*** Source: History and Business Directory of Humboldt County, Lillie E. Hamm, November 1890, Eureka, Cal. *** ---page 047-- HISTORY OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY 47 times triple blocks are needed to roll them out of their beds. Nor will any ordinary teamster answer to handle the cattle. He must be a man of judgment and skill. The best teamsters command a salary of $100 to $150 per month. The "bull whacker" is usually the highest priced man in camp. Once in the road, several logs are fastened together to make a "train," and are hauled to a landing to be loaded on the cars, or to the stream to be floated to the mill. The train of logs once started, there must be no stopping if it can be avoided. All along the road are stationed barrels of water. As the train moves a man runs along beside it, and, filling and refilling his pail from the barrels, throws water in front of the train, that there may be as little friction as possible. The loads hauled are sometimes enormous. One train of seven logs hauled on Humboldt Bay in 1887, by A. A. Marks, teamster, with five yoke of oxen, scaled, collectively, 22,500 feet, board measure, of merchantable lumber. No wagons are used in the woods; the logs are simply "shaked" on the ground. Until within the last few years, all this labor of handling logs in the woods was done with cattle, but now they are in many places using steam for the purpose. The machine used is "Dolbeer's Patent Steam Logging Machine." It consists of an upright boiler and engine, somewhat similar to a portable hoisting engine except that instead of a reel to wind the rope on, it has two "gypsy heads" one on each end of the reel shaft. It sits on a strong frame, the sides of which are like sled runners. It has a strong purchase from the engine to the "gypsy" shaft. To move the machine around in the woods they run a line ahead, make it fast to a tree or stump, take two or three turns around the "gypsy" and start up the engine. In this way it hauls itself wherever wanted. When the machine is in place it is made fast to a tree or stump, and a line run to the log to be removed, and by means of snatch-blocks the log is hauled in any direction desired. By the use of this machine heavy logs are brought out of ravines and bad places where it would be almost impossible to get them with oxen or horses. The wooden railroad or tramway, is used in many places for transporting the logs to the stream, or to the mills, but as the more accessible timber is being cut off these are being supplanted by iron and steel rails and locomotives. Our redwood mills are generally up to the times. All the modern improvements of double circulars; gang saws, pony saws, gang edgers and trimmers are in use. While double circulars are used in nearly all the redwood mills, many mills on Humboldt Bay are using, besides, what is called "Evansí third saw." This is a saw hung on a horizontal arbor above the double circulars, and cuts down from the top of the log to a little below the arbor of the middle saw. While, of course, it is parallel to the two lower saws, its cut is made four inches out further into the log. Besides this saw there is a fourth smaller saw which is hung on a perpendicular arbor and makes a horizontal cut into the log just at the bottom of the cut made by the third saw. The effect of running these two saws is to rabbet out a piece extending from the top of the log to a little below the arbor of the middle saw. These three large saws are usually from sixty to sixty-four inches in diameter and mills thus arranged can cut logs eight feet in diameter. Larger logs must be split. [ad] Gibbard & Lever DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF Furniture Cor. Third and H Streets, Pioneer Building, Eureka [ad] ---end---