago, used as a hospital for patients suffering from smallpox and other contagious diseases. These are located on 80 acres of ground owned by the city. The four-story structure, in which are located the quarters of the superintendent and other officers, has accommodations for 500 inmates, and was opened when but three stories had been finished on the 12th of September, 1867, under the superintendence of George F. Harris. . . .The three-story structure [hospital building] was erected in 1886 and it is calculated to furnish room for 350 paupers, making in all room for 910 without crowding, and the number there are the present time is about 780, 160 being women. . . ."

Source: San Francisco Morning Call, 25 April 1892, page 3.

Follow Ups:


Re: ice

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 23, 2000 at 09:20:17:

In Reply to: ice posted by Chef Clyde Serda on July 21, 2000 at 01:13:20:

Here is a short history of ice production in California:

By August 1850, shortly after the Gold Rush of 1849, ice was being imported from Boston to San Francisco. One early pioneer wrote about seeing an ice cart with the sign, "Boston Lake Ice," with ice being sold about 30 cents per pound. In 1851, large quantities were being imported by Ferdinand Vassault and others with the cost of ice around 12 1/2 cents per pound. In 1854, the Russian-American Commercial Company brought the first cargo of ice from Sitka, Alaska, and the price dropped down to 5 cents per pound. In 1857, Wells Fargo & Co. delivered the first commercial ice to Los Angeles. The Russian-American Commercial Company became the major supplier of ice until the late 1860s, when the Central Pacific was built across the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Several small companies took advantage of the situation, and ice was then primarily brought from the high Sierra waters. By 1881, the west coast was consuming 50,000 tons of ice, 30,000 in California, and 10,000 in San Francisco. One-sixth of that amount was artificial production. In 1890, the consumption was up to 60,000 tons annually. Over 90 percent of that amount was supplied by the Union Ice Company of San Francisco (in 1892, they had 135 agencies along the Pacific Coast). From 1890 to 1895, there was a price war waging between the top three manufacturers, Union, National, and Consumers' Ice Companies, forcing the price down to half a cent per pound. In 1916, the "Big Three" were being challenged by new independents, People's, Arctic, and Mutual companies.

In 1979, only one ice company was left in San Francisco, San Francisco Ice Company. One of its customers was "a single Pacific Heights woman in her 90s who is apparently the only San Franciscan who still uses an old fashioned ice box."


Sources:
Bancroft, H. H., History of California, volume 7, page 86: 1890.
Hittel, T. H., History of California, volume 3, pages 432-433:1897.
Hittel, J. S., Commerce and Industries of the Pacific Coast, page 567: 1882.
California Historical Quarterly, vol. 12., page 98: March 1933.
California Historical Quarterly, vol. 13., pages 339-340: December 1934.
San Francisco Chronicle, 12 September 1979.
San Francisco Examiner, 16 May 1916, page 9.
San Francisco Morning Call, 3 August 1890, page 8; 15 December 1892, page 3; 2 April 1895, page 12.

Follow Ups:


history of the building of the Bayveiw/ Hunter's Point of S.F.

Posted by
Melinda Ross on July 23, 2000 at 16:59:59:

I want to find out the history of my neighborhood, the Bayview/Hunters' point District. I would also like to get information on the building of my home which I know was built in 1909. I want to find out who the contractor was. There may be some truth that the contractor was a female and if so in 1909, she had to be one of the very few if not the 1st in S.F.

Follow Ups:


Local Building Research

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 24, 2000 at 03:11:22:

In Reply to: history of the building of the Bayveiw/ Hunter's Point of S.F. posted by Melinda Ross on July 23, 2000 at 16:59:59:

There is a great page outlining how to do building research in S.F.: [http://206.14.7.53/GENCOLL/building.htm]

As for the histories of the Bayview/Hunter's Point neighborhoods, they are long and interesting. I wouldn't be able to justice to them here. But, I would recommend visiting the San Francisco Main Library's History Room. To get an idea of what books, etc. they have the subject, do a search of their catalog at: [http://206.14.7.1/]

-Ron


Follow Ups:


Re: Question

Posted by
rachelle Walker on July 26, 2000 at 07:55:33:

In Reply to: Question posted by chad herman on May 23, 2000 at 11:45:41:

could i find out any info on pollution problems

and a description of the site and situation of san francicisco and the advantages of these

thanking you
rachelle

Follow Ups:


Re: San Fran Bay

Posted by
Maricel on July 26, 2000 at 22:24:35:

In Reply to: Re: San Fran Bay posted by Ron Filion on July 05, 2000 at 16:30:16:

Dear Mam/ sir,
I woluld like to know if San francisco bridge and the Golden gate are one? and please give me some important places inside California? thank you

Follow Ups:


Stadium Name

Posted by
Tom on July 27, 2000 at 04:16:06:

What was the name of the stadium in downtowm San Francisco, prior to the construction of Candlestick Park?

I know Seals Stadium is where minor league baseball was played, as well as the early major league games of the Giants.

Was that where football was played?

