San Francisco 1906 Earthquake Marriage Project
by sfgenealogy.com

In the news. . .

DIRECTORY

Married. Oakland Enquirer, 21 April 1906, page 6.
Many Weddings Follow The Terrible Catastrophe. San Francisco Bulletin, 21 April 1906, page 8.
Disaster As Aid To Cupid. San Francisco Bulletin, 23 April 1906, page 8.
First Official Wedding. San Francisco Bulletin, 23 April 1906, page 4.
Cupid Is Busy Across The Bay. San Francisco Bulletin, 24 April 1906, page 6.
Wedding of Miss Mabel Reed. Oakland Tribune, 24 April 1906, page 16.
Eagles Conduct Calamity Wedding. San Francisco Bulletin, 24 April 1906, page 7.
Brings Bride From Earthquake. Portland Oregonian, 24 April 1906, page 1.
Earthquake Hastens Pretty Girl's Wedding. San Francisco Bulletin, 25 April 1906, page 3.
Reunited By Earthquake. Portland Oregonian, 26 April 1906, page 3.
Miss McKenna Changes Plans for Her Wedding. Oakland Enquirer, 26 April 1906, page 6.
Marriage Was Postponed. Reno Evening Gazette, 26 April 1906, page 3.
Demand For Marriage Licenses Continues.San Francisco Bulletin, 27 April 1906, page 6.
Quiet Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 27 April 1906, page 17.
Another Couple Wanted to Marry. Oakland Enquirer, 27 April 1906, page 7.
Sentiment Amid Ruins. Marriages Resulting from Common Woe. Los Angeles Times, 27 April 1906, page 17.
Pretty Actress Becomes Bride. San Francisco Bulletin, 27 April 1906, page 1.
Quake Hurries Wedding Bells. Los Angeles Times, 27 April 1906, page II 14.
Refugees Will Marry Here. Chicago Daily Tribune, 27 April 1906, page 2.
Wedding Is Announced. Oakland Enquirer, 28 April 1906, page 12.
Married. Oakland Enquirer, 28 April 1906, page 2.
Calamity No Bar to Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 28 April 1906, page 9.
San Francisco Orders Wedding Rings. New York Times, 28 April 1906, page 1.
Determined to Wed Anyway. Oakland Tribune, 29 April 1906, page 12.
W. R. Fontaine Takes A Bride. Oakland Tribune, 29 April 1906, page 4.
Judge Busy With Marriages. San Francisco Call, 29 April 1906, page 9.
June Wedding Was Hastened By Quake, San Jose Mercury Herald, 29 April 1906, page 15.
Weddings. Oregonian (Portland), 29 April 1906, page 27.
Marriage License Business Shatters All Records. San Francisco Bulletin, 30 April 1906, page 2.
Cook Wedding Feast in Street. San Francisco Chronicle, 30 April 1906, page 1.
Marriage List Still Grows. San Francisco Bulletin, 01 May 1906, page 6.
Many Eager to Marry. Oakland Tribune, 01 May 1906, page 5.
Marriage License Office Busy Despite The Fire. San Francisco Call, 01 May 1906, page 15.
Wed In Berkeley; Off For Denver. Oakland Tribune, 01 May 1906, page 5.
Dr. Hemphill Takes A Wife. Cupid Still Busy, Defying All Disasters. San Francisco Call, 01 May 1906, page 4.
Berkeley Couple Take Hymen's Vows. Oakland Tribune, 01 May 1906, page 4.
Fire and Quake Hinder Not Love. San Francisco Bulletin, 01 May 1906, page 6.
Cabaniss Marries Seven Couple. San Francisco Call, 01 May 1906, page 8.
They Married In Haste After The Earthquake. San Jose Mercury Herald, 01 May 1906, page 5.
Offers to Wed Homeless Girl. San Francisco Chronicle, 01 May 1906, page 20.
Says Fellow Refugee Has Taken Wife. Oakland Enquirer, 02 May 1906, page 5.
Love Smites Fleeing Pair. Oakland Tribune, 02 May 1906, page 14.
Married. Oakland Tribune, 02 May 1906, page 17.
Takes A Bride. Oakland Tribune, 02 May 1906, page 5.
Oakland Girl Weds. Oakland Tribune, 02 May, page 6.
Pretty Wedding at Berkeley Home. Oakland Tribune, 03 May 1906, page 13.
Advance Date of Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 03 May 1906, page 9.
Want Ad. San Francisco Call, 03 May 1906, page 6.
Popular Elk Claims a Bride. Oakland Tribune, 03 May 1906, page 16.
Romance of the Flames. Oakland Tribune, 03 May 1906, page 14.
Wed Despite Disaster. San Francisco Call, 03 May 1906, page 8.
Offers To Wed Homeless Girl. San Francisco Chronicle, 03 May 1906, page 19.
Earthquake Hastens Nuptials. Oakland Enquirer, 04 May 1906, page 9.
Marriage Service Performed Under Difficulties. San Francisco Examiner, 04 May 1906, page 4.
A Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.
Wedding Cards. Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.
Downing-Truby. Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.
Quiet Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.
Wedding News. Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.
Marriage Licenses. San Mateo Times-Gazette, 05 May 1906.
Marriage Licenses. Oakland Tribune, 05 May 1906, page 22.
Knight Dunlap Takes A Bride. Oakland Enquirer, 5 May 1906, page 5.
Otto Tum Suden to Marry. Oakland Enquirer, 05 May 1906, page 9.
Earthquakes as Matrimonial Agents. Oakland Tribune, 05 May 1906, page 8.
Wedding Hurried By Earthquake. Oakland Tribune, 06 May 1906, page 6.
Married on Day of Quake. San Francisco Call, 06 May 1906, page 11.
Bride Insists on Being Married in Golden Gate Park. Oakland Enquirer, 07 May 1906, page 5.
More Applications for Refugee Wives. Oakland Enquirer, 07 May 1906, page 2. [article]
Miss Edna Cunard Becomes a Bride. Oakland Tribune, 07 May 1906, page 5.
Willing To Become Martyr In Cause of Matrimony. San Francisco Bulletin, 07 May 1906, page 5, photograph. [article] 
Oakland Man Would Keep Pretty Girls At Home. San Francisco Call, 07 May 1906, page 8.
Weds Daughter of Major Horace Bell. Oakland Tribune, 07 May 1906, page 8.
Quiet Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 07 May 1906, page 4.
Davis-Murison. Oakland Tribune, 07 May 1906, page 4.
Pretty Girl Journeys From London to Oakland to Wed. San Francisco Bulletin, 07 May 1906, page 5.
Romance of The Great Earthquake. Oakland Enquirer, 08 May 1906, page 6.
Pomona Wedding. Oakland Tribune 08 May 1906, page 3.
Home Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 08 May 1906, page 5.
Pretty Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 08 May 1906, page 3.
An Engagement. Oakland Tribune, 08 May 1906, page 3.
Path of Roses For A Bride. San Francisco Bulletin, 08 May 1906, page 2.
George Barrington Claims A Bride. Oakland Enquirer, 09 May 1906, page 7.
Each Blushing Bride Gets A Large Red Rose. Oakland Enquirer, 09 May 1906, page 1.
Earthquake Shakes Them Together. Oakland Enquirer, 09 May 1906, page 6.
Engagement, Which Was Denied, Culminates in Marriage. Oakland Enquirer, 09 May 1906, page 2.
Cupid Ready For Business. Oakland Tribune, 09 May 1906, page 1.
'Quake Reunites Divorced Couple. Oakland Tribune, 09 May 1906, page 13.
Girls Coming From Camps. Los Angeles Times, 09 May 1906, page II 6.
San Francisco Girl Weds N.Y. Broker. Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 20.
Knows Not the Name of His Lady Love. Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 9.
Linguist to Marry College Girl. Oakland Enquirer, 11 May 1906, page 8.
Marriage. Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.
Wedding Date. Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.
Berkeley Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.
Quiet Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.
Quiet Wedding. Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.
Wedding Bells Ring At Newark. Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.
Menlo Park Occurrences. San Mateo Times-Gazette. 12 May 1906.
Wedding of Miss Marion Goodfellow And Stanley Moore. Oakland Enquirer, 12 May 1906, page 7.
Petaluma Young Lady Becomes Bride of Oaklander At Pretty Wedding. Oakland Enquirer, 12 May 1906, page 7.
Will Be Wedded This Evening At Home Of Bride. Oakland Enquirer, 12 May 1906, page 7.
Surprised Friends by Announcing Marriage. Oakland Enquirer, 12 May 1906, page 6.
Earthquake as Cupid. Oakland Tribune, 12 May 1906, page 24.
Earthquake and Fire, Marriage Promoters. Oakland Tribune, 12 May 1906, page 13.
Cupid Again At His Pranks. San Francisco Bulletin, 14 May 1906, page 3.
Cupid's Costumes Purchased Here. Sacramento Bee, 14 May 1906, page 5.
Oakland Girl Is Wedding Attendant. Oakland Enquirer, 16 May 1906, page 7.
Hastens West and Wins Girl of His Choice. 17 May 1906, page 3/
Were Twice Married to Hold Property. Oakland Enquirer, 17 May 1906, page 2.
Engagement of Talented Young Lady and Prominent Oakland Physician Announced. Oakland Enquirer, 17 May 1906, page 3.
Wedding Hastened by The Calamity. Oakland Enquirer, 17 May 1906, page 3, photograph.
Refugees Wed in San Jose. San Francisco Call, 17 May 1906, page 7.
Gasoline Helps Them Wed. Los Angeles Times, 18 May 1906, page II 12.
Marriage License Office Has Its Banner Month. San Francisco Call, 19 May 1906, page 9.
Busy Times for Cupid. Sacramento Bee, 19 May 1906, page 10.
Announce Marriage. Oakland Tribune, 19 May 1906, page 14.
Petalumans Are Married Again. Oakland Tribune, 19 May 1906, page 10.
Young Couple in the Ruins. Oakland Tribune, The Meddler, 19 May 1906, page 14.
Earthquake Ripened Love. Los Angeles Times, 20 May 1906, page I 1.
Weddings. Oregonian (Portland), 20 May 1906, page 27.
Secretly Married. Sacramento Bee, 21 May 1906, page 7.
Wedded in Church Ruin. Los Angeles Times, 23 May 1906, page I 3.
Married in Ruins of Frisco Church. Chicago Daily Tribune, 24 May 1906, page 4, photograph.
Wants Red Cross to Act as a Marriage Bureau. San Francisco Chronicle, 29 May 1906, page 8.
Two Refugees Married. Los Angeles Times, 07 December 1906, page II 9.
Doing Duty Wins Bride. Los Angeles Times, 04 January 1907, page II 11.
Cupid Busy at Earthquake. Chicago Daily Tribue, 05 June 1907, page 3.
Amedee Joullin Gets Married. Los Angeles Times, 05 June 1907, page I 3.
Fire Wedding Has Anniversary Celebrated Here. Oxnard Courier (Ventura Co., CA), 28 April 1911, page 3.
Romance of Great Fire Culminates in Wedding. Los Angeles Times, 15 June 1914, page I 2.
Sequence Chain Leads to Grave. Los Angeles Times, 29 June 1916, page I 10.
In the Spotlight. New York Times, 27 June 1926, page X 1.
'Quake Bride Recalls Honeymoon in Ruins. San Francisco Examiner, 15 April 1956, page III 1. [article]
Disaster Didn't Halt Romance. San Francisco Examiner, 15 April 1956, Smart Set Section, page 14.
Oaklanders Defied Quake, Went Ahead and Married, 17 April 1956, page 23E, photograph.
They Married Despite Disaster. San Francisco Chronicle, 18 April 1956, page 3, photograph.


