San Francisco History
 

Buried Ships
Notes


The majority of what is known about the buried ships hidden under the streets of downtown San Francisco is from recollections of early day pioneers. Those major contributors included Charles Hare, Nicholas Bichard, George Howgate, and Fred Lawson. Portions of their recollections, along with those of other sources, are presented here.

The numbers in the brackets refer to the year in which the resource which mentioned the ship was printed (see Bibliography).

Miscellaneous:
(1) Lawson [90] stated, in reference to the ships he mentioned, that "Nearly all these vessels were sunk between '50 and '53."
(2) Clark street runs between and parallel to Jackson and Pacific.
(3) Oregon street runs between and parallel to Washington and Jackson.


Acasia — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Ada — lay near Broadway Wharf; "...was finally broken up by Hare." [82]

Adelaide — lay near Pacific Wharf. [82]

Alabama — near California street wharf. [82]

Albrey — near Long Wharf. "A storeship...was finally broken up." [82]

Alceste — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Broken up by Charles Hare. [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Alciope — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] Lay near Broadway Wharf; "...arrived here in December, '49, and was sold to Macondary; joined the fleet of Orary's storeships and was finally broken up by Hare." [82]

Alfred — "She was fitted up and went to China afterward. Charley Ruggles went in her, and states that she worked so badly that it was a miracle she made the voyage. She subsequently sailed hence for Sydney, and was never heard of afterward." [82]

Alhambra — near Long Wharf; "...coal hulk for the P.M.S.S. Co., in charge of the late M. B. Cox." [82]

Alida — "A white-painted ship...She lays on Davis street, between Washington and Jackson, and was owned before she sank by Ogden & Hayne, who sold her to Colonel Jones. He had her settled on his property. Two Norwegians brought her into port originally." [90]

Almandralina — lay near Pacific Wharf; "...on the corner of Pacific and Front, was owned at the time by M. R. Roberts...Venard's brick building to-day covers the site where she was cut out." [82] "The vessels lying at the corner of Pacific and Front streets are the remains of the ship Almandrilina — signifying almond grove — and the brig Ricardo. These vessels were owned by Captain M. R. Roberts, and were brought around the Horn early in '49, with full cargoes for the gold fields. The captain's young wife followed him in 1850, by way of the Isthmus, and Captain Roberts fitted-up the Almandrilina for her reception, until he completed the building of his handsome residence—at that time the finest in town—corner of Washington and Stockton streets, where they have resided every since, and where their children were born. The vessels were then converted into warehouses, and finally into boarding and lodging houses until the city front was filled in and buildings erected on top of the hulls as they lay covered up." [FM] "Venard, G., manufacturer...625-627 Front" [west side, between Jackson/Clark and Pacific.] [81]

Alsop — near Cunningham's Wharf; "Captain Sam Blair had the Alsop off Long wharf." [82]

Amelia — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] Broken up by Charles Hare. [82]

Andrew — a store hulk, "...did good service in storage..." [82]

Andrew Scott — near California street wharf. [82]

Ann — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57]

Ann Mary Ann — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "...did good service in storage..." Lay near Broadway Wharf. [82]

Ann McKim — "...a Baltimore clipper ship, did service for some time, and was finally taken to Valparaiso in 1851 by Captain Van Pelt, where she was broken up." [82]

Ann Perry — lay near Broadway Wharf; "...used for several years...became a lumberman and was lost." [82]

Anne Thorpe — "...did good service in storage..." [82]

Anna (2) — at least one lay near Pacific Wharf; "...were used for several years...and broken up by Hare." [82]

Antelope — "...at Commercial Wharf [Long Wharf], Clark's Point, with Captain M. J. Ashford the storekeeper. This vessel was an English iron steamer and came here under sail, arriving in July, '49. Being nicely fitted up she was used for some time as a lodging-house until finally ordered home to Liverpool." [82]

Apollo — "...brought here in 1849 by Captain Coffin, and lying at Long Wharf, was burnt in the May fire of '50." [82] "...lies on Front street between Commercial and Sacramento with her stern towards Front street, and is parallel with Sacramento. In '51 and '52 she was occupied for a boarding-house and restaurant, kept by Lawrence & Co. She was partly burned..." [90] "Larkin [places her]...at NW corner Sacramento and Battery." [BA] "Off Clay Street wharf in 1851 the ship Appollo [sic] was burned after her crew deserted and the hull was another wreck left in the harbor to become a shanty foundation." [DM] "...[suggested historical area to include:] From NW corner of Sacramento and Battery, thence due N 75', thence due W 200' to Sansome, thence due S to NE corner of Sansome and Sacramento 75' distant, thence 200' to beginning." 121 feet in length. [87]

Apthorp — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] A store hulk, "...came here from New Orleans. She was broken up by Charles Hare." Part of Charley Minturn's fleet of coal hulks off Cunningham's Wharf. [82]

Ark — lay off Jackson street. "The brig...one of the famous Cushing brigs, did duty for several years, but was fitted up and sent to sea." [82]

Ark — "Frank Middleton had C. K. Garrison's coal hulks..." [82]

Arkansas (aka Old Ship) — "A few months since, the old Arkansas which lay embeded broadside on Pacific street, was broken up, to make way for more substantial structures." [57b] "This vessel was a ship of 627 tons, and arrived here December 20th, 1849, Captain Shepherd (afterward the well known Judge, who died many years ago,) in command. She brought here from New York 75 male and 14 female passengers. She was previously a Liverpool and New Orleans packet ship, and Bill Joliffe, now a pilot here, was in her as second mate while in that service. On entering this harbor the Arkansas struck on Alcatraz, and Captain Van Pelt, at that time in the steamer Senator, was applied for assistance. He asked $2000, which was considered too high, and the ship finally was got off. The sum of $21,000 was paid for the ship at New York prior to her sailing. As the story goes, Captain Shepherd had not been ashore over fifteen minutes when he was elected Justice of the Peace, and stuck to the law from that time until his death. The ship was hauled up Pacific street, to near the northeast corner of Battery, and was used for many years as a store ship, and finally her forecastle was used as a tavern. A door cut in the bluff of her bow admitted the thirsty. A hotel was finally built over her, and she was ultimately sold by Edward Bosqui, agent for Palmer, Cook & Co., to Charles Hare, for $1000, to be broken up without disturbing the hotel. Unfortunately, the New York ex-Judge, who was superintending the breaking up of the vessel, let her float late one night, when she raised up under the ground floor of the of the hotel, and there was a young earthquake among the lodgers that night. She had to be scuttled and sunk again, and, if we mistake not, the quarterdeck and other portions of her are still there. Among her passengers were Sherrold D. Stone, at present statistician of the Merchants' Exchange, and James Lailin, well known along the wharves." [82] "At the northwest corner of Pacific and Front was for a long time a vessel that went under the name only of the 'old ship.' She was used for a large liquor store." [90] "The ship's timbers, uncovered a few days ago by the tearing down of the rookeries on the north side of Pacific street between Battery and Front, are those of the ship Arkansas...When the Chicago Hotel on Pacific street was built the old hulk was cut to pieces and sold for firewood, leaving only a portion of the stern, the timbers of which have now been uncovered. The hulk was used for years after her landing in the mud on Pacific street for purposes for which she was never intended. In fact there was a saloon in her forecastle, and the man who kept the bar is hale and hearty to-day, a well-known resident on Telegraph Hill, and once a member of the police force..." [FM] Broken up. [JB] "On the corner of Battery & Pacific streets a saloon was known as 'The Old Ship' was a popular lounging place in the old days. That place was giving [sic] its name because it was built over the ruins of the old bark Arkansaw [sic]..." [DM]