Follow Ups:


Kezar Stadium

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 28, 2000 at 04:29:56:

In Reply to: Stadium Name posted by Tom on July 27, 2000 at 04:16:06:

Kezar Stadium is over in Golden Gate Park. According to the website below, the 49ers were there from 1946 to 1970, and the Raiders in 1960.

[http://www.mediacity.com/~csuppes/NFL/misc/index.htm?../SanFrancisco49ers/oldindex.htm]

Follow Ups:


Re: San Fran Bay

Posted by
Ron Filion on July 28, 2000 at 12:15:27:

In Reply to: Re: San Fran Bay posted by Maricel on July 26, 2000 at 22:24:35:

There isn't a "San Francisco Bridge." Though, tourists might call the "Golden Gate Bridge" that. The other big bridge extending from San Francisco is the "Bay Bridge."

-Ron

Follow Ups:


Kate Kennedy

Posted by
David Giesen on July 29, 2000 at 06:57:36:

Though I have extensively employed Miriam deFord's They Were San Franciscans, Tierra Redondo, and Dr.Paley's Foolish Pigeons, I feel there must be more material about Kate Kennedy. deFord asserts Kennedy's 1872 (or 4) case set the legal precedent for equal pay for women worldwide, but I can't pluck hide nor hair of independent verification of that fact. Did all the legal briefs burn up in '06?

What is certain is Kennedy is a sadly underestimated figure in women's and human rights histories (where she appears at best as a footnote). She was, deFord asserts, a member of the Knights of Labor and knocked down the political spoils system here in California. Why isn't she on the horizon, much less the foreground, of SF histories? Does her association with Henry George (even more egregiously obscured than Kennedy) have something to do with it? Doesn't sound likely (too conspiracy-seeming), but hey, academic Economics has ignored George and his distinction twixt human-made stuff and land. But back to Kate. . .any research resource ideas?

David

Follow Ups:


Re: Kezar Stadium

Posted by
Paul G. Overend on August 01, 2000 at 21:06:09:

In Reply to: Kezar Stadium posted by Ron Filion on July 28, 2000 at 04:29:56:

Kezar Stadium was also used by the students of Lowell High School, at least for a time. My late father was a student at the latter during the war and mentioned practising at the stadium.

Follow Ups:


Re: Ship Arrivals & Departures

Posted by
Paul G. Overend on August 01, 2000 at 21:46:37:

In Reply to: Ship Arrivals & Departures posted by Ron Filion on May 28, 2000 at 06:42:47:

Is anyone who owns the volumes by Rasmussen mentioned above, willing to do a lookup for me? I am interested in an ancestor who arrived in San Francisco by the Panama route in 1852 but am unable to access these volumes in my local library as they don't hold it (currently living in England, not much call for books on Californian history I guess). Many thanks,

Paul

Follow Ups:


What was Satanella's?

Posted by
Paul G. Overend on August 01, 2000 at 22:00:23:

I have a copy of a letter from my g-g-grandfather to his son written in 1881, in which he mentions going to the city from Mare Island for about 8 days during which he was to visit Golden Gate Park, Mechanics Faire, Satanella and Woodwards.

Golden Gate Park I know (obviously), Woodward's was a park. I assume Mechanics Faire was an exhibition of technology but I've no idea about Satanella.

Follow Ups:


Need Poster

Posted by
Jerry Beck on August 01, 2000 at 23:49:15:

I would like to purchase a poster of the city of Saucilito. Let me know where I might order one. I need this info ASAP for an August birthday.

Thanks,
Jerry

Follow Ups:


Re: Kate Kennedy

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 02, 2000 at 06:32:39:

In Reply to: Kate Kennedy posted by David Giesen on July 29, 2000 at 06:57:36:

Miriam deFord's chapter, in her book "They Were San Franciscans," on Kate Kennedy seems to be complete. She mentions articles by Kennedy of her travels to Europe were published in the San Francisco Bulletin in 1878. That newspaper is available on microfilm. She also mentions Kennedy's articles, "Short Sermons to Workingmen," in the San Francisco Star. This paper might be available at the State Library in Sacramento.

I checked other newspaper references and found her obituaries and a blurb about her court case. I've put these online at [http://www.sf50.com/sf/hgoe11.htm]. Miriam deFord also had written a short letter to a local newspaper about Kate Kennedy and her role as a pioneer in women's rights (San Francisco Chronicle. 27 May 1942. 12]. I found her quote that Miss Kennedy as "the first woman anywhere in the world to receive, as a salaried employee, equal pay with men for equal work..." enlightening. I also saw a mention of her nomination, which she won, for Superintendent of Public Instruction for the United Labor Party (San Francisco Chronicle. 28 September 1886. 5.) I did find a magazine article, "Kate Kennedy," by Harry K. Wolff, President, San Francisco Civil Service Commission (South of Market Journal. September 1934. 5.)