Married.

Miss Bess Alline Mathews, a handsome woman of 26 years, who was residing on Bush street in San Francisco until the earthquake and subsequent fire swept away her home, on Friday, sought consolation in matrimony in this city. She was to have married last Wednesday the man of her choice, Mr. Theodore B. Lyman, auditor for the San Francisco Gas Consumers' Association. But the earth's disturbance and ensuing conflagration caused the couple to take refuge with friends in Alameda until today, when they came to Oakland, procured a marriage license, and then repaired to the residence of Deputy Sheriff Van De Mork, who united Mr. Lyman and Miss Mathews in marriage at one o'clock.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 21 April 1906, page 6.


Many Weddings Follow The Terrible Catastrophe.

Weddings in great number have resulted from the recent disaster. Women driven out of their homes and left destitute, have appealed to the men to whom they were engaged and immediately marriages have been effected. Out of the ruin and desolation happiness will spring and at some future date happy couples will refer to the San Francisco earthquake and fire as the date of the beginning of their wedded bliss.

Since the first day of the disaster, an increase in the number of marriage licenses issued was noticed by County Clerk Cook. This increase is getting greater and greater. This morning seven marriages licenses were issued in an hour. Cook himself has been on duty much of the time, as has his deputy Paul Wuthe, although no other business has been transacted.

"I don't live anywhere" is the answer given in many cases when the applicant for a license is asked where his residence is. "I used to live in San Francisco."

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 21 April 1906, page 8.


Disaster As Aid To Cupid

Disaster has acted as an aid to Cupid, and since the holocaust, hundreds of people have secured marriage licenses in this city and been united in wedlock. Misery loves company, and the weddings result. In many cases the prospective bridegrooms have not had the needed sum of $2 to pay for the marriage license, but relief has been given them and all who have asked for a license have been accomodated. Following is a list of the licenses issued since Wednesday:
[see Marriages Database]

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 23 April 1906, page 8.


First Official Wedding.

The first wedding officially solemnized by the Oakland Relief Committee took place in the directors' room shortly before midnight last night. Thomas Wren Billingslee and Ann Jane Kenerieber, two sufferers from the San Francisco fire were made one by the Rev. E. E. Baker, chairman of the Relief Committee. Mr. Billingslee had saved $1.20 and figured that it would cost $1.00 for a room for himself alone or the same amount for both, so concluded to get married.

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 23 April 1906, page 4.


Cupid Is Busy Across The Bay.

Deputy County Clerks Baker, Wollsey and Heaney were kept busy issuing marriage licenses today and Justice of the Peace Geary was kept continually employed in performing the marriage service. Four couples had to be denied licenses because they did not have the license fee of $2. As the County Clerk's office is pecunarily liable for all fees, the license fee cannot be remitted. The following licenses were issued today:

[see Marriages Database]

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 24 April 1906, page 6.


Wedding of Miss Mabel Reed.

The wedding of Miss Mabel Reed and Harry Lane of Los Angeles, which was set for tomorrow evening, at 8:30 o'clock at Trinity Church, corner of Twenty-ninth street and Telegraph avenue, will take place tomorrow at noon in the church.

Miss Reed has abandoned all her plans for an elaborate wedding and the ceremony will be a simple affair to be followed by an informal reception at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Reed, on Telegraph avenue.

Miss Reed will wear a travelling gown and will be attended by her sister, Miss Elva Reed, as maid of honor, and Miss Josephine Sarsfield as bridesmaid.

Stuart Hawley will act as best man and the ushers will be Lyle Brown and Clarence Reed.

The officiating clergyman will be Rev. Clifton Macon.

The young couple will leave tomorrow on the Owl for Los Angeles.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 24 April 1906, page 16.


Eagles Conduct Calamity Wedding.

Riley Moore, aged thirty-three years, and Mrs. Nannie Moore, a widow, both colored, were married in the presence of a large concourse of Eagles at that fraternity's headquarters in Oakland Police Court No. 1, Judge Mortimer Smith, who is president of Aerie No. 7, officiating. Coroner H. B. Mehrmann, who is also past president of Aerie No. 7, acted as best man, while Miss Lou Courdts, stenographer for the Aerie, was drafted in as bridesmaid, to make the complement complete.