Auckland — "...owned by J. B. Thomas, was ultimately sold and broken up by...Don Nicolas Birchard..." [82]

Audley Clark — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Autumn — "...was a storeship, on Davis street, near Market, and was broken up by Hare." [82] A possible sunken ship appears on an 1853 map on Davis near Market (probably the Autumn). [53]

Bacchus — a brig "now fast disappearing." [57] Lay near Pacific Wharf; "...was also used and finally broken up by Hare." [82]

Balance — "This vessel arrived here November 23d, 1849, from New York, having on board forty-two male and five female passengers. E. M. Ruggles captain, John L. Durkes (at present Fire Marshall) her second mate, and Ben. Brooks owner and passenger. The Balance was a noted craft. She was built in Calcutta, of teak wood, and was 92 years old when she arrived here. She was captured from the British in the War of 1812 by James DeWolf's Yankee privateer True Blooded Yankee, who re-christened her the Balance to balance a ship lost by him a short time before captured by a British cruiser. On her arrival here the famous craft had the same masts in her that were put in when she was built, nearly a century before. She was a storeship on the corner of Front and Jackson streets. Charley Hare finished her at last and broke her up." Lay near Pacific Wharf and/or Broadway Wharf.  [82] "The vessel you refer to, which has been uncovered in excavating the cellar in Davis street near Jackson, is all that remains of the old full-rigged brig Balance, which arrived early in 1849 from New Bedford." [FM] "...went into the mud to remain at the corner of Front and Jackson streets." [DM]

Bay Slate — "...a schooner, was broken up." [82]

Bay State — a brig "now fast disappearing." [57] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Bazaar — was off Rincon Point, "...arrived here in February, 1850, Captain Lowell in charge, was also in use and left her bones here." [82]

Bethel — "...built at St. John's, after several years of service at the corner of Pacific and Drumm streets, was scuttled and sunk there." [82] "English ship...buried at the corner of Drumm and Clark streets. Her bow points toward Drumm. She cost me $450....she [was sank] on to Miller, Hough & Cassly's property..." [90] "...an English Vessel from St. Johns, New Brunswick was sunk at Drumm and Pacific Streets..." [DM]

Bingham — near California street wharf, "...an American ship of 375 tons, arrived here in October, 1849, and Wm. Irelan used her as a storeship. She was also broken up." [82]

Birmingham — "...took fire in the harbor in 1850, and after drifting around for some time, was sunk over between Goat and Sheep Island. A shoal was formed in her vicinity and was named Birmingham Shoal. The vessel was ultimately raised." [82]

Black Eagle — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] A brig near California street wharf, "...a British ship, which arrived here in 1851, was in the storage service until finally broken up by Geo. Howgate." [82]

Bordeaux — lay near Broadway Wharf, in stream; "...in charge of of Walter B. Cumming's brother, did good service as a store-ship. She was afterward fitted out and was lost on Columbia River Bar." [82]

Braemer or Bramah — "...one of Orary's fleet of coal hulks, was built of teak wood and was constructed by England for a cruiser after Malay pirates. After several years of service as a store-ship she was sold to Silas E. Burrows, who sent her off to Singapore." [82]

Brant — "...a Russian vessel with flour on storage, lay off Long wharf, Whitehead, Moorehead & Waddington owners."  [82]

Bremen — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Brilliant — "There are also lying close in proximity to these vessels [Balance and Globe] the brigs Magnolia and Brilliant, which were used for storage ships and boarding houses." [FM]

Brontes — "..was first a store-ship and was purchased by Adams & Blinn, who used her in the lumber trade. Nicholas Bichard ultimately bought her, a few years ago, and she got as for as Honolulu, when old age overcame her and she actually dropped to pieces." [82]

Bruner — broken up. [82]

Brunner — a store hulk. [82]

Burmah — was off Rincon Point, "...owned by Daniel Gibb, Captain Prentiss Crowell, now here, the keeper. She was also broken up by Hare." [82]

Byron — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Near California street wharf, " Geo. R. Ward had the old Byron on the corner of Market and Davis streets. She was also broken up." [82] "The bark Byron was broken up at Mission Street near Main street in the early fifties, the record discloses." [DM]

Cabot — lay near Broadway Wharf. [82]

Cadmus — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Was off Rincon Point. "Noted as being the vessel that brought Marquis de Lafayette to the United States in 1824, she was an American bark of 395 tons, and arrived here from Sag Harbor May 6th, 1850, Captain Fordham in command. She was used as a storeship and was broken up by George Howgate, who informed us a few days since that while performing that job the members of Lafayette Hook and Ladder Company came down and he gave them the brass cap over her rudder head, as well as several handsome pillars with which her cabin was adorned. These things ornamented their engine house for many years and are probably still there." [82]. "The hulk that lay in the bight at North Beach, between Meigg's Wharf and the sandy point, at the extremity of which were located once Selby's Smelting Works, was that of the Cadmus, used as an asylum for the insane until the founding of the institution at Stockton in 1851, after which she was used as a hospital for small-pox patients...The hulk lay for years in the cove at the point where Jones and Francisco streets now intersect, and finally in the sixties was broken up." [90b] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Caledonia — lay near Law's Wharf; "...one of Orary's hulks...broken up by Hare." [82]

Callao — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Was off Rincon Point, "...owned by Green, lay as a steamship on the corner of Mission and Beal, until finally broken up by Chas. Hare." [82] "On Davis near Market the Callao was cut up for her wood and copper." [90] "At Mission & Beale Streets, the Calleo was broken up and left there." [DM]

Calumet — near California street wharf. "...Tom Jones and his partner, James Fairlowl, had the storeships Calumet and Chileno; the former was broken up, and the latter afterward went to China." [82]

Camilla — a store hulk. [82]

Candace — a bark "now undergoing the dissection by the Chinamen and vanishing piecemeal." [57] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Canion — "The bark...owned by the late A. J. Pope, arrived here in 1850, Captain Crowell in command. She was used for some time, being owned at one time by Macondray and Co. She finally went to San Blas." [82]

Canonicus — a brig, "...one of Cushing's...", and a store hulk near California street wharf. [82]