Miss Kennedy's legal case was started in the Superior Court, and those records were probably destroyed in the 1906 disaster. But, luckily, the case went to the State Supreme Court. Those records would be available from the California State Archives [http://www.ss.ca.gov/archives/archives_e.htm]. As for other sources, deFord did mention in her newspaper letter that (in 1942), Kennedy had "Two prominent attorneys and a well-known physician of [San Francisco who were] her nephews." I would also check the California Historical Society and Bancroft Library. If she was known on a national level, she might have appeared in other newspapers, such as the New York Times.

-Ron.

Follow Ups:


Re: Need Poster

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 02, 2000 at 06:38:58:

In Reply to: Need Poster posted by Jerry Beck on August 01, 2000 at 23:49:15:

Check out [http://www.sausalitoartfest.org/store/]

Follow Ups:


Re: What was Satanella's?

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 03, 2000 at 09:41:50:

In Reply to: What was Satanella's? posted by Paul G. Overend on August 01, 2000 at 22:00:23:

Here is an advertisement from 1881:

"TIVOLI GARDEN.

Eddy street, between Market and Mason.

KRELING BROS......................Proprietors

INSTANTANEOUS SUCCESS

BALFE'S GRAND SPECTACULAR OPERA.

SATANELLA! SATANELLA!
SATANELLA! SATANELLA!
SATANELLA! SATANELLA!
SATANELLA! SATANELLA!

EVERY EVENING TILL FURTHER NOTICE.

Audiences Held in Amazement

.......WITH THE........

MOST WONDERFUL
MECHANICAL EFFECTS
OF THE DAY.

Most Comfort and Best Entertain-
ment Offered in This City."

Source: San Francisco Chronicle. 22 July 1881.

Follow Ups:


Need Information For Project...

Posted by
Chris Stewart on August 03, 2000 at 10:07:47:

Hi, My name is Chiris Stewart and Im a yr 9 student from Bombala in Australia. I need any Information on San Francisco. I need just normal information on the city. No history or nothing. Thanx.

Chris (/\/\/\/\)

Follow Ups:


General Information

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 03, 2000 at 15:08:48:

In Reply to: Need Information For Project... posted by Chris Stewart on August 03, 2000 at 10:07:47:

The City of San Francisco has, as part of their site, a general information area: [http://www.ci.sf.ca.us/infogen.htm]

If you need to know something that isn't available there, don't hestitate to ask.

-Ron

Follow Ups:


Need info how find someone who was alive during S.F. fire

Posted by
Jan Mc Cullah on August 04, 2000 at 17:43:57:

My grandfather's sister use to live out there during depression and she said something about a fire. I found out infromation about a fire in San Francisico. How do you find about someone living during that time.
Jan Mc Cullah

Follow Ups:


Re: Need info how find someone who was alive during S.F. fire

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 05, 2000 at 03:57:47:

In Reply to: Need infro how find someone who was alive during S.F. fire posted by Jan Mc Cullah on August 04, 2000 at 17:43:57:

Well, the first and easiest step would be to check the City Directories. Besides info on where they lived, occupation and place of employment is sometimes listed. Men were the ones primarily listed. But depending on the year, married women would be listed as spouses if they didn't work. Also, widows (with the name of their deceased husbands) and single, working women were also listed. Articles about the fire, if it was major, might be available in the local newspapers.

-Ron.


Follow Ups:


Re: Mission theater

Posted by
Christopher VerPlanck on August 05, 2000 at 07:26:41:

In Reply to: Mission theater posted by Brian Labrie on May 21, 2000 at 08:29:56:

I researched the New Mission Theater several years ago and wrote a history of it. I also have historic photos.

--Chris

Follow Ups:


Fenian Chronicle/ Irish Newspaper

Posted by
Jay Shuttleworth on August 05, 2000 at 07:35:38:

I am trying to locate holdings of a fenian newspaper (Irish political newspaper) likely printed in San Francisco in mid- to late- 1860s. Correspondents from other newspapers referred to it as the "Fenian Chronicle." It had a printing office in Colfax in Spring of 1867. John Sutton was the editor/ printing chief in the Colfax office.

Regards,
Jay Shuttleworth jmshuttleworth@ucdavis.edu

Follow Ups:


"Golden Bridge" ?

Posted by
george on August 07, 2000 at 02:41:07:

Does anyone know of a company that possibly existed in the bay area called "Golden Bridge"? Possilby a soft drink company or beer brewery?

Thank you

Follow Ups:


Dr. Washington Dodge

Posted by
Joe Shomi on August 07, 2000 at 04:54:23:

I have two questions: (1) is the 1912 residence of Dr. Washington Dodge, the former city tax assessor and survivor of the Titanic disaster, still standing? The phone book lists the address at 2129 Laguna, which is no longer there. However, an article in the Examiner says Dodge lives "alongside Washington Street." The only residence at the intersection of Washington and Laguna is 2297 Laguna. Did the street numbers change? (2) Next, is "Dodge Place," which intersects with Turk street near the U.S. Courthouse and Federal Building, named after Washington Dodge?

Follow Ups:


Titanic's White Star Line office

Posted by
Joe Shomi on August 08, 2000 at 03:28:05:

Elkan Gunst Building

Does anyone know where the Titanic's White Star Line office was located in the Elkan Gunst building (at 323 Geary Street) in
1912? What was the suite or floor number?