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 24 April 1906, page 7.


Brings Bride From Earthquake.

A hasty wedding took place in Berkeley yesterday that lifted the gloom of the San Francisco calamity from a number of hearts. It was that of Robert F. Benham, of Portland, and Mary Louise Hale, of San Francisco. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. E. K. Jenness, of the Trinity Methodist Church. Mr. Benham is engaged with his father in engineering and irrigation contract work in the north and arrived in San Francisco last week and was here on Wednesday, the day of the terrible earthquake. In the confusion and terror of the double calamity, the Hale family was separated and only after a long search did Mr. Benham find his prospective bride.

The apartments were decorated with flowers, a minister was secured, and the couple were made man and wife, the bride wearing the only dress she had saved from the fire. A lunch took the place of the wedding supper and crackers were served for wedding cake. Last evening Mr. and Mrs. Benham left on the train for Portland. . .

Source: Portland Oregonian, 24 April 1906, page 1.


Earthquake Hastens Pretty Girl's Wedding.

Walter Arnstein and Miss Alice Sussman were married yesterday by Superior Judge Lawlor at his residence, 2120 Jackson street.

At the time of the earthquake Miss Sussman had been in a hospital for three days in preparation for an operation for appendicitis. After the disaster came, however, the operation was deferred, and Arnstein, who was about to leave for New York, induced Miss Sussman to wed at once and make the trip to the metropolis their honeymoon. A marriage license was immediately secured in Alameda county and the ceremony was performed by Judge Lawlor.

Mr. Arnstein is the son of the New York banker. His bride is a daughter of Mr. Sussman of the San Francisco firm of Sussman & Wormser.

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 25 April 1906, page 3.

Also appeared as: Quake Hurried This Wedding, Oakland Tribune, 25 April 1906, page 7.


Reunited By Earthquake.

Terrors Bring Divorced Couple Together, and They End Quarrel.

SAN FRANCISCO, April 25.—The earthquake here separated many couples, but it reunited at least one. Mrs. Lela Frank, of this city obtained from Judge Kerrigan on March 24 an interlocutory decree of divorce from Irving Frank. The terrors of the earthquake brought the pair together and this morning they sought out Judge Kerrigan and asked him to set aside the decree. A stroke of the pen made the old bonds as good as new, and the couple, after kissing in the presence of the law as an evidence of restored confidence, locked arms and went away smiling.

Source: Oregonian (Portland), 26 April 1906, page 3.


Miss McKenna Changes Plans for Her Wedding.

WASHINGTON, April 26.—Associate Justice McKenna of the Supreme Court of the United States, and Mrs. McKenna, have on account of the disaster in San Francisco and the lack of tidings from Mrs. McKenna's father and Justice McKenna's brother, both of whom live in San Francisco, recalled the wedding invitations of their daughter, Maire, who was to have been married to Davenport Brown of Boston to-day. The wedding will take place in the presence of only the relatives of the bridge and groom.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 26 April 1906, page 6.


Marriage Was Postponed.

For A Week By The Earthquake And Fire.

F. L. Updike of Reno and Mrs. M. Mellarkey of San Francisco Happily United.

The marriage of a Reno railroad man to a San Francisco woman, which was to have taken place on the day of the earthquake that brought death and ruin to many Bay City people, occurred Tuesday at Woodland, Cal., when F. L. Updike was united to Mrs. M. Mellarkey. Separated by the disaster, they were obliged to postpone the ceremony which was solemnized a week later in an adjacent city.

Mr. Updike is well known to the people of Reno, where he has always lived. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Updike and has been employed as conductor on the Southern Pacific for a number of years, being a member of the grievance committee.

The bride is a pretty young woman of San Francisco and has friends in Reno.

The two will come to Reno in a short time, where they will probably make their home.

Source: Reno Evening Gazette, 26 April 1906, page 3.


Demand For Marriage Licenses Continues.

The following marriage licenses were issued yesterday and today by the County Clerk's office. Many of the principals are refugees from San Francisco:

[see Marriages Database]

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 27 April 1906, page 6.


Quiet Wedding.

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Hogan announce the marriage of their daughter May to John Richard Cook Tuesday, April 24.

The marriage is announced of Miss Florence Irene Stevens and George Rostum Gilmour, which took place Wednesday evening, April 25th, at the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. F.L. Stevens, at 1118 Brush street.

The marriage was a quiet affair, witnessed only by relatives.

The ceremony was performed by Dr. Potter and the bride was attended by Miss Hazel Bush. Chester Stevens acted as best man.

The young couple will make their home in this city.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 27 April 1906, page 17.


Another Couple Wanted to Marry.

Alfonso Reguera, aged 29 years, with a peculiar light shining in his eyes, accompanied by a woman of about the same age, Miss Jesus Montano, called at the City Hall today inquiring for a marriage license. "We want to get married," said he. "We were going to be married last week, but the fire burned down the church where we were to have been married, and about $200 worth of my goods which I had stored in a warehouse were burned, so we had to wait a while." They were directed to the County Clerk's office, and started away with an elastic step, giving another evidence of the fact Cupid is a persevering little fellow.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 27 April 1906, page 7.


Sentiment Amid Ruins. Marriages Resulting from Common Woe.

By Harry C. Carr.
[By Direct Wire to the Times.]

SAN FRANCISCO, April 25.—[Exclusive Dispatch.] Fear lies chilly at my heart. Some female person will be sure to write a novel about this disaster. Romances are springing up on all sides.

In San Francisco today I saw one sprouting. An ensign in charge of a naval distributing station near Union Square had forgotten all about the earthquake and the long bread line. The pretty nurse had his reefer jacket on, and they were looking goo-goo eyes.

Last night, a woebegone man, with a bandaged head, came to the Oakland Chamber of Commerce. With him was one of the plainest women the good Lord in His mercy ever permitted to live. The man said he had just $1.25 in the world, and they decided to be married. He had the woman under his protection, and he had figured it out, 'twould be cheaper if they both lived in the same room. Some one went on the dead run for a person, and 'twas done.

A number of betrothed couples have been married since the quake, and have set up housekeeping in shacks made of sacks and dry goods boxes. The pluck of the San Francisco women is a glory to California. On O'Farrell street today, I saw girls heating flat irons on little brick ovens built in the street, and pressing shirt waists on their front porches. . .

MORE GUARDSMEN.

Another battalion of the Seventh Regiment, consisting of companies from Riverside, San Diego, San Bernardino and Redlands, arrived this morning. They went into camp in one of the city parks. . .

Source: Los Angeles Times, 27 April 1906, page 17.


Pretty Actress Becomes Bride.

A wedding of interest both on account of the parties concerned and the fact that it was hastened several months by the earthquake took place in Oakland last evening, when Miss Marie Gordon, one of the young and pretty stage favorites at Ye Liberty Playhouse, in Oakland, and the Majestic, in San Francisco, became the bride of Harry Beckwith, a prominent businessman of Portland, Ore. The ceremony was performed at the residence of former Postmaster J.J. White at the corner of West and Fifteenth streets, the Rev. Edgar F. Gee, officiating. Miss Lorette White acted as bridesmaid and William White as best man. A wedding supper followed the marriage service. The young couple today left for Portland, where they will make their home.

Miss Gordon is the sister of Eleanor Gordon, who created the part of Queen Vashti at the initial production of Ella Wheeler, Wilcox's drama of "Mizpah." She recently made a hit as the little country girl in "Who Goes There?" at Ye Liberty. The wedding was to have taken place in June, but the importunities of Mr. Beckwith finally prevailed upon Miss Gordon late yesterday afternoon to be married last night. In spite of the little time given for preparation the wedding was a very pretty affair.

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 27 April 1906, page 1.


Quake Hurries Wedding Bells.

San Francisco Twain Marry in San Bernardino.