Cariolanus — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Carib — "The Bark...was a hulk for some time, but was finally purchased by Tubbe and went to sea." [82]

Caroline Augusta — was off Rincon Point, broken up by Hare. [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Caroline Reed — "...were at the business also...broken up by Howgate...however, being on the coast for many years before the operation [breaking up] was performed." [82]

Cassilda — "...Phil Cadue had [her] off Horrison's Pier." [82]

Castella — A store hulk and broken up by Chas. Hare. [82]

Ceres — A brig and a store hulk "...broken up by Hare." [82]

Chalcedony — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57]

Charleston — lay near Pacific Wharf; "...laid [her] bones here..." [82]

Charlotte — was off Rincon Point, "...arrived here in 1849 with the late Ames Noyes?. She was owned by Daniel Gibb, who used her for storage a while and then sent her to Guayaquil, where she went ashore and was lost." [82]

Chase — "...of Salem...were at the business also...broken up by Howgate..." [82]

Cherokee — lay near Broadway Wharf. [82]

Chester — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] Lay near Law's Wharf; broken up by Hare. [82]

Chileno — "...Tom Jones and his partner, James Fairlowl, had the storeships Calumet and Chileno; the former was broken up, and the latter afterward went to China." [82]

Clarion — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57]

Clarissa — a store hulk and broken up by Chas. Hare. [82]

Congress — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] Lay off Jackson street; "...one of Orary's fleet of coal hulks, was finally broken up by Hare." [82]

Copiapo (aka Copiopo) — a brig "now fast disappearing." [57] A store hulk and broken up by Chas. Hare. [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Cordova — lay near Pacific Wharf; "...arrived here April 8th, 1850, was used as a storeship for some time and finally as a receiver for Saucelito water, with which the shipping in the harbor was supplied, two water boats, the Emma and Clara going around with it." [82] "...old bark...and I [Lawson] held to sink her. She was an American vessel and was bought by Captain Bowman from Goodall & Nelson for Palmer, Cooke & Co. Goodall & Nelson used her for a water ship, where vessels and housekeepers could get a suppy of good water. Water sold for $1 and $2 a bucket in those days."; "...both [Cordova and Garnet] were at last sunk, with my [Lawson] assistance, but the firm [Palmer, Cooke & Co.] failed to name the exact place where they were to rest. The mistake cost them an even $100,000, for they encroached upon land belonging to the Pacific and Broadway Wharf companies and were compelled to buy the whole block at that price. "; "...painted a lead color..."; unearthed on Davis street in 1890. [90] "The Bark Cordova in the early fifties was used to bring water from Sausalito to S.F. for domestic uses." [DM]

Corea — "...laid [her] bones here..." [82]

Coriolanus — "...after about a year's service, was fitted up and went off to the Sandwich Islands in charge of Captain Turner." [82]

Corsair — a brig and a store hulk. [82]

Corsair — a bark lay near Broadway Wharf. [82]

Corvo — lay off Jackson street. [82]

Crown Princess — "...a Hanoverian, came in here September 1st, 1849, with 65 passengers, from Panama. She struck on Blossom Rock and they run her over toward Goat Island, a little to the northward of which she sunk. Her spars were visible for several years after." [82]

Cyclops — "...lay for a long time between Jackson and Pacific streets, and afterward went to sea and was lost." [82]

Cyrus — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Dalmatia — near California street wharf; lay near Law's Wharf; "...lay off Cunningham's wharf, in Hartston and Chandler's fleet. She was brought here by Captain Bill Folger, afterward a pilot, and subsequently a partner of Tubbs. She was fitted out and went to sea." [82]

Damariscott  — "...owned by Minturn in early days, continued down to 1853 as a store-ship near Long Wharf..." [82]

Delia Walker — was off Rincon Point, "...struck up  Blossom Rock, and was run on the Beach; afterward used as a hulk, and finally broken up by J. Atkinson." [82]

Detroit — "...brig...near California street [wharf], Captain Nye in charge." [82]

Dianthe — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Near California street wharf, broken up by Hare. [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Disdem — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Domingo — "A Russian ship...was finally broken up by Bichard..." [82]

Donna Maria — near California street wharf. [82]

Dover — a store hulk. [82]

Dryade — "...near Law's wharf..." [82]

Duchess of Clarence — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] "...off Rincon Point...[broken up by] Hare." [82]

Duke of Wellington — "...was owned by Mr. Throckmorton, cousin of the Trockmorton of the present day. She was fitted out and went to Australia in 1852 with passengers." [82]

Edwin — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Lay near Pacific Wharf, built over; "In December, 1849, their [Gray & Easterby] ship...was purchased from Cross, Hobson & Co., was made a bonded warehousing ship by Collector Harrison and so remained until the Fall of 1850...[eventually] broken up." [82] "Cross, Hobson & Co., com. merchants, San b P[acific] and J[ackson]" [50]

Eleanor — near California street wharf. "They [Gray & Easterby] had also [the ship] Eleanor...commanded and half owned by Captain Gardner, now living in San Francisco. ...[The Eleanor] was used for several years to store Chile flour for the importing houses of W. Meyer & Co., Cramer, Rambach & Co. and Isaac Friedlander." [82]

Ellen Brooks — lay near Pacific Wharf. [82]

Elida — "...the Norwegian ship...laid off Jackson street." [82]

Elisa — "The bark...was finally broken up near Hashaway's [Hathaway's] Wharf." [82]

Elizabeth — near California street wharf, "[in] the Fall of 1850...Collector Collier made his own vessel, the Elizabeth, the bonded storeship for the port...[eventually] broken up." [82] "The first vessel I [Lawson] sank was the English bark Elizabeth. We gave $600 for her, and she now lies about 100 feet along East street, between Clay and Merchant. She is settled in about thirty-five feet of water." [90]

Elmira — "...was sunk by Captain Crowell at the corner of Pacific and Davis streets." [82]

Empress — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "The British ship...did store-ship duty near California street [wharf], and was broken up by Hare." [82]

Empress — "Frank Middleton had C. K. Garrison's coal hulks..." [82]

Envoy — "...one of Chandler's fleet, near Law's wharf, sunk near Vallejo street, but was raised and ultimately broken up by Hare." [82] "Officer Burns got his first pocket money from the the old bark Envoy and old whaler, which went down in the mud off Cunningham's wharf which in the early fifties ran out from Battery street between Valejo [sic] and Green streets. The Vessel went down north of Union street between Front & Battery streets and when the mud was squeezed up by filling Front street the old hulk reappeared and Burns stripped copper from the Hull selling the metal for 10 a pound." [DM]

Equator — "The ship...laid near California street wharf. This vessel was an old New Bedford whaler, and landed the first missionaries at the Sandwich Islands in 1823. On her arrival here she was bought by Daniel Gibb, who placed Captain Bill Morton, who is still with us, in charge. She was afterward sent to Costa Rica." [82]