International Mercantile Marine at "319" Geary

The 1915 city directory lists the J.P. Morgan company, and holding company for White Star Line, and other shipping lines, as
located at 319 Geary. Since the Gunst Building is 323 Geary, and is on the corner - - what building is being referred to?

Follow Ups:


history of gays in the Castro

Posted by
Susanne on August 08, 2000 at 09:13:11:

I was curious as to why the gay community decided on the Castro
/Noe Valley district as a place to build their community.
I heard something about the renovation of the Victorians,
but there has to be more to it...........Thank you

Follow Ups:


Triangle of Defense San Francisco Bay

Posted by
David on August 08, 2000 at 15:33:22:

I just visited the Golden Gate. We stumbled upon Battery Spencer. I was a History major with a concentration on miitary history, but I had no idea that such a defensive network ever existed. Where can I find references for the "Triangle of Defense?" With all the defensive stations and Alcatraz it seems that one ought to be able to locate something. Unfortunately I've had no luck. Any suggestions?

Follow Ups:


Re: Titanic's White Star Line office

Posted by
David on August 08, 2000 at 15:38:21:

In Reply to: Titanic's White Star Line office posted by Joe Shomi on August 08, 2000 at 03:28:05:

The building that used to house the White Star Line Office is now "The Eagle Cafe" on Bay 39, San Francisco. There are all kinds of historical pictures related to the White Star Line and information decorating their walls. And it's good food for the buck too!

Follow Ups:


Re: Dr. Washington Dodge

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 09, 2000 at 09:26:38:

In Reply to: Dr. Washington Dodge posted by Joe Shomi on August 07, 2000 at 04:54:23:

(1) 2129 Laguna: according to the 1912 directory, this would have been located between Sacramento and Clay, facing the park; and, the address is what was listed for him.

(2) Dodge Place: probably not named for him. It was already in place by, at least, 1875.


Follow Ups:


Re: history of gays in the Castro

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 09, 2000 at 09:27:29:

In Reply to: history of gays in the Castro posted by Susanne on August 08, 2000 at 09:13:11:

Here's a quote from one source I found:

"Eureka Valley [Castro District] seemed to change overnight into a gay ghetto, but this evolution was probably a development over time as homes in the neighborhood became vacant through the deaths of their residents and these resident's married children were already well established in town on the Peninsula or in the East Bay. . . .The establisment of the Pendalum [Bar] in or about 1969 was really the ceremonial baptism of Eureka Valley as both a developing gay residential area and a locality whose gay bars attracted gay men from neighborhoods through San Francisco and the rest of the San Francisco Bay Area. . . ." - James F. Gibbons

Source: Bay Area Reporter. 22 June 1989. 42.

Follow Ups:


Re: Fenian Chronicle/ Irish Newspaper

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 09, 2000 at 09:34:51:

In Reply to: Fenian Chronicle/ Irish Newspaper posted by Jay Shuttleworth on August 05, 2000 at 07:35:38:

I cannot find a reference to a newspaper of that specific name in San Francisco. The three Irish papers I am aware of are:

1863... ? ... Irish Nationalist
1860... 1876... Irish News
1866... 1866... Irish People

In "The San Francisco Irish 1848-1880," by R. A. Burchell, the author references the "Irish Times" when he is commenting about the local Fenian circles. In "Irish Californians," by Patrick Dowling, the author talks about a local Fenian leader by the name of Michael Wrin who shut down his newspaper in 1872. Unfortunately, the name of the paper wasn't mentioned.

Copies of the "Irish News" is availabe at the California State Library. Their online catalog is at [http://www.lib.state.ca.us/].

Hope any or all of this helps.

Follow Ups:


Re: Titanic's White Star Line office

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 09, 2000 at 09:48:35:

In Reply to: Titanic's White Star Line office posted by Joe Shomi on August 08, 2000 at 03:28:05:

319 Geary was in the Elkan Gunst Building (which still exists). It was probably on the ground floor. An article in one of the local newspapers describes a scene at their offices shortly after the disaster"

"....The office of the White Star line in San Francisco was dark and deserted last night, although many persons went there in the hope of learning something about the fate of relatives or friends on the Titanic.

"These callers and those who happened to walk by the offices, which are in the Gunst building in Geary street, near Powell, saw a weird sightweird in the light of what had happened or was happening in the Atlantic.

"In one of the windows of the offices was a large picture of the giant steamship of which everyone in the company was so proud. It showed the ship plunging through the waves in all the glory of mans highest achievement over water. It looked like a living monster...."

Source: San Francisco Examiner. 16 April 1913. 16.

Full article online at the Museum of City of San Francisco webite: [http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist5/titanic1.html]

Follow Ups:


Re: Titanic's White Star Line office

Posted by
Joe Shomi on August 09, 2000 at 11:01:01:

In Reply to: Re: Titanic's White Star Line office posted by Ron Filion on August 09, 2000 at 09:48:35:

Ron, David:

Thanks for your feedback.