SAN BERNARDINO, April 26.—The San Francisco disaster has led to one marriage here. Dr. Harold Brunn and Elsie Fecheimer, both residents of San Francisco, and both 24 years old, arrived from the distressed city today, and secured a license, and were married at the home of the groom's parents, who are wealthy residents of this place.

Dr. and Mrs. Brunn will settle in Los Angeles, where Mr. Brunn will have charge of the practice and office of Dr. De Barth Shorb, in the H. W. Hellman building, as Dr. Shorb leaves for Europe May 1.

Source: Los Angeles Times, 27 April 1906, page II 14.


Refugees Will Marry Here.

James C. Blythe and Miss Emma H. Gerner, Driven Out of San Francisco, Get License to Wed.

Two San Francisco refugees, James Cummings Blythe and Miss Emma H. Gerner secured a marriage license yesterday in Chicago. Mr. Blythe explained to the clerk that they were to have been married in July, but that the earthquake had changed their plans.

"I had a good business and a comfortable home in San Francisco before the earthquake," said he. "We had planned to get married in July after I had completed a business deal, but the earthquake drove us out of the city and we came direct to Chicago. Miss Gerner also was made homeless by the quake and the fire, so we decided to get married immediately."

"The stories of the disaster printed in the papers do not begin to picture the awfulness of the earthquake. We could not send messages to our friends in Chicago nor receive word from them."

Source: Chicago Daily Tribune, 27 April 1906, page 2.


Wedding Is Announced.

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Hogan announced the marriage of their daughter May, to John Richard Cook, on April 24, 1906.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 28 April 1906, page 12.


Married.

Dr. George W. Burgess and Miss F. Alberta Littlefield were quietly married this week at the bride's home on Sycamore street, Rev. Charles R. Brown officiating. Miss Littlefield had planned for an early June wedding, the details of which were to be most charming, but was pursauded to name a nearer day for her nuptials with Dr. Burgess.

Leo Gelder and Miss Gertrude Davis of San Francisco will be quietly married on Sunday afternoon in this city. The wedding was to have occurred in San Francisco, and the plans were progressing merrily when the disaster fell upon San Francisco. It was decided to waive all festival arrangements and to celebrate the nuptials quietly at an early afternoon wedding. Mr. Gelder is a member of the firm of John Gelder & Son.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 28 April 1906, page 2.


Calamity No Bar to Wedding.

BERKELEY, April 28.—Earthquake and fire did not stop the matrimonial intentions of Jue Sing and Ng Que Ling. Fleeing from the burning city on the day set for their marriage they fled to Berkeley and were made man and wife by Justice of the Peace Elgar.

The groom was a rich San Francisco merchant, but the flames devoured his stock of worldly goods. Still, he had Ng Que Ling and with her he left the fiery city to seek peace and quiet in her companionship. After the ceremony the couple left for a honeymoon trip to New York.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 28 April 1906, page 9.


San Francisco Orders Wedding Rings.

What was probably the first order for jewelry received in this city from San Francisco since the disaster was contained in a telegram received yesterday afternoon by a Maiden Lane firm. The order, which came from a retail jeweler, asked that 160 wedding rings of various sizes be sent in a hurry. It is supposed that the demand comes from couples whose marriages are being hastened because of the catastrophe.

Source: New York Times, 28 April 1906, page 1.


Determined to Wed Anyway.

Louis V. Gelder of 1511 Fair View street, Lorin, son of the well known plumber and politician, John Gelder, who is in business with his father at Thirtieth street and San Pablo avenue, and Miss Gertrude Davis, of 965 Oak street, San Francisco, whose home just escaped the recent fire by two blocks, were to have been married in the Bay State Cafe, Stockton street, San Francisco, on the 29th of the this month. The date of the ceremony has remained unchanged, but it will take place at 881 Twenty-sixth street, Oakland, their future home.

Only the near relatives of the parties have been invited. Mr. Gelder is a prosperous young business man.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 29 April 1906, page 12.


W. R. Fontaine Takes A Bride.

W. R. Fontaine, a young civil engineer in the employ of the Southern Pacific Company and Miss Alice L. Lowe, of Nevada, were married this morning at the home of the groom's father in this city.

The young couple will spend a brief honeymoon in the Sierras.

Their future home will be in San Frncisco.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 29 April 1906, page 4.


Judge Busy With Marriages.

Judge Carroll Cook is proving a friend to the young couples who want to be joined in the holy bonds of matrimony. Judge Cook will be at his home, 2601 Broadway, corner Scott street, each afternoon between 2 and 5 o'clock to perform wedding ceremonies.

Source. San Francisco Call, 29 April 1906, page 9.


June Wedding Was Hastened By Quake.

Nuptials of Otto J. Kruell and Miss Lizzie R. Hull Solemnized.

Quiet Ceremony Yesterday Afternoon Witnessed Only by Friends.

A quiet marriage took place yesterday afternoon at the parsonage of the Second Presbyterian Church, Rev. Dr. Mills officiating. The bride, Miss Lizzie Ray Hull, is the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Hull, No. 3 Hull avenue, this city, and has many friends here and in the East where she has spent several years with relatives. The groom, Otto James Kruell, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gustave Kruell, of East Orange, N. J., has lately come from the East, and now holds a responsible position with Messrs. Shreve & Co., of San Francisco. The parents of the bride and groom are well and favorably known. Mr. and Mrs. Hull are old residents of the Willows, and Mr. and Mrs. Kruell are well known in the East. Gustave Kruell is an artist of international reputation.

The wedding was originally arranged to take place in June, but owing to the calamity which has overtaken California, and in which Mr. and Mrs. Hull's home was wrecked, a quiet wedding was decided upon. This notice will serve to acquaint the many friends of the contracting parties, and their relatives of the change of the date and the reason for the same.

Source: San Jose Mercury Herald, 29 April 1906, page 15.


Weddings.

Hertz-Von Alstine.

Arthur H. Hertz, of San Francisco, and May E. Van Alstine, of Portland, were united in marriage in Oakland, Cal., April 20, Rev. Mowhay, of the First Congregational Church, officiating.

Source: Oregonian (Portland), 29 April 1906, page 27.


Marriage License Business Shatters All Records.

The busiest day in the history of the marriage license bureau of the Alameda County Clerk's office was last Saturday. From early morning to 10 o'clock at night County Clerk John P. Cook and his deputies were continually employed making out the licenses and the accompanying affidavits. Altogether there were thirty-eight couples given the prerequisite papers for the performance of the marriage ceremony.

The licenses issued last Saturday and this morning are as follows:

[see Marriages Database]

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 30 April 1906, page 2.


Cook Wedding Feast in Street.

Disaster Gives Zest to a Breakfast That Follows Marriage.

Following the solemnization of the wedding vows of Theodore Connolly and Miss Willa Thirsted yesterday afternoon, a wedding breakfast was served to the guests at the residence of the elder brother of the groom at Central avenue and Page street, and that wedding breakfast spoke well for the spirit that is typical of the new San Francisco.

Weeks ago the ceremony was planned and set for yesterday. The groom, in association with his four elder brothers, was engaged in a prosperous grocery business on Fourth street. The store went up in flames. A fine trousseau had been prepared for the bride. That, too, went up in flames, not a stitch of the finery being saved. But there was no postponement of the wedding and even the breakfast contemplated by the original arrangement was not dispensed with.

Ever since Tuesday of last week the families of the contracting parties had been on the hunt for delicacies of the sort that properly constitute a wedding repast and when one of the brothers of the groom on Saturday happened on a stock of champagne sufficient for the repast joy was unbounded. Immediately after the wedding the breakfast was served, and soon after the last words of felicitation had been pronounced the groom and his brothers were hustling about to get into contact with contractors and builders while the bride was busily engaged on the preparation of the evening meal, being by no means too proud to woo the cook stove that stood in the gutter in front of the one home left to the family. There can't be much the matter with San Francisco when that spirit prevails.

Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 30 April 1906, page 1.


Marriage List Still Grows.