Erie — "...sunk north of Goat Island." [82]

Euphemia — "On the sand-beach inside of where Selby's smelting works are now located, there was first to be seen, high on the sands, a short dump of a brig...used as a receptacle for the insane. She was housed over and furnished quarters to many of the poor unfortunates until the asylum was built at Stockton." [82] "Under the mud and silt dug out by the steam shovels at the corner of Battery and Sacramento streets, the remains of San Francisco's first jail are being brought to light...are unearthing the timbers of the old prison ship...Identification of the ship was made when it was remembered that she had once before been located, although not uncovered, when the elevator shaft was installed in the building that formerly occupied the corner of Battery and Clay. At that time part of the old ship was cut away to permit the excavation for the shaft. The hulk...lies upright in the mud, her bows pointing west. From the size of the stem, some three or four feet of which remain intact, and the slope of her sides it is evident that she must have been eighty or ninety feet in length. The timbers are much rotted, although the stem is in fair preservation...During excavations for other buildings in this district hulks have been discovered..." [21]

Falea — "...useful store-hulk..."; broken up by Hare. [82]

Fame — a brig "now fast disappearing." [57] "The brig...on the corner of Clay and Front streets, [was] broken up by Hare." [82]

Flavins — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Florence — lay near Broadway Wharf; "...was ultimately broken up by Hare." [82]

Fortuna (aka Fortune?) — a ship "now undergoing the dissection by the Chinamen and vanishing piecemeal." [57] "...was used for a period as a hotel on the block now bounded by Battery and Front, Vallejo and Green streets. She was finally broken up by Hare." [82]

Francis — lay near Pacific Wharf; "...the brig...did good service also as a store hulk." [82]

Francis Ann — "...on the corner of Clay and Front streets, [was] broken up by Hare." [82]

Francis du Pau — "Formerly a Havre Packet, owned by Judah Baker, at present a resident here, and a member of the firm of Stevens, Baker & Co., was used as a coal hulk, and as late as 1852 was moored near Long Wharf. She finally went to San Juan del Sur, where she ended her days." [82]

Franklin — "...off Rincon Point, also did good storage service until finally broken up." [82]

Friendship — "...off [Rincon Point] for several years, finally fitted out and went to sea." [82]

Galen — near California street wharf; "...was owned in 1850 by E. W. Travers, at present Pilot Commissioner of this port. She was moored on Market street, in the centre of six water lots owned by him. Like all the rest of the store-ships, she was the owner's home, and he lived aboard with his family, and his son, Charles E., at present a member of the legal profession and a prominent member of the Knights of Honor, first saw the light of day aboard the Galen. She was finally broken up..." [82]

Galileo — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Gallatea — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Ganges — "...lay moored near California street wharf, and owned by Mr. Renton, of the firm Renton, Holmes & Co. of the present day...", "the brig...off Jackson street, was broken up by George Howgate." [82]

Garnet — "...both [Cordova and Garnet] were at last sunk, with my [Lawson] assistance, but the firm [Palmer, Cooke & Co.] failed to name the exact place where they were to rest. The mistake cost them an even $100,000, for they encroached upon land belonging to the Pacific and Broadway Wharf companies and were compelled to buy the whole block at that price.  Just about fifteen feet in the rear of the Cordova lies the Garnet. She was an American brig that I [Lawson] paid Captain Morgan $400 for, and sold to Palmer, Cooke & Co." [90]

Garrett  — "...lay near Long Wharf..." [82]

General Castillo — lay near Pacific Wharf; "...was owned at different periods by Mel & Pool (the former gentleman still alive and well, here), Moorehead, Whitehead & Waddington and Isaac Friedlander. She lay off Pacific-street wharf for many years, and will be remembered by all old stagers as the big painted port ship with the windwill. She was used principally as a receptacle for flour." [82]

General Harrison — "The Gen. Harrison, whose bow was close up to the famous Niantic's stern on Clay street, was burnt up in the big fire. Her remains were afterward taken out and broken up by Hare." [82] "Opposite the Niantic, on the corner of Sansome and Clay, the large ship General Harrison rests in an angling position. This vessel was also used for a storage ship for a time." [90] "Larkin [places her]...at NW corner Battery and Clay." [BA] "...landed alongside in Sansome Street (The Niantic) of today with bow up close to the Niantic and was burned when the sister ship was destroyed by fire." [DM]

General Vesey — a store hulk, "...owned by Haight, was a storeship for several years and finally went in command of Captain Bunker to Sydney with 250 gold hunters and was sold there." [82]

Genessee — "...lay near California street [wharf]. Joe Goldsmith, now here, had her." [82]

Genette de Goito (aka Genetta de Goito) — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

George Ryan — near California street wharf. [82]

Georgean — "Larkin [places her]...between Jackson and Washington, west of Battery St." [BA]

Georgiana — "The Chilean ship...brought here by Captain Chase, did storage service and finally sailed for Callao, where she was condemned." [82]

Gilbert Jameson — was off Rincon Point. "The British brig...done good service for several years." [82]

Ginate de Gola — broken up by Hare. [82]

Globe — lay near Pacific Wharf; "...the old and well known Globe once owned by S. and W. Tams, and subsequently by J. Emeric. She was finally sunk, and her remains are now resting on Davis street, abreast of Lynde & Hough's store." [82] "...bought and cut up for wood and copper by Charley Hare in '51. He hired several Chinamen to do it, and he made a pretty good thing of it. Wood was scarce in those days. She had a large globe for a figurehead and was painted black." [90]  "In the street, and between the hull of the Balance and the corner of Oregon street, is the old hull of the brig Globe...used for a storage ship until turned over to the city and made use of by the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department Charles Duane, who converted it into a cistern for the storage of water to be used in case of fire." [FM] "Lynde, Hough & Co....416-418 Davis" [east side, between Washington/Oregon and Jackson.] [81]

Gloucester — "...owned by Starkey Bros. She had on board a lot of iron houses, with which she sunk November 19th, 1850." [82]

Golconda — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "...J. M. Taylor in charge, was off Rincon Point, and was broken up by Hare." [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Gold Hunter — was off Rincon Point, "...was used by Captain George Chase for a long time off Rincon Point, and was finally broken up..." [82]

Golden Age — broken up by Howgate. [82]

Gray — "...Hare finally finished [her]..." [82]

Gretry — broken up by Howgate. [82]

Grotius — lay in the vicinity of the Ganges (California street wharf). [82]

Hamilton — was off Rincon Point, a bark broken up by Howgate. [82]

Hardie — "About twenty feet from the Noble and directly opposite Clark street is the English brig Hardie. She was a large, fine vessel, and I bought her...for $800." [90]

Hardy — a brig near Long Wharf. [82]

Harrison — "...position was on Battery street, between Clay and Sacramento. She was afterward fitted out as a whaler and sold at Adelaide." [82]