Follow Ups:


Re: Dr. Washington Dodge

Posted by
Joe Shomi on August 09, 2000 at 11:02:29:

In Reply to: Re: Dr. Washington Dodge posted by Ron Filion on August 09, 2000 at 09:26:38:

Thanks for the feedback, Ron.

Follow Ups:


Re: Triangle of Defense San Francisco Bay

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 10, 2000 at 10:57:42:

In Reply to: Triangle of Defense San Francisco Bay posted by David on August 08, 2000 at 15:33:22:

Here is a great list of resources:

"Seacoast Fortifications of San Francisco Harbor" by Erwin Thompson. National Park Service: Denver (1979).

"A History of Forts Baker, Barry, and Cronkhite" by Erwin Thompson. National Park Service: Denver (1979).

"Fortress Alcatraz" by John Martini. Pacific Monographs: Kailua, HI (1991).

"Fort Point: Sentry at the Golden Gate" by John Martini. Golden Gate National Parks Association: San Francisco. (1991)

"Official Map & Guide to the Harbor Defenses of San Francisco." Golden Gate National Parks Association: San Francisco. (1993?)

"Artillery At the Golden Gate" by Brian Burr Chin. Pictorial Histories: Missoula, Montana. (1994?).

Thanks to John Martini for putting this together!

Follow Ups:


Horseracing 1907 San Francisco

Posted by
Nancy Copeland on August 13, 2000 at 11:55:51:

Hi. I have been trying to find a site(s) regarding Horse Races ca 1907 in San Francisco. Family history states my gggrandfather, Charles P. Copeland was a jockey and died in a fall from a horse in 1907. Could you direct me toa site that contains information re: this subject. Thank you for all your efforts, have a great day.

Follow Ups:


Jesse St circa 1886 to 1895

Posted by
linda grabbert on August 15, 2000 at 07:54:56:

I'm tracking a "lost g-grandmother" circa 1893. Am interested in what 445 Jesse St was like then. A recent visit showed it to be a run down area. Was it residential, poor or working class or run down then? Thanks Linda

Follow Ups:


Standard Specialty Co.

Posted by
Maureen Plotke on August 15, 2000 at 09:20:14:

I am trying to find out information about an old
wooden box I purchased at an estate sale. There are
two labels on it - Each say "Standard Specialty Co.,
San Francisco - Products of the California Redwood
Forests" On the bottom of the box it is a large label
(3x5) with a picture of trees and the same name, etc.

I am curious if this company is still in
business and, if not when they were in business.

Any help is appreciated.

Maureen

Follow Ups:


James Leary Flood

Posted by
Pat Valentino on August 15, 2000 at 09:46:01:

Recently I was at a wedding in San Franciisco at The James Leary Flood Mansion. I was iterested in this man and how he made his money and his home and when it was built and any thing you could tell me about it...the only thing I could find out was that when the gold mines filled with water he was responsible for getting the water out. Thank you

Follow Ups:


French Admiral Cloue

Posted by
John Martini on August 16, 2000 at 01:15:22:

Seeking information on French Admiral Cloue who appears in photos taken on Alcatraz during summer 1869. I can't find any references to Cloue or his visits in newspapers of the time, though. Anyone have ideas on where to look? I can't imagine he visited the City without any media coverage.

Thanks.

Follow Ups:


Folklore about Lombard Street?

Posted by
Cathy Grubman on August 16, 2000 at 06:19:44:

I was recently in San Francisco and took a bus tour of the city. We visited Lombard Street, and the tour guide said "Once a bus tried to drive down it and got stuck... it had to be airlifted out!" Does anybody remember this? Is this just urban myth? Also, I'm trying to get a detailed history of the street and am only finding bits and pieces. Does anybody know who I could contact to find out more? I'd love to talk to somebody who lives on Lombard! I mean, how does one get furniture delivered? Thanks much!

Follow Ups:


Vollmer House / August Vollmer

Posted by
Brendan Holly on August 19, 2000 at 01:26:33:

Is there any connection between the Eastlake row house at 1735 Webster, usually called "Vollmer House", and police chief and educator August Vollmer?
Thanks

Follow Ups:


Finding an old mortuary

Posted by
Rich Harvey on August 19, 2000 at 06:21:56:

I have learned thru doing my family roots, I had a great great uncle that was a mortician with his own family business. The name of the business was J.C. O'Conner Mortuary in San Francisco. This would have been late 1800's to early 1900's. Was there such a business in S.F.? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Follow Ups:


Re: Jesse St circa 1886 to 1895

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 19, 2000 at 11:36:43:

In Reply to: Jesse St circa 1886 to 1895 posted by linda grabbert on August 15, 2000 at 07:54:56:

It was a working-class neighborhood, primarily Irish.

Sanborn Fire Insurance maps also give an indication of what types of businesses and dwellings were in the area. For your address, it was about half a block west of the U.S. Mint. In 1887, the area appeared to be primarily dwellings on Jessie street. There was a Chinese Laundry a few doors to the west (459), next to a Carriage Factory (461) which extended to Mission street. On Mission street, behind 441 Jessie, was a "Coffins etc." At the end of the block, near the Mint, was a veterinarian and an undertaker.