The victims of Cupid's darts continue to beseige the Alameda County Clerk's office for marriage licenses. The following licenses were issued this morning and yesterday afternoon:

[see Marriages Database]

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 01 May 1906, page 6.


Many Eager to Marry.

The busiest day in the history of the marriage license bureau of the Alameda County Clerk's office was last Saturday. From early morning to 10 o'clock at night County Clerk John P. Cook and his deputies were continually employed making out the licenses and the accompanying affadavits. Altogether there were thirty-eight couples given the prerequisite papers for the performance of the marriage ceremony.

The licenses issued last Saturday and this morning are as follows:

[see Marriages Database]

Source: Oakland Tribune, 01 May 1906, page 5.


Marriage License Office Busy Despite The Fire.

Many Couples Apply For Permit To Join The Ranks Of The Benedicts.

Oakland, April 30.

The County Clerk has been issuing marriage licenses seemingly for both San Francisco and Alameda counties and for the ten days ending Saturday night 180 were issued, an average of eighteen daily. The normal issuance of licenses is about 120 a month. Those issued today were:

[see Marriages Database]

Source: San Francisco Call, 01 May 1906, page 15.


Wed In Berkeley; Off For Denver.

Berkeley, May 1.

The marriage of Harry E. Wright and Florence Garret took place at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Simon Cohen, 2444 Carlston street, last Friday. The ceremony was performed by Dr. W.P. Bush of this city. The young couple plan to spend their honeymoon in Denver, Colo.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 01 May 1906, page 5.


Dr. Hemphill Takes A Wife.

Cupid Still Busy, Defying All Disasters.

The Prominent Divine Is Quietly Married.

Even in these days of doubt and disaster Rev. John Hemphill of Calvary Presbyterian Church found time to realize that it was not good for man to live alone. He led to the altar yesterday afternoon Mary B. Taylor, a faithful worker of his flock, and the pair will labor for the spiritual welfare of New San Francisco together.

The ceremony, which was performed in Dr. Hemphill's own church, was private, only a few personal friends of the couple being present. The honeymoon will be spent in the doctor's residence, 2502 Fillmore street, until more auspicious times.

The following marriage licenses were granted late yesterday:

[see Marriages Database]

Source: San Francisco Call, 01 May 1906, page 4.


Berkeley Couple Take Hymen's Vows.

BERKELEY, May 1.—A[t] the home of the groom's parents, Miss Gertrude Davis of San Francisco was united in marriage to Leo D. Van Gelder of Berkeley. The wedding took place at 1511 Fairview street. Rev. Friedlander of San Francisco officiated.

The bride was attended by the sisters of the groom, the Misses Carrie and France Van Gelder. They were daintily attired in gowns of white point de sprit and carried long stemmed pink beauty roses. Following the ceremony the bridal party gathered at the wedding supper. In the midst of the supper the bride and groom slipped away, but not before they were well showered with the customary rice.

Mrs. Van Gelder is the daughter of Mrs. Rose Davis, formerly of San Francisco, and the groom is the son of John Van Gelder, who is prominent in fraternal circles in this city.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 01 May 1906, page 4.


Fire and Quake Hinder Not Love.

Californians, who are used to earthquake shocks and who now seem to be innured to fires, do not let such little things hinder the course of true love. At least two of them didn't. These two were George W. Emerson, chief accountant of the Union Gas Company, and Miss Josephine Hofmann, who were married after the bride's home had been dynamited and while the fire was eating even in the direction of the parson's home on Thursday, the second day of the great conflagration.

Behind drawn curtains to hide the light of two flickering candles from the vigilant guards Emerson and his bride were made one by Rev. George C. Adams of the First Congregational Church at the minister's home, No. 2710 Devisadero street, on Thursday night, April 19. In the morning the last breakfast in the home of the bride, which was at No. 1247 Bush street, was eaten and then the orders to vacate came. With all the household goods that could be crowded into a cart carefully packed, the girl who was to become a wife moved to a safe distance and saw her home blown up by the dynamiters. Followed the wedding ceremony.

Next morning when the bride and groom started to the ferry building on the first and longest stage of their wedding tour to Mill Valley they were rudely stopped by a young man in the uniform of a Lieutenant of the regular army. "You take your turn at the bricks," said he with unsympathizing emphasis as the groom, dragging a trunk and further encumbered by a suitcase, hove in sight.

"But I have just been married and am on my honeymoon," expostulated the unhappy groom.

"All the better. Learn now what you have to expect in married life," answered the Lieutenant. And George, the bridegroom, took off his coat and went after the bricks for five long hours while his tearful wife sat on the trunk and watched him work.

Hardly had the honeymoon pair moved three blocks after George's emancipation when he was again impressed, and spent two more hours in close intimacy with the brickpile. Finally, with temper ruffled, and the sweat of honest though enforced labor on his brow, the bridegroom escaped. The honeymoon so unauspiciously inaugurated is now being enjoyed under less strenous conditions at Mill Valley.

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 01 May 1906, page 6.


Cabaniss Marries Seven Couple.

Police Judge Cabaniss claims that he bears the record for marrying couples since the fire. He has married seven couples, one of the couples having been divorced for several years.

Source: San Francisco Call, 01 May 1906, page 8.


They Married In Haste After The Earthquake.

Daughter of Major in U.S.A. Weds the Rev. Cecil Marrack.

Earthquake Has Shaken a Few Apart But Shakes Many Together, Says Bishop.

"The earthquake, has shaken many people apart, but, thank God, it has shaken a few together." So spoke Bishop William Ford Nichols to a wedding party that gathered last Tuesday in the Episcopal residence, San Francisco, to witness the marriage of Miss Frances Febiger and the Rev. Cecil Marrack, who are now spending their honeymoon in this city, being registered at the St. James Hotel.

When the earthquake spread disaster through San Francisco Miss Febinger, who is a daughter of Major Lea Febiger, U.S.A., determined to leave the city for Vancouver, where her father was. Hasty preparations were made, and all was in readiness when the Rev. Cecil Marrack appeared upon the scene. He was engaged to Miss Febiger, but no definite date had been fixed for their wedding. Fearing that his bride might meet with mishap if they became separated, he pleaded that the ceremony be performed immediately.

Major Febiger arrived from the north Tuesday in time to lead the bride to the altar. He was still in his campaign uniform. There was no display made by the couple.

The clergyman and his prospective bride drove through San Francisco after arriving from Fort Baker, searching for the Marriage License Bureau. When the license was procured, the next difficulty was to find a ring. Fillmore street was traversed from end to end. A dozen jewelry shops were entered before the ring was found that would fit.

The ceremony was performed at the residence of Bishop Nichols. When it was completed the bridal party departed to Fort Baker, and enjoyed a brief honeymoon lasting for one day. They then returned and took up the relief work in St. Stephen's Episcopal Church on Fulton street, near Fillmore, and finally they came to this city [San Jose], where they will remain for a week or more. Marrack is a graduate of Stanford and has written for various magazines.

Source: San Jose Mercury Herald, 01 May 1906, page 5.


Offers to Wed Homeless Girl.

OAKLAND, April 30.--Hearing that there are Twenty-five young women burned out of their homes in San Francisco, who have started a marriage bureau on the Oakland water front with the hope of thus securing helpmeets and protectors, J. W. Bardwell of 1316 North Main Street, Los Angeles, has written a letter to Mayor Mott announcing that he is a candidate for matrimonial alliance.  He says: "I am earning a salary from $15 to $25 per week, and want someone to help keep it for me.  If you can do anything in this line for me, please do so and oblige."

There is no such marriage bureau and the Mayor's correspondent is doomed to disappointment in his romantic quest.

Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 01 May 1906, page 20.


Says Fellow Refugee Has Taken Wife.