Hartland — lay near Broadway Wharf; a British brig broken up by Hare. [82]

Harriet — broken up by Hare. [82]

Harvest — a bark "now undergoing the dissection by the Chinamen and vanishing piecemeal." [57] Near Long Wharf, broken up by Hare. [82]

Henry Ewbank — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] A store hulk, "Another one of their [Gray &Easterby] ships...was used for storing coal for the Howard line of steamers, for which they were the managers under the agency of Everett & Co. and subsequently of I. W. Raymond."  [82]

Henry Lee — "...lay for a long time on California street on the site now occupied by Selby's store. She was finally broken up by Hare." [82] "Selby, Thomas H. & Co....116-118 California" [north side, between Davis and Front] [81]

Huron — near Cunningham's Wharf, in stream. [82]

Hyconium — broken up by Howgate. [82]

Ianthe — near California street wharf; "...an old New Orleans and Liverpool packet, lay off Rincon Point..." [82]

Ida Ferris — "...a German vessel, laid at the foot of Jackson street. She was purchased by N. Bichard, who changed her name to the Louise, used her for storage for some time, and finally broke her up." [82]

Ilzaide — "...lay near California street wharf until broken up by Hare." [82]

Inez — was off Rincon Point, "...an old New Bedford whaler, lies sunk on Drumm street, close to the present Seaman's Bethel..." [82] "...[Lawson] bought her of Jim Fairfall and Tom Jones...she lies at the northwest corner of Pacific and Drumm streets on the line of Drumm, with her bow toward Pacific. The Pacific Wharf Company naturally didn't care to have the ship used by them spoiled, so when my men drove piles for buildings in the slip in the day-time they had them yanked out at night. I got a little tired of this, so one dark night I floated the Inez in, ran her up to where I wanted her and she was on the bottom in a few minutes. She was close in to the wharf that her short bowsprint struck the wharf as she was settling and broke short off. She sank so rapidly that one of my men had to swim for it and was almost drowned. The crash apprised the opposition of what was going on, but they were too late in finding it out to do any good." [90] "A New Bedford Mass, whaler named Inez sank on Drumm Street near the location of the Bethel in the fifties." [DM]

Iwanona — near California street wharf; "...was owned by Albert Dibblee, who is still with us. She was afterward a lumber droger." [82]

Izette — near California street wharf. "The schooner...was also used for some time and finally broken up by Hare." [82]

J. Mora Moss — "An iron bark was also moored in the vicinity [of the Euphemia], and was used for several years as a Marine Hospital...was purchased by Daniel Gibb, who fitted her out and sent her off to South America...her commander [was] the late H. J. O'Reilly." [82]

James — "...done good service as a hulk until broken up by Howgate." [82]

James Caskie — "...one of Cushing's brigs. She lay close to Mission street. On this vessel Stuart, the murderer, attempted a robbery, and nearly killed the captain and his wife in the attempt. For this he was apprehended, and, in company with another desperado named Jenkins, was hung by the Vigilance Committee." [82]

James Stuart — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "...[lay] off Jackson street. She was owned by Joseph Beidelman, Captain Coffin, storekeeper, and was finally broken up by Hare. This vessel was built in St. John's, and was, previous to her arrival here a whaler and commanded by Chandler B. Gardner, now alive in Nantucket. The alte Matthew B. Cox was a boy in her under Gardner on his first voyage to sea, and he often related the style in which he was disciplined with seven others on bread and water at the Bay of Islands when homeward bound, after a three years' cruise. The boys wanted one more day ashore, stopped below and refused to help get the anchor. Five minutes were given them to make up their minds. Refusing to come on deck at the end of that time, they were kept there three days on hard sack and water. Although Captain Cox did not relish the joke at that time, he used to tell it with good nature many years afterward to those circled around him at his quarters at the Pacific Mail Dock. Both Captain Cox and the old ships have passed away after many years of good service." [82]

Janet or Jeanette — "...laid at Clark's Point...was finished by Hare...said to be the only ship laying here when gold was discovered. Captain David Dring of London afterward went in her, by special permit, and brought the first cargo of lumber from the Columbia River for this port." [82]

Janet — a brig near California street wharf. [82]

Japan — "...laid near Pacific Wharf, and was owned by Joshua Norton." [82]

Japan — "...Captain Hoyt, uncle of Henry C. Hoyt, our present marine reporter, had the bark Japan, which was the first heaving down hulk used here, and — quite appropriately — the Pioneer was the first ship hove down by her. She was finally broken up by Batchelder at Cowell's wharf." [82]

Java — "...lay near Broadway wharf, afterward made a trip to sea, but finally came back and Hare broke her up." [82]

John Adams — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] "The brig...lay near California street wharf, and was broken up finally by Hare." [82]

John Brewer — lay near Pacific Wharf. "They [Gray & Easterby] had also [the ship] John Brewer...used for several years to store Chile flour for the importing houses of W. Meyer & Co., Cramer, Rambach & Co. and Isaac Friedlander...was sent to China under Captain Rooney and was burnt at the hands of the Chinese pardones." [82]

John Calvin — was off Rincon Point. [82]

John Munn — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57]

Josephine — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Lay near Broadway Wharf; "...settled [broken up] by Hare..." [82]

Joshua Munn — "...were settled by Hare..." [82]

Julia Helen — lay near Pacific Wharf. [82]

Justine — near Long Wharf; "...a French East Indianman. This vessel was also broken up." Ben Hartshorn and E. D. Chandler, managers for the California Steam Navigation Company moved aboard her after the sale of the Resolute. Part of Charley Minturn's fleet of coal hulks off Cunningham's Wharf. [82]

Lady Adams — a brig "now fast disappearing." [57] "The brig...lay off Rincon Point, was settled by Hare..." [82]

Le Baron — "...owned by Fairpool & Jonse, lay for a long time near Long Wharf, and finally sunk near North Point dock." [82]

Leonore — near Griffin's Wharf; "...lay off Vallejo street. She was bought by Tubbs, and was commanded by Captain Scammon for a time. She was afterward in the lumber trade, and made a voyage to China, finally coming home, and George Howgate took her and broke her up." [82]

Lindsays — "In August, 1849, Gray & Easterby (the latter A. Y. Easterby), now President of the California Portland Cement Company, inaugurated the storage of goods afloat, commencing business on the ship Lindsays." [82]

Louisa — "The schooner...lay a little to the north of the old Merchant's Exchange building, Battery street. This vessel was previously a yacht of the King of the Hawaiian Islands. She was brought here, did storage duty for a time and was sold to Captain Batchelder, our old time stevedore, who is still alive with us...He finally broke her up." [82] "old [Merchant's] Exchange Building, at the northeast corner of Washington and Battery streets..." [66]

Louise — a store hulk, brig? [82]