-Ron.

Follow Ups:


Re: Standard Specialty Co.

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 19, 2000 at 11:40:45:

In Reply to: Standard Specialty Co. posted by Maureen Plotke on August 15, 2000 at 09:20:14:

According to the San Francisco City Directories, this company first appears in 1942. The listing was as follows:

Standard Speciality Co., Nut Salad and Fruit Bowls, Cookie and Candy Boxes, Poker chip racks and trays, 2199 Folsom.

It was in the last directory I checked, one from 1975, at the same address. I don't see the company listed in the current phone book though.

-Ron.

Follow Ups:


Golden Brand?

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 19, 2000 at 11:46:34:

In Reply to: "Golden Bridge" ? posted by george on August 07, 2000 at 02:41:07:

While searching through the San Francisco City Directories, I couldn't find a "Golden Bridge," but I did find references to a "Golden Brand." The first listing appeared in 1944 and seemed to disappear in 1966. It seems they were brewers to begin with and were probably distributors later. Below is the listing from 1944. They were listed at 275 Barneveld Ave. soon after.

Golden Brand Bottling Co., brewers, agts 1450 15th.


Follow Ups:


Re: Folklore about Lombard Street?

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 19, 2000 at 11:52:31:

In Reply to: Folklore about Lombard Street? posted by Cathy Grubman on August 16, 2000 at 06:19:44:

The San Francisco Main Library History Room has many copies of newsarticles regarding the street. One of the better ones covering the history of the street was "The Straight Scoop on Lombard Street" in the San Francisco Chronicle, 15 April 1984.

I tried to find any references to a "stuck bus," but only came across a "stuck truck." A 25-foot long flatbed truck, loaded with chain-link fencing, tried to do the curves in February 1989. It got stuck on the third one. They had to unload the truck and it was eventually hauled by tow trucks back up to Hyde Street. (Source: San Francisco Examiner, 22 February 1989, page A-11.)


Follow Ups:


Re: Finding an old mortuary

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 19, 2000 at 11:56:23:

In Reply to: Finding an old mortuary posted by Rich Harvey on August 19, 2000 at 06:21:56:

Yes, the mortuary did exist. The San Francisco Main Library History Room has copies of "Undertaker's Records" from there.

Follow Ups:


Re: James Leary Flood

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 22, 2000 at 07:53:00:

In Reply to: James Leary Flood posted by Pat Valentino on August 15, 2000 at 09:46:01:

The property for the mansion was bought in early 1911 at an estimated $150,000. The mansion was probably built soon after. The architects were Bliss & Flaville. It was donated in 1939 by a deed of gift from Mrs. James Flood, widow at the time, to Religious of the Sacred Heart to become the Academy of the Sacred Heart. The mansion and school still exists to-day.

I found a short, interesting article discussing how both father and son made their fortunes. It is posted at: [http://www.sf50.com/sf/hgoe12.htm]

Sources:
San Francisco Chronicle, 18 May 1911, page 9.
San Francisco Examiner, 7 November 1915.
San Francisco Chronicle, 25 June 1939, page 8S.

Follow Ups:


Falcon Avenue (now Market St)

Posted by
Rich Swenson on August 22, 2000 at 08:15:17:

I'm trying to verify when my house was built. The previous owner (now deceased) claimed that the house was built around 1888; I'm guessing that this date has been passed down verbally from owner to owner since its construction. Prior to the Market Street extension project (somewhere around 1920, I think), the street was called Falcon Avenue (within San Miguel Rancho). The previous owner of the house claimed that the address was 264 Falcon Avenue. However, the Sanborn Fire Insurance Street Maps from 1899-1900 clearly show the address as 258 Falcon. The earlier Sanborn maps don't cover the area. The water tap records show that water wasn't connected until 1912. The water tap records and the 1907 Block Book both show the name "H.A. Boysen".

I tried to find Boysen in the City Directories (so I could work backwards to see if I could verify a date earlier than 1899-1900.) However, after looking in (almost) every directory from 1899 to 1920, I couldn't find a Boysen on Falcon Ave.

My next step is to look at the newspaper microfilm archives in the real estate section, starting with 1888 and moving forward.

Any other suggestions? Also, is there a place that would hold the house's "official" street address change from Falcon to Market (in order to further verify it's former address as 258)?

Follow Ups:


Re: Falcon Avenue (now Market St)

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 22, 2000 at 08:36:21:

In Reply to: Falcon Avenue (now Market St) posted by Rich Swenson on August 22, 2000 at 08:15:17:

There is a great page outlining how to do building research in S.F.: [http://206.14.7.53/GENCOLL/building.htm].

As for the street name change, I would contact the San Francisco Planning Department first. Their web page is at: [http://www.ci.sf.ca.us/planning/index.htm].



