*** Source: Record of Eighty-sixth Company California Military Reserve; San Francisco?: unknown, 1920?, 37 pgs. Notice: This data is donated to the Public Domain by TAG, 2004, and may be copied freely by anyone to anywhere. *** ---page 13--- he refused to recommend the appointment of headquarters officers for that battalion. In several cities of the state there were either sate-owned armories, or armories that had been rented by the state, and the Home Guard companies in these cities made unsuccessful appeals to The Adjutant General for use of the armories for the purposes of assembly and drill, except in San Francisco where permission for use of the State Armory was given to a number of organizations, none of which at the time belonged to the Home Guard. Although The Adjutant General, by authority of the Governor, had promulgated regulations for the organization and discipline of the Home Guard, there was no appropriation for supervision of the companies. The Adjutant Generalís office was swamped with work connected with the draft so that only the most perfunctory attention could be given matters pertaining to the Home Guard. In this situation officers of the Home Guard to the number of forty-five and representing thirty companies met at Sacramento on September 21, 1918, pursuant to a call made by Captain E. A. Brown of the Ninth Company to discuss matters of interest to the Home Guard with a view to making it a more effective organization. A permanent organization was effected and the following were elected officers: Captain Brown President and Captain Sharpsteen Vice-President, who with Captain Baldwin of the Tenth Company, Captain Curson of the Second Company and Lieutenant Hubbard of the Fiftieth Company constituted the Executive Committee. The following resolutions were adopted: *** end ***