Lydia — "At the foot of King Street by Pier 42 lies the whaler...whose hull was discovered during sewer construction...Sewer project excavators hit the hull with heavy equipment and a section was removed under archeologist's guidance. It is now stored by the Golden Gate National Recreation Area...It appears that the vessel was beached and later buried when the seawall was built in the area. The ship's stern is six feet below the surface [says] Olmsted...was built in 1840...started out as a square-rigged ship, but redesigned as a barque in 1868...Reports in 1901 say that she was lying alongside wharf number three at Howard Street to be dismantled...at that point [her] life became a mystery...the site [was her] last resting place in 1907." [80]

Magnolia — "There are also lying close in proximity to these vessels [Balance and Globe] the brigs Magnolia and Brilliant, which were used for storage ships and boarding houses." [FM]

Mallory — lay off Jackson street. [82]

Manco — "...owned by Albert Dibblee, was burned down but was subsequently used as a storeship. She was fitted up afterward and went to sea." [82]

Margarsi — broken up by Hare. [82]

Maria — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57]

Marie — broken up by Hare. [82]

Martha — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "...lay near California street wharf. She was a London packet out of Nantucket in 1809, and was broken up by Hare." [82]

Martha Watson — was a storeship. [82]

Mason — "...lay in service off Jackson street. She was a Salem ship, and ultimately took a cargo of lumber to Australia." [82]

May Flower — "Captain Geo. Chase had the May Flower near California street wharf..." [82]

Meiser — "...Captain Cox in charge..." Broken up by Hare. [82]

Melan — "...after years of storing, was broken up..." [82]

Memnon — "...after years of storing, was broken up..." [82]

Mentor — was off Rincon Point. "In the Spring of 1850, Gray & Easterby, with Bolton & Barron, purchased the...Mentor, in which they stored quicksilver from Almaden." [82]

Mersey — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "...after years of storing, was broken up...done service near Law's wharf..." [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Minerva — off Sacramento street, broken up by Hare. [82]

Monsoon — was off Rincon Point, "...off Market street in charge of Chase..." Broken up by Hare. [82]

Montane — "...had been a French packet ship between New York and Havre in 1834?, was owned by Captain Watson. She was finally sold to W. Bichard, who broke her up." [82]

Montania — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57]

Montaso — near California street wharf, in stream. [82]

Monument — broken up by Hare. [82]

Morrison — near California street wharf, in stream; "...built by Stephen Girard for one of his China tea fleet, and became afterward the property of Spofford & Tileston of New York." Broken up by Hare. [82]

Mount Vernon — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Broken up by Hare. [82]

Muvoy — lay near Law's Wharf. [82]

Neptune — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Was off Rincon Point, "...after years of storing, was broken up..." [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Niantic — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "...at the corner of Sansome and Clay streets, where her old hulk forms the foundation of the hotel of the same name." [57b] "That brings us down to the famous old Niantic, previously one of Goodhue's China ships out of New York, and was subsequently fitted out at Warren, Rhode Island, for a sperm Whaler. Captain Cleveland was her Master and his two sons were first and second officers. She turned up at Payta in 1849 and found a communication there from the American Consul at Panama, Mr. Nelson, stating that there was quite an emigration from Panama to San Francisco. Having a good supply on board he went there, and having secured 280 passengers, 20 of whom were in the cabin, she set sail from there on May 1st. Lost one passenger on the voyage, and first made Bodega Head and arrived in San Francisco at 11 PM, July 5th. The try works formerly used for trying out blubber was the kitchen. Among the steerage stewards were A. C. Bradford, afterward a District Judge in an adjacent county, and other was Harry Hoag. Of her passengers several have since become very rich. A. A. Hyatt owned one of the finest ranches in Solano county. Joe Douglas became a prominent financier and capitalist in Placerville, and a Mr. Orowell a prominent flour dealer. C. E. McDonald, whose is now located on Leidesdorff street, was also a passenger. There were also on board four negroes with their Southern owners. Every one knows where the bones of the old craft lay under the Niantic building, corner Clay and Sansome. George Ward had her there as a store-ship for some time. The old craft settled there, when foundations were being made through her for building purposes, one of her pump logs was driven down for a pile, and when well down it struck a stream of water, which formed an artesian well and supplied the inhabitants with water for several years..." [82] "I helped haul the ship Niantic in and sink her at the northwest corner of Clay and Sansome in the fall of '49. There is a house built over her now. Her bow is toward Montgomery. She was used as a hotel for a long time. A hollow pile was driven down through the stern below the salt-water line and about the best water in the town was pumped from that well..."; partly burned. [90]  "Larkin [places her]...at NW corner of Sansome and Clay." [BA] "Workers excavating for the new Pacific Mutual Building at Clay and Sansome streets began finding hunks of old timber last week, but it wasn't until yesterday they were certain of what they had found - the hull of one of the original Gold Rush ships, the Niantic..." [78] "...[suggested historical area to include:] commencing at a point 100' W of corner of Clay and Sansome on sidewalk line of the N side of Clay, thence 50' due N, thence 90 degrees W, thence 90 degrees due S 50' to Sansome, thence 90 degrees due E 50' to point of beginning." 15 percent of vessel, bow, undisturbed in adjacent lot; 119½ feet in length. [87]

New Orleans — one of the Howard line of steamers. [82]

New World — one of the Howard line of steamers. [82]

Noble — "...lay for years off Clark's Point." [82]  "She was used as a storage ship...can be found somewhere in the block bounded by Pacific, Jackson, Davis and Drumm streets, with her bow near Pacific. She cost me $500." [90]

Nonpareil — "...performed storage duty until finally broken up by Hare." [82]

Northener — one of the Howard line of steamers, "...whose sad fate in later years will ever be sorrowfully remembered by old Californians." [82]

Ocean Bird — "...afterward became a lumberman." [82]

Ohio — lay near Pacific Wharf. [82]

Onyx — near California street wharf. [82]

Oporte (aka Oporto) — a brig "now fast disappearing." [57] Broken up by Hare. [82]

Orator — "The British bark...Captain Tate, arrived here early in 1850 from Australia, after a long and eventful passage, during which she struck on the Marquesas. Among her passengers were the Mitchell family, including the late Wm. Mitchell, Tax Collector, who will long be remembered for his good and manly qualities; James is is at present an attache of the Alta California; John, the younger brother, and three sisters, all of whom are much respected; Jordan, who built the foundation for St. Mary's Cathedral, was also a passenger, and also Mr. and Mrs. Boytie. The Orator lay as a storeship for several years near California-street wharf." [82]

Orion — lay near Law's Wharf. [82]

Orpheus — "...Captain Freeman, now of the firm of Freeman & Baker, arrived here from New York July 8th, 1849, with 195 passengers. She was used as a storeship for some time, and was finally sold to the late John S. Manson." [82]

Othello — lay near Law's Wharf, in stream; "...brought out here by Captain J. Galloway. Mr. Hart took her and used her as a storeship on Steuart street." [82] "Hart, Michael, drayman, corner Mission and Stewart." [62]