Follow Ups:


Youth's Directory (Father Crowley's)

Posted by
Diane Toomey on August 24, 2000 at 05:32:28:

Both my grandfathers went to what they called "Father Crowley's" school, probably around 1890-1905. Other than the one article I found via the SF genweb page I have not been able to get any information on this institution. Do you know where I might look for greater data?

Follow Ups:


Re: Falcon Avenue (now Market St)

Posted by
Julia Christy on August 24, 2000 at 11:36:44:

In Reply to: Falcon Avenue (now Market St) posted by Rich Swenson on August 22, 2000 at 08:15:17:

My experience with house numbers seems to indicate that some streets had their houses renumbered 1880 - 1910: Such as #206 becoming #214 Dolores. Could you use census films to determine what the house "number" was, perhaps using Boysen surname or one of the other neighbors listed in the block book? OR using a neighbor from the block book, track THAT house number back in time, in city directories, to determine a renumbering?

Follow Ups:


515 market st

Posted by
Diane Wilson on August 24, 2000 at 12:42:17:

I'm trying to find information on a business by the name of Potter Fixture Company. I have an antique mirror I'm trying to date and the only clue is a metal plate with the business name and an address of 515 Market St.. in San Francisco. The mirror is full length and very old. It had three sides to it so it may have been in a store dressing room.
Any information would be greatly appreciated
Thank You
Diane Wilson

Follow Ups:


Re: Horseracing 1907 San Francisco

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 25, 2000 at 03:38:48:

In Reply to: Horseracing 1907 San Francisco posted by Nancy Copeland on August 13, 2000 at 11:55:51:

The sports pages of the times were covering races at the Oakland, Emeryville and Santa Anita tracks. There were also races at the Golden Gate and Ingleside tracks in San Francisco. Tanforan, in San Bruno, was another major horsetrack in the SF area.

-Ron.

Follow Ups:


largest/biggest "party" or "celebration" in SF history

Posted by
David Asari on August 25, 2000 at 04:18:36:

what might be considered the largest/biggest "parties" in San Francisco history? Could be private or public. What might the estimated attendance have been? Thanks!

Follow Ups:


Re: Youth's Directory (Father Crowley's)

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 25, 2000 at 09:33:19:

In Reply to: Youth's Directory (Father Crowley's) posted by Diane Toomey on August 24, 2000 at 05:32:28:

In 1887, Archbishop Riordan directed Reverend Father D. O. Crowley to establish a Youth's Directory. There are articles available in the newspapers (especially the San Francisco Call) about the Father and the Directory. There are also some articles in periodicals and a short biography in the book, "San Francisco Municipal Blue Book" of 1915. This information would be available at the San Francisco Main Library (see 1890s Call Index and History Room) and the California State Library in Sacramento. As this was under the auspice of the Catholic Church, you might possibly get some detailed information from the Catholic Archives:

Roman Catholic Church Archives
320 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, CA 94063
(650) 328-6502
Hours: Mon through Fri 10-3:30


Follow Ups:


Re: 515 market st

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 25, 2000 at 09:36:25:

In Reply to: 515 market st posted by Diane Wilson on August 24, 2000 at 12:42:17:

Pitt Potter's display fixture company first appears in the City Directories in 1908 as "Potter Fixture Company" on 515 Market street. It was listed as such until 1915, when it was started to be listed as "Pitt Potter Fixture Co." In 1927, the company was listed at 788 Mission, 4th floor. The last listing was in 1929.

-Ron


Follow Ups:


big parades

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 25, 2000 at 11:00:29:

In Reply to: largest/biggest "party" or "celebration" in SF history posted by David Asari on August 25, 2000 at 04:18:36:

I would think that the Gay Pride Parade is/was probably the biggest. According the Chronicle regarding the 2000 parade, "...Police estimated the crowd to be at least 750,000..." (SF Chronicle, June 26, 2000). The last biggest, recent single-event that I can recall was the welcoming parade for the 49ers when they won the super bowl in 1995; it was estimated that there were 250,000 people (during a Monday workday!) (Golden Gater, February 2, 1995).

-Ron

Follow Ups:


Oyster Saloons and Canneries

Posted by Linda Okazaki on August 25, 2000 at 13:43:39:

Would like to learn more of the oyster and canning industries of SF in the late 1800's. Have some info from directories. GG grandfather owned "oyster parlours" as well as oyster beds at oyster point and a cannery. Linda

Follow Ups:


Re: Vollmer House / August Vollmer

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 26, 2000 at 04:58:07:

In Reply to: Vollmer House / August Vollmer posted by Brendan Holly on August 19, 2000 at 01:26:33:

According to the San Francisco Architectural Heritage organization, the house was built for John Jacob Vollmer, a grocery store owner, and his wife, Anna Marie. The house was completed in 1886 and was originally located at 1773 Turk.

-Ron

Follow Ups:


Location of grave of Dona Concepcion de Arguello?