The alleged elopement by one San Francisco refugee with the wife of another refugee was the cause of an altercation at Broadway and Tenth street yesterday in which a revolver figured and which resulted in the arrest of both individuals. George T. Montgomery who has been residing temporarily at 542 Twenty-second street in this city accused Edward Hunter of having stolen his better half the night before. Hunter denied the charge and Montgomery commenced to express his disapproval with the butt end of a pistol. Hunter had his assailant arrested on a charge of assault with a deadly weapon, and Montgomery had Hunter taken into custody on a charge of adultery. Montgomery was a hotel keeper before the fire and Hunter a clerk.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 02 May 1906, page 5.


Love Smites Fleeing Pair.

SEATTLE, May 2.—San Francisco's awful earthquake and fire made refugees of Hal Smith and Miss Sadie Stearling, but in doing so brought them together in love and marriage. Having lost all their personal possessions, and fleeing with thousands of others from their respective homes in the stricken city, they met for the first time on the train speeding northward to Seattle.

It appears to have been a case on either side of love at first sight. Before the end of their journey they had become engaged, and yesterday were married by Judge Morris in his department of the Superior Court. Mr. and Mrs. Smith left the court house accompanied by the congratulations of the few who witnessed a romance unique and rarely encountered in the ordinary walks of life. They expect in time to return to San Francisco.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 02 May 1906, page 14.


Married.

Walter R. Rontaine and Miss Alice Lowe were married at the home of the groom's father, W.F. Fontaine, 547 Twenty-seventh street Sunday morning and left at once for a visit to the bride's home in Nevada. They will return in a few days and make this city their home.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 02 May 1906, page 17.


Takes A Bride.

Alameda, May 2.

The stirring events of the past few weeks have prevented the formal notice of the marriage of Captain J. Jensen, of 2255 Pacific avenue, to Miss Emma Bendixon. The event took place Wednesday of last week at the residence of the groom and was performed by Rev. F.S. Brush. The bride was the widow of the well known shipbuilder, and has traveled for some time. Captain Jensen has resided in Alameda for more than a quarter of a century and is one of the most prominent shipping men about the bay of San Francisco. He will be congratulated by very many friends. If he has not been so congratulated already, it is because the formal announcement has been overlooked in the rush of other unusual things.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 02 May 1906, page 5.


Oakland Girl Weds.

A very pretty home wedding was solemnized at the home of David B. Traill, 2146 South Thirty-third street Tuesday evening, in which Miss Violet Waggoner of Oakland, Cal., and Arthur Traill were united in marriage by the Rev. Mills of the Hillside Congregation Church. The house was trimmmed in carnations, greens and roses. The bride was unattended and was gowned in a white silk gown, made princess. She carried a shower of bride's roses. The wedding was private, only relatives and intimate friends being present. Mr. and Mrs. Traill will be at home after May 1 at 2146 South Thirty-third street. Omaha Bee.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 02 May, page 6.


Pretty Wedding at Berkeley Home.

Berkeley, May 3.

Miss Lola Timber was married to Ottoa Kottenbach at the home of the groom's parents Tuesday noon at 1941 Kittridge street. Rev. Mr. Hodgkins performed the ceremony.

The home was gowned in a dainty creation of India linen, with trimmings of Mexican lace. Her maid of honor, Miss Marie Judd, wore a pretty costume of pink and white, carrying out the effect of the decorations. The groom was attended by his brother, Oscar Kottenbach.

Mr. and Mrs. Kottenbach will made a tour of California, after which they will go east to Lewiston, where they will reside.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 03 May 1906, page 13.


Advance Date of Wedding.

A very interesting, quiet, family wedding occurred on May 1st at "The Home," 662 East Twelfth street, in this city. The contracting parties were Joseph Pearse and Mrs. Lizzie T. Hunt. The officiating clergyman was Rev. George Morris.

The spacious parlor was artistically decorated with pink and white carnations, orange blossoms and ferns. After the ceremony, the happy bride and groom departed, amid a shower of rice, on a brief wedding tour.

The event partook of the character of a suprise, as members of the families were present now who could not be here at a later date which had been selected. One of these was a sister of the bride, Mrs. M.A. Thompson....[unreadable].

Source: Oakland Tribune, 03 May 1906, page 9.


Want Ad.

MATRIMONIAL.

A GENTLEMAN from the East would like to make the acquaintance of a refined young lady; object matrimony. Box 6406, Call office.

Source: San Francisco Call, 03 May 1906, page 6.


Popular Elk Claims a Bride.

William James O'Neill and Daisy Estella Franklin got their marriage license today. When they came into the office of the county clerk they deposited their grip just inside the outer-door, where it was supposedly out of sight of the clerks, and proceeded non-chalantly to business.

But the clerks at the marriage license desk know "Billy," so while "Cupid" Johnson engaged the two in conversation "someone" made a little addition to their luggage and arranged little celebration in advance when they should go out. The addition was in red ink on pure white paper, added to the suit case, and read:

"To be married soon." A burst of hand-clapping signalized their reception of it.

O'Neill is a popular Southern Pacific railroad conductor on the line to Sacramento, a member of the Elks, and chairman of the ball of the Order of Railway Conductors to be held at Reed Hall. His bride is a refugee from San Francisco, who has now a new home in Oakland.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 03 May 1906, page 16.


Romance of the Flames.

ALAMEDA, May 3.—Miss Esther Leinitz, a former Alameda High School girl, but who resided at the time of the great catastrophe at 2416 Union street, San Francisco, quietly slipped away on the 22d of April and was married to Daniel Reed in Oakland, Rev. J. G. Maar officiating.

The marriage was in the nature of an elopement, for while the couple had been engaged for some time, it was not known to their most intimate friends that their nuptials were to be happily consummated at so early a date.

When the great fire reached the vicinity of Miss Leinitz' home across the bay, Mr. Reed, hurried from his place of refuge in the southern part of the city to the rescue of the one whom he hoped some day to marry. Through the roar of flames he bore his affianced to a place of safety, at the ferry building.

Later the couple made their way to the home of friends, Dr. Myrtle E. Herrmann, 2024 Alameda avenue, in this city, arriving there early Saturday morning. On Sunday at an early hour the two refugees told their friends that they were to take a ride to Oakland. At 4 o'clock that afternoon they sent a telephone message to Dr. Herrmann that they were married, and congratulation followed. Mr. and Mrs. Reed are now residing in Oakland.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 03 May 1906, page 14.


Wed Despite Disaster.

Frederic J. Perry was married in San Francisco on April 28 by Rev. George W. White, pastor of the Central M. E. Church, to Mabel A. Hazlett of Palo Alto.

Source: San Francisco Call, 03 May 1906, page 8.


Offers To Wed Homeless Girl.

A Seattle man hopes to benefit by the San Francisco disaster to the extent of gaining a wife from among the women rendered homeless here. A post card addressed to the "Matromonial Bureau, near Ferry, on the water front, San Francisco," was left at the Harbor Emergency Hospital yesterday. It bore the following message:

"If you Have any Good Girl that is without a Home, and who has been working in a family, that desires to get Married, please Have them correspond with me, they must be between the ages of 18 and 22. I am 27. I would be glad to Help give a good Girl a home. They must have a No. 1 character. Hoping to hear further from you, remain yours resp.

"WILLIAM HOWARD.
"Gen. Del'y, Seattle, Wash.

"I will marry them as soon as they arrive if they are as I ask."

Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 03 May 1906, page 19.


Earthquake Hastens Nuptials.

Plans for Wedding in June Given Up and Couple Wed at Once.

Mrs. L. T. Hunt, landlady of The Home, 662 East Twelfth street, Oakland, in consequence of the earthquake was married on May 1st at 3 p.m. to Mr. Pearse from Nebraska. This was a complete surprise to the inmates of The Home and all her other friends and acquaintances.

Mrs. Hunt had planned to give her son, M. Claude Hunt, a birthday party on the evening of June 28th, when he completed his 21st year. On the program was to be a tableau in which Mr. Pearse and Mrs. Hunt were, with the assistance of a parson, to be joined in matrimony. Owing to the earthquake, M. Claude Hunt was called by business to go to Los Angeles and wrote to his mother that it would be impossible for him to be present at the party June 28th. He urged his mother, if she were to marry, to do so on May 1st, and she accepted his advice.