Palestro — "...previously a Havre packet, came here as the St. Joseph, and was broken up by Hare..." [82]

Palladium — "...[lay] near Long Wharf." [82]

Palmyra — "Inside of India Dock, or what is now Battery, between Greenwich and Filbert, was a small brig...Her position was about what is now the corner of Battery and Greenwich streets." [82] "Historian Roger Olmsted...research has tentatively identified the vessel [in Levi's Plaza] as either the Palmyra, a two-masted, square-rigged, 145-ton brig from London, or the William Gray, a 285-ton, three-masted, full-rigged sailing ship from Bath, Me..." [79]

Panama — a ship "now undergoing the dissection by the Chinamen and vanishing piecemeal." [57] "The Panama was first owned by Macondray & Co., who sold her to Father Taylor and Mr. Hillman. They converted her into the Seamen's Bethel, for which she was used for many years, until finally some parties who did not have the fear of God in them, stole all the pews one fine night, and others carried off the pulpit, and that ended the conversion of sinners on the water front. She was finally broken up by George Howgate." [82] "[there was]...a Methodist Church in the Panama, on Davis street, between Washington and Clay, and Father Taylor was the minister. He had a real pretty wife and I think that was the reason that the boys chipped in so liberally. We paid Dr. Smith $300 for the space taken up by the ship, and helped the preacher out besides. When religious services were no longer held there she was taken to Beale and Mission and cut up." [90] "Macondray & Co. bought her, and later she was beached at the foot of Sacramento street and turned into a church for the Seamen's Bethel Society...In the winter of 1852, she was destroyed in a water-front fire." [99]

Pantheon — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Near California street wharf; broken up by Hare. [82]

Patriot — "...lay off Jackson street." Broken up by Hare. [82]

Pembroke — "...E. S. Porter in charge, did good service..." [82]

Pera — "...lay near California street [wharf]..." [82]

Persia. [82]

Peru — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57]

Philip Hone — "There was also, a little to the south of Union street and near Flint's warehouse, a store-ship. The last we remember of her was her gradual covering up by the filling in. The warehouse adjoining is still in the same position it was twenty five years ago, filled in all around, and may now properly be called a basement..." "She came here under the command of Ben Mitchell, brother to Dave and James Mitchell. Both Ben and Dave died many years ago, and James is still a resident here. The vessel was named after the Mayor of New York. She was 500 tons register, and carried royal stunt sails, Peterson mate, and J. H. Rogers, now a pilot here, second. She brought one hundred people here, including Fred Barker, a supercargo, and his wife, who, with Rogers and a man named Buttenup, now keeping a grocery store, are the only known survivors. The vessel was one of the first built by the since celebrated builders, Westervells. The houses on Union street, opposite the Union street school, owned by Samuel O. Nathan, formerly a pilot, came out in this vessel." Lay near Law's Wharf. [82] "Flint, Bixby & Co, proprietors...Flint's Warehouse, southwest corner of Battery and Greenwich." [81]

Piedmont — "...owned by Phil Caduc, lay off Harrison's Pier." [82]

Pilgrim — near Long Wharf. [82]

Pioneer — "...was the first ship hove down by her [Japan]." [82]

Pleides (aka Pleiades) — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] Lay off Jackson street, broken up by Hare. [82]

Plover — a bark "now fast disappearing." "We were shown her figure-head, representing a serpent, which is preserved as a curiousity at Hare's store..." [57] "...H. B. M. ship Plover, which arrived here October 27th, 1854 from Pt. Clarence, Arctic Ocean. She had been in the Arctic searching for Sir John Franklin, and had been absent from England for seven years. During the greater portion of that time she had been wintered in the Arctic until relieved by H. B. M. ship Enterprise, which vessel had been three years in the Arctic herself on the same mission as the Plover. Among the officers of the Plover were Captain Maguire, Lieutenant C. E. H. Vernon, Mate B. Hobson, Surgeon John Simpson, Second Mate Thos. A. Hall. Plover Bay was discovered by and named after this ship. On her arrival here she was sold at auction and purchased by Chas. Hare and Moore & Folger and was broken up by the former. She proved a bonanza to him, as he bought out Moore & Folger and cleared fully $20,000 on her. She was a great curiousity, being actually a double ship, or a ship within a ship, being fully seven feet thick in some places. Every nail was copper, and some of the sheathing of copper weighed from 75 to 80 pounds." [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Polynesia — broken up by Hare. [82]

Potomac — lay near Pacific Wharf, in stream. [82]

Powhatten — "...after a long year, was broken up by Howgate." [82]

Prescott — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57]

Prince de Joinville — "...afterward went to the Ohinchas, where she was condemned." [82]

Ralph Bernal — near California street wharf. [82]

Regulus — a ship "now undergoing the dissection by the Chinamen and vanishing piecemeal." [57] "...[Lay] off California street [wharf, in stream], was broken up by Hare." [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Resolute (aka Resolutis) — near Cunningham's Wharf; a flagship for the California Steam Navigation Company. "a Dutch vessel...They [Ben Hartshorn and E. D. Chandler, managers for the California Steam Navigation Company] lived aboard her until she was sold and broken up."  Part of Charley Minturn's fleet of coal hulks off Cunningham's Wharf. [82]

Rhine — a store hulk and a brig. [82]

Rhode Island — was off Rincon Point, "...Captain Chase and McKay had the Rhode Island off Rincon Point until sold and broken up by Hare." [82]

Rhone — "...Captain Benjamin Hill and John M. Finley, supercargo, arrived here in the Fall of '49, importing the first Chinese passengers from Hongkong. She was afterward used as a storeship near Law's wharf." [82]

Ricardo — "The vessels lying at the corner of Pacific and Front streets are the remains of the ship Almandrilina — signifying almond grove — and the brig Ricardo. These vessels were owned by Captain M. R. Roberts, and were brought around the Horn early in '49, with full cargoes for the gold fields...The vessels were then converted into warehouses, and finally into boarding and lodging houses until the city front was filled in and buildings erected on top of the hulls as they lay covered up." [FM]

Richmond (2 ships) — at least one lay near Broadway Wharf; broken up by Hare. [82]

Robert — lay off Jackson street. [82]

Robert Rolla — near Cunningham's Wharf. [82]

Rojah — "...one of Orary's fleet, a teak-wood ship, afterward fitted out and went to China." [82]

Roland — near California street wharf. "Frank Middleton had C. K. Garrison's coal hulks..." [82]

Rome — "...of Salem..." [82]

Rome — "a big Russian hulk that cost me [Lawson] about $1,000...used for a coal ship and sunk...at the southwest corner of Market and East streets, under where the Ensign saloon was. Her bow touches the edge of Market street. I sank her for Joseph Galloway..." [90] "Project workers digging a tunnel near the Ferry Building discovered what appears to be the remains of a 200-foot Gold Rush-era ship...tunnelling crews...hit the hull of the ship during digging...project archeologists believe that the ship is either the Roma or Othello...the ship was unearthed about 35 feet underground in an area that was once known as Yerba Buena Cove...Initial surveys indicate that the ship may be close to 200 feet long, with a 30-foot beam..." [94]