Posted by
Steve Knipp on August 27, 2000 at 00:15:29:

Hi all,
I'm an East Coast reporter filing a story on the Russians of San Francisco after a brief visit there recently and was told the story of the Rezanof & Concepcion. A Russian customer at a restaurant told me the story and so far all of it checked out. But he also told me that San Frnaciscans still place flowers on Concepcion's grave from time to time. Is that true? And if so, where exactly is the grave? and when would people place flowers there? any special anniversary? Many thanks for any information you can provide. Cheers! Steven Knipp, Washington DC

Follow Ups:


Doa Concepcion de Argello

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 27, 2000 at 09:46:26:

In Reply to: Location of grave of Dona Concepcion de Arguello? posted by Steve Knipp on August 27, 2000 at 00:15:29:

Zoeth Eldredge, in his "The Beginnings of San Francisco," states "...When the Dominicans founded their convent of St. Catherine at Benicia, Doa Concepcion entered that establishment, and there she died in 1858 at the age of sixty-seven." I would presume she was buried at the convent.

The full text of that particular story is available at: [http://www.sf50.com/sf/hbbegn5.htm#note27].

Follow Ups:


muny bait shop

Posted by
mike dempsey on August 27, 2000 at 13:22:31:

Have you seen or do you have a postcard or photo of the old Muny Bait shop at Northpoint and Polk ? the building is still there but is called Muni Liquors on the corner and a restaurant on the Northpoint side
thanks,
Mike

Follow Ups:


Re: Local Building Research

Posted by
Judy De Bella on August 27, 2000 at 16:48:02:

In Reply to: Local Building Research posted by Ron Filion on July 24, 2000 at 03:11:22:

Melinda,
It amy help your research to know that most of the Bayview/Hunter's Point area was once NOT part of San Francisco. The city boundaries of San Francisco did not go out that far. It was "originally" known as South San Francisco - NOT to be confused with the South San Francisco we know today. That is why the name of the Opera House on 3rd Street was originally the South San Francisco Opera House. In looking for records of your house, also remember that many of the street names were changed. There was originally a set of numbered Avenues as cross streets to 3rd Street (so Numbered Streets and numbered Avenues crossed each other.)These are now the area of Palou, Oakdale, Evans and out 3rd. Old City records (and directories) list addresses out there that way (like Oakdale Avenue was 15th Avenue). Old maps could help you get a correct street name.

Good luck!

Follow Ups:


Re: san quentin prison

Posted by
paula hanson on August 27, 2000 at 21:39:50:

In Reply to: Re: san quentin prison posted by Ron Filion on June 13, 2000 at 09:43:55:

i am trying to get the location of a friend that is in your san quentin prison.the only info i have is that his name is richard haynes about 6'4 brn hair prescrip glasses.born about 1963
i believe he gets out in 2 or 3 months. if you can help please let me know or any suggestions that will help my search thank you i need complete address .



Follow Ups:


Re: Laguna honda home

Posted by
Cathy on August 28, 2000 at 02:39:13:

In Reply to: Laguna honda home posted by ame reynolds on July 18, 2000 at 02:15:27:

My great grandmother and grandmother worked at the Laguna Honda Hospital. Is here a way to check employee records for info?
Thanks,
Cathy

Follow Ups:


Re: san quentin prison

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 29, 2000 at 03:33:44:

In Reply to: Re: san quentin prison posted by paula hanson on August 27, 2000 at 21:39:50:

I would recommend calling the prison directly. Their phone number is 415-454-1460.

Follow Ups:


Re: Laguna honda home

Posted by
Ron Filion on August 29, 2000 at 03:36:14:

In Reply to: Re: Laguna honda home posted by Cathy on August 28, 2000 at 02:39:13:

I would recommend calling them directly. Their phone number is 415-664-1580.

Follow Ups:


CYC, ca 1877

Posted by
Barbara Fussmann on August 29, 2000 at 22:08:26:

I have an old photograph of my g.-g. grandfather, about
17 -19 years old at the time; he is wearing what
looks like a sailor's shirt and a cap with the
initials "CYC" just above the brim, and just below the
initials is an anchor. Does anyone know what
organization this could have been? John Fletcher SIMS
was 17 at the time of his mother's death in 1877; this
is how I figured out about what time the picture would have
been taken.
Thank you for your attention.
Barbara

Follow Ups:


Re: CYC, ca 1877

Posted by
John Martini on August 30, 2000 at 02:33:33:

In Reply to: CYC, ca 1877 posted by Barbara Fussmann on August 29, 2000 at 22:08:26:

I believe the initials stand for "Corinthian Yacht Club", a sailing organization still active in Tiburon. However, that club wasn't founded until 1886. Any chance your g.g.father could have been a bit older in the photo thant 17?

John

Follow Ups:


Re: Doa Concepcion de Argello

Posted by
Grant73 on August 30, 2000 at 07:23:49:

In Reply to: Doa Concepcion de Argello posted by Ron Filion on August 27, 2000 at 09:46:26:

My readings seem to say that she transferred to San Rafael when Benicia's St. Catharine's was closed down, and died and was buried in S. Rafael. I'm too young to know for sure. :o)

Follow Ups:


RETURN TO INDEX
Return to San Francisco Genealogy
Public Commons License