Boarders at The Home are patiently awaiting the return of Mr. and Mrs. Pearse from their honeymoon trip and it is possible that the surprise may be returned with interest.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 04 May 1906, page 9.


Marriage Service Performed Under Difficulties.

George W. Emerson and Miss Josephine Hoffman Wedded During Fire.

At the residence of Rev. George C. Adams, 2710 Devisadero street, Miss Josephine Hoffman, daughter of Joseph A. Hoffman, formerly of 1247 Bush street, was wedded to George W. Emerson, chief accountant of the Union Gas Engine Company, on the night of the day following the earthquake. It was the date set for the event, and on the night of the preceding Tuesday the Hoffman household made their final preparations for the occasion. Mr. Emerson hastened to the Hoffman house after the earthquake, and find that all were safe, hastened to Oakland to aid his sister who resided there.

On Thursday morning the firemen ordered those in the Hoffman house to leave and the house was dynamited. They moved their effects to the residence of the Rev. Dr. Adams, pastor of the First Congregational Church. The bride had saved her wedding presents and trousseau, and so it was decided that the wedding should taken place as though nothing had happened.

The bride was attended by Miss May Hoffman as bridesmaid and Miss Sarah Adams as ring-bearer. Harry Symonds accompanied Mr. Emerson as best man. Some twenty-five guests partook of a wedding cake saved during the exodus, while they drank imaginary toasts from an empty punch bowl, a mute reminder of the prevailing drought.

In the morning the bridal pair took their trunk to the Presidio wharf where they expected to catch a boat to Sausalito, Mr. Emerson was being assisted by his brother-in-law, James Mason, head of a New York publishing house. They were pressed in by the military as impromptu stevedores. For twenty-four hours they were expected to toil, but a kind-hearted officer who "had been there himself" released them from the rigors of martial law. At another wharf the bridegroom was compelled to hustle heavy freight, while the unhappy bride sat huddled on her trunk for five long hours. At 9 o'clock the couple reached their bungalow in Mill Valley.

As a sequel to this romantic episode of the fire Miss May Hoffman, the bridesmaid, became the wife of Will Adams, son of the Rev. George C. Adams. They were married at the residence of James Loring Barker in Berkeley on Sunday, April 29th, and will make their home in Seattle, where Mr. Adams' business interest lie.

Source: San Francisco Examiner, 04 May 1906, page 04.


A Wedding.

The marriage of Miss Veda Loggie and Earl Thomas Riley, which was to have been a June affair, took place quietly on Thursday, April 19, at the Episcopal Church in Santa Rosa.

The bride was formerly a Mills College Girl, and plans were made for an elaborate wedding in June.

Mr. and Mrs. Riley are spending their honeymoon at Skaggs Springs.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.


Wedding Cards.

Cards are out for the marriage of Miss Josephine Frierson and Ernest Stewart Ford, which is to take place Saturday, May 12, at the Frierson home on East Tenth street, East Oakland.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.


Downing-Truby.

A wedding which took place on the day originally set was that of Miss Bonnie Downing and Dr. Albert E. Truby, who were married on Thursday, April 26.

The ceremony was to have been performed at 4 o'clock on that afternoon at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. O.P. Downing on Green street, but took place instead at the San Leandro home of Socrates Huff, the bride's grandfather.

Dr. and Mrs. Truby were given a wedding supper by Dr. Stephenson in his quarters at the Presidio.

The young couple have dispensed with a honeymoon, and will remain at the post.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.


Quiet Wedding.

The marriage of Arthur E. MacDonald and Miss Marion Horton was solemnized on the evening of Wednesday, April 25, as had been planned. The wedding was a very quiet affair. There was no honeymoon trip and the young couple have settled in this city.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.


Wedding News.

The marriage of Miss Wanda Eggers and George Bromell was quietly celebrated last Monday, all plans having been dispensed with. The bride was a favorite on both sides of the bay and was much entertained since the announcement of her engagement several months ago.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 04 May 1906, page 10.



The following marriage licenses were issued from the county clerk's office during the week. Owing to the fact that the marriage license office in San Francisco has been closed since the earthquake Mr. Schaberg has been doing a rushing business:

[see Marriages Database]

Source: San Mateo Times-Gazette, 05 May 1906.


Marriage Licenses.

The unusual feature in the life of the marriage license clerk in the office of the County Clerk today, was the application of George Neumann and his bride-to-be, a pretty little Jewish maiden of 18, only five months in this country from Russia, who signed her name in Hebrew letters, Julia Zingen.

Other licenses were to

[see Marriages Database]

Source: Oakland Tribune, 05 May 1906, page 22.


Knight Dunlap Takes A Bride.

Dr. Knight Dunlap and Miss Mary Durand were quietly married on Thursday evening at the First Congregational Church, Rev. Chas. R. Brown officiating.

Dr. Dunlap is an instructor in psychology in the University of California. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H.A. Durand of La Canada. She is a member of the graduating class and has been prominent in the Delta Delta Delta Sorority.

Dr. and Mrs. Dunlap will make their home in Berkeley.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 05 May 1906, page 5.


Otto Tum Suden to Marry.

Attorney Otto Tum Suden is to be the groom of a delayed wedding which was scheduled to take place on the day of the big earthquake. His bride lost her trousseau and they have now concluded to go ahead with the wedding and yesterday he secured a license which reads Otto Tum Suden, 51, and Glen R. McDonald, 23, both of San Francisco.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 05 May 1906, page 9.


Earthquakes as Matrimonial Agents.

The number of marriages in San Francisco has been materially increased by the earthquake. People who have to be earthquaked into marriage ought not to be thrown in the divorce court by any less cataclysm.—Louisville Courier-Journal.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 05 May 1906, page 8.


Wedding Hurried By Earthquake.

The announcement has just been made of the sudden marriage of Miss Blanche Darby, formerly of San Francisco, and Charles R. Aley, a prominent railroad man of Salt Lake City.

The marriage took place at St. Paul's Church, in this city, the Rev. Mr. Allen officiating.

The wedding will prove a great surprise, no doubt, to Miss Darby's many friends, as it was so sudden.

Mr. Aley, as soon as he heard of the earthquake, left Salt Lake and came directly to this coast. When he returned some days ago, Miss Darby went with him as his bride.

The young couple are at present in Salt Lake City, where they expect to reside permanently.

Mrs. Aley is well known in musical circles on the coast, having been soloist for some time in St. Dominic's choir in San Francisco.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 06 May 1906, page 6.


Married on Day of Quake.

On the 18th of April, 1906, at the First Presbyterian Church at Polk street and Golden Gate avenue, by the Rev. H. Bell, D. D., Maude Lawson of Mellbourne, Australia, and James Hardy Ballance of North Carolina were married.

Source: San Francisco Call, 06 May 1906, page 11.


Bride Insists on Being Married in Golden Gate Park.

Miss Amilie Bartmann became the wife of Rudolph Bossert on Sunday at the bride's home in Golden Gate park. Since the fire, Miss Bartmann has been living as a refugee in the little summer house just west of the conservatory and when the day of her marriage was set she decided it should be from her own residence that Mr. Bossert should claim her. Accordingly Rev. F. D. Bovard of Berkeley performed the simple ceremony in the park home, which was tastefully decorated with flowers, M. L. Vansor acted as best man and Mrs J. Magure attended the bride. The wedding robe was of dark green, the gown in which the bride had made her hasty escape, but she carried the conventional shower of roses.

After a wedding trip to the Cliff House the young people will make their temporary home in the pretty little summerhouse where they were married.

Both the bride and groom lost their worldly goods in the San Francisco fire, but Mr. Bossert has his position with the firm of D. N. E. Waller & Company.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 07 May 1906, page 5.


More Applications for Refugee Wives.

Since some newspaper correspondent with a fertile imagination sent out the story that there were scores of young women rendered homeless by reason of the earthquake and subsequent fire were anxious to marry, Mayor Mott, and other officials have been receiving requests from various men who pick out wives for them. J. M. Meyers, a San Diego man has written that he wants a wife and would come and get one if he was assured he would be permitted to enter the City. Having been informed that he would not be able to pass the guard he has delegated Mayor Mott to pick out a wife for him. His instructions call for the selection of a respectable lady, dark complexion, able to do her own house work and willing to live on a farm.

George H. Harris, whose address is given as 54 Rush St., Chicago, also wants a wife and is willing to abide by Mayor Mott's selection, provided the woman it [sic] healthy, of good family and is willing to marry him on arrival at Chicago, he agreeing to furnish the necessary transportation.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 07 May 1906, page 2.


Miss Edna Cunard Becomes a Bride.

On Thursday evening of last week Miss Edna Cunard became the bride of J. W. Kirk at a pretty home wedding at the residence of Mrs. J. W. Aldrich, on East Seventeenth street, Rev. Dwight E. Potter officiating.

The rooms were beautifully decorated, a color scheme of pink and white being carried out in roses, orange blossoms, carnations and maidenhair fern. Miss Edna Parker was the bride's only attendant and was arrayed in a pretty gown of soft pink. She carried bridesmaid's roses. Dr. W. Davis of San Francisco supported the groom.

The bride was gowned in a soft white robe and carried a shower of bride's roses. Mrs. Cunard gave the daughter into the groom's keeping. After the ceremony, a fishnet of rose leaves was lowered, showering the the young people, who after a dainty wedding breakfast left for a honeymoon trip to the north.

The wedding guests included Rev. and Mrs. D. E. Potter, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Cunard, Mr. and Mrs. George Cunard, Miss Edna Parker, Dr. and Mrs. H. C. Miller, Dr. W. Davis, Mrs. Addie McKillican, Mr. Chester McKillican, Mrs. W. Cox, Miss Ethel Cox, Miss Ethel Miller, Miss Loyce Howland, Mr. Robert Parker, Miss Eva Williams, Miss Martha Smith, Mr. A. Faulkner, Mr. L. E. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Aldrich.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 07 May 1906, page 5.


Willing To Become Martyr In Cause of Matrimony.

William Henry Perkins, possessed of a strong right arm, worldly goods sufficient unto the needs of the day and a realization of the blessings thereof, has also an abnormal sense of duty.

William Henry Perkins will offer himself upon the matrimonial altar in the cause of any one of the various and many damsels in distress by reason of the recent disaster.

And yet there are croakers who sigh and say the age of chivalry is passed. It is not so. A knight as gallant as any who ever raised a spear for femininity in distress centuries ago, William Henry, who openly proclaims his castle at No. 1706 Tenth street open to any damsel who can make good in his few specified requirements. For her he will cheerfully dig down into his jeans to replace the finery destroyed by the flame and will establish a private bread line.

The major requirement is that she be good. A reasonable love of pleasure and an inclination toward affairs of gayety will be countenanced if she also hath an inclination toward things churchy and can keep a house and "make a cherry pie in a minute."

His gallant and magnanimous offer would extend further than in a single case, did the limiting laws of our state permit. His sense of duty is very keen.

When the cry of distress arose from the girls whose homes, situations, finery and entire where-with-all for existence was swept away by the fire, Perkins arose to the occasion nobly. The situation presented itself to him as a glowing opportunity for single men to score. He would marry one girl and remove her from the numerous delegations of refugees. That would help some.

A crisis like the present seemed to Perkins no time for idle sentiment. It was duty that kept jogging him in the ribs.

He took a day off from his work as switchman in the West Oakland yards, and visited a repository in San Francisco where the greatest supply of forlorn damsels are temporarily quartered. He asked to look over the stock on hand. The stock was low, however, scarcely a representative supply, those in charge thought, and Perkins could only explain his errand and leave an order.

Any aspiring to become the idol of the Perkins heart and the despair of the Perkins pocketbook are instructed to make application at the family home on Tenth street. She will be more favorable in the Perkins sight, perhaps, if she be rather small and blond. Not too small and not too blonde.

Widows, alfalfa or otherwise, are barred, absolutely.

In lieu of the presence of her possibly future lord and master, when she calls. Mother Perkins will give ear and will register applications. Mother Perkins is, by the way, about the best asset a man could possess in searching for a wife. She is ample and comfortable with that incomparable manner that suggests a capability to go all wrong. She confesses to the experiences of guiding the affairs of nine children. It surely is a comfortable motherly shoulder and a sympathetic ear that awaits some girl—any girl who can make good.

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 07 May 1906, page 05, photograph.


Oakland Man Would Keep Pretty Girls At Home.

Calls at Harbor Hospital in Search of the Supposed Matrimonial Bureau.

W.H. Perkins of 1706 Tenth street, Oakland, is willing to marry an unimcumbered refugee. He called at the Harbor Hospital yesterday for information about the twenty-five young women supposed to have banded themselves into an association for the purpose of securing husbands. He was hanging around the hospital for some time before he mustered the courage to enter. He was not sure he was at the right place until he caught sight of Miss Amy Hart, the matron on duty.

In about three seconds he had offered his hand, heart and home to the pretty nurse.

"Don't judge me by my clothes," he said. "I am a brakeman and did not have time to dress up. I saw in The Call where a man from Fresno and another from Seattle had put in applications and I said to myself, 'We need all our pretty girls at home,' and as soon as I could get away I hurried over. Are you the only one left?"

Miss Hart assured the brakeman that she was not a member of the matrimonial association and that she could not tell him where the advertised marriage bureau was located.

Unconvinced and with reluctance Perkins backed out of the door and shape a course, under a slow bell, for the Oakland ferry.

Source: San Francisco Call, 07 May 1906, page 8.


Weds Daughter of Major Horace Bell.

Berkeley, May 7.

Friends of Edgar A. Jones of San Francisco will be interested in the announcement of his wedding with Miss Maud Bell of Berkeley, which took place on Saturday afternoon at the First Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Jones in the youngest daughter of Major Horace Bell of North Berkeley and is well known on this side of the bay. Mr. Jones is a graduate of Stanford University with the class of 1903, and is a member of the Chi Psi and Delta Phi fraternities. He is associated with the Wickham Havens Realty Company of Oakland.

Miss Henriette Veiller was bridesmaid and Walter Trent, a fraternity brother of Mr. Jones from Stanford, was best man. The couple will spend their honeymoon at Del Monte.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 07 May 1906, page 8.


Quiet Wedding.

The marriage of Mrs. Elise Page and Edward Eugene Easton took place last Monday at St. Mark's Church, in Berkeley. After the wedding a breakfast was served at the home of Ernest Mendenhalls, where the bride has been a guest since the burning of her home in San Francisco.

Mr. and Mrs. Easton have gone to Los Angeles. Their summers are to be spent at the country home of the Eastons in Ohio and their winters will be enjoyed in Washington, D.C.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 07 May 1906, page 4.


Davis-Murison.

One of the recent weddings of interest was that of Miss Helen McGregor Murison and Harry Francis Davis, which took place Thursday, May 3d, at the residence of Rev. Dr. McClure, who officiated.

The wedding was a quiet affair, attended only by relatives. An elaborate summer wedding had been planned, but on account of the unsettled state of affairs an early and very simple ceremony was substituted.

Mr. and Mrs. Davis are spending their honeymoon at Bonnie Briar, the country home of the bride's aunt, Miss Elizabeth Murison.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 07 May 1906, page 4.


Pretty Girl Journeys From London to Oakland to Wed.

A pretty romance connected with the earthquake was told to Deputy County Clerk Zambreski this morning by a young couple, Chevilier M. Turner and Ellen J. Lucas, to whom he issued a marriage license. Mr. Turner, who is a prepossesing young man, 26 years of age, came to California from London, England, several years ago and settled at Ferndale, Humboldt county. He left his sweetheart in London, promising to send for her to come and wed him in California as soon as he prospered sufficiently to