Rose (aka Rosa?) — a brig near Griffin's Wharf. [82]

Rowena — "...was at Panama in '49 and was afterward a lumberman, owned by Capt. Bob Simpson, Captain Thomas master. She was finally lost between Liverpool and New Orleans." [82]

Russell — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] Broken up by Hare. [82]

Sacramento — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "The new bark...brought a load of coal from Australia in 1850 to Macondray & Co. Balch of Boston sent her here, and Charley Hare finished her by breaking her up." [82]

Salem — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Lay near Broadway Wharf; owned by John Wade and "...lay for several years on California street where Hooker's store now is. Gamage, afterward pilot, had her. She was broken up by Hare." [82] "Hooker & Co....117-119 California" [south side, between Davis and Front.] [74]

Sange — "...owned by Beverly G. Saunders..." [82]

Sarah Sands — One of the Howard line of steamers, "...the chartered screw steamer...[which] occupied 364 days in the passage from the East." [82]

Sela — a storeship "...broken up by Howgate." [82]

Sisters — brig owned by John Wade. [82]

Sonora — a bark "now fast disappearing." [57] Steamer broken up by Hare. [82]

Star of China — "...first owned by James Estelle, was afterward a steamer, and was lost on Coos Bay bar." [82]

Steigletz — "Bob Bonnett had the old Steigletz on the south side of Washington street at a rental of $125 a month. She was also broken up by Hare." [82]

Sulla — "The brig...[, once a storeship, was] owned by Folger & Tubbs...broken up by Howgate." [82]

Sultan — "...a New York and Charleston packet..." [82]

Superior — broken up. [82]

Susan Abigail — "...first a store-ship and afterward owned by Paul Corno. She was burnt in the Arctic by the rebel propeller Shenandoah during the Rebellion." [82]

Susan Drew — "...owned by Cross & Co., lay at the foot of Sacramento street...went to sea afterward." [82]

Susan Sturgess — "Another of Easterby's vessels...was sent to Queen Charlotte's Island on a gold hunt under Captain Rooney. She was taken by the natives and burnt." [82]

Talca — a brig "now fast disappearing." [57] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Talma — lay near Pacific Wharf, in stream. [82]

Tartar — lay near Pacific Wharf. [82]

Tecumseh — "...on the southwest corner of California and Battery streets...sold by the United States Marshall and broken up." [82]

Thames — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "...near Cunningham's wharf, owned by McKenzie & Thompson, was broken up by Howgate..." [82] "Among the sepulchred vessels..." [BA]

Threcian — was off Rincon Point. [82]

Thomas Bennett — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] "...Nathan Simmons, keeper, on Sacramento street, built over and was finally broken up by Hare." [82] "The ship...contained a a grocery store. She is at the southwest corner of Sacramento and Front, with a building over her. She lies parallel with Sacramento with her bow pointed towards Battery street. A similar well was put down through her as the Niantic, but the water was not so good." [90]

Thomas Jones — near Long Wharf. [82]

Tobacco Plant — "This vessel was originally built by Stephen Girard for his own use. She was 270 tons and her 'tween decks 4 1/2 feet high. She was sent to the south seas whaling, and was abandoned there [and] was picked up by the United States expedition to the Antarctic under Commodore Wilkes, and taken by them, to Sydney, where she was fitted out and brought here. Mr. Morgan, now here, was her first owner in this city. He sold her to George Howes & Co., and both George and Jabez lived on board. O. W. Spencer, father of Mr. Spencer at present in the employ of John Rosenfeld, had charge of her during the time she was used as a storeship in the vicinity of Cunningham's wharf." [82]

Tonquin — "...inward bound with a valuable cargo, struck on the shoal now known as Tonquin Shoal, and became a total loss." [82]

Treaty — "The brig...at Clark's Point, owned by Whitman & Salmon...sold by the United States Marshall and broken up." [82]

Trescott — near California street wharf; "...corner of Main and Mission, Goss & White, owners, and Captain L. L. Batchelder, keeper, was finally broken up." [82] "Goss, White and Co., 98 Battery." [54]

Triton — "...useful store-hulk..." [82]

Tuskena — near Long Wharf. [82]

Ugarte — "Frank Middleton had C. K. Garrison's coal hulks..." [82]

Utica — "...lay off Clay-street wharf until she took fire and went over to the northward of Goat Island, where she sank." [82]

Valhalla — "The Hazard Powder Company had [her]..." [82]

Vitula — "...one of Chandler & Hartsborn's fleet, was finally broken up..." [82]

Washington — steamer broken up by Hare. [82]

Windsor Fay — "...lay at the foot of Sacramento street..."; broken up. [82]

William Brant — "...in the stream near Long wharf." [82]

William Gray — "...did good service near Griffin's wharf..." [82] "Historian Roger Olmsted...research has tentatively identified the vessel [in Levi's Plaza] as either the Palmyra, a two-masted, square-rigged, 145-ton brig from London, or the William Gray, a 285-ton, three-masted, full-rigged sailing ship from Bath, Me..." [79]

York  — near California street wharf. "They [Gray & Easterby] had also [the ship] York...used for several years to store Chile flour for the importing houses of W. Meyer & Co., Cramer, Rambach & Co. and Isaac Friedlander." [82]

Zuid Pool — a ship "now fast disappearing." [57] Was off Rincon Point, in stream; "...one of Hartshorn & Chandler coal fleet, was an old Dutch vessel, and was also broken up by Hare." [82]

unknown Bark — "...on Battery street, near Jackson. No one remembers her name. When Adams & Smiley got the contract to fill in that location they engaged Batchelder to move her." [82]

unknown Brig — "A brig on the corner of Battery and California streets was closed in and our new-comers will be astonished on passing over that spot to reflect that there is a vessel buried beneath them." "The Bay Hotel, near the southeast corner of Battery and California streets, was built on a brig, name unknown. She was filled in. The Bay Hotel was for many years the favorite resort for ship masters, pilots and water-dogs in general." [82]

unknown Brig — "One of Cushing's brigs...was in the same locality [as the Euphemia]...and was used as a prison...The prison brig was taken to San Quentin when the prison was built there." [82]

unknown Ship — "Some time since we noticed the fact that a large portion of Griffin's wharf is most ingeniously constructed by planking over a sunken hulk. We understand that the owners have it in contemplation to carry out the wharf two ships length farther by means of the same admirable contrivance..." [52]

unknown Ships — four possible sunken ships appear on an 1853 map at (1) on Davis, near Market (probably the Autumn); (2) on Market, near Davis; (3) on Market, between Beale and Fremont; and, (4) on Market, near Beale. [53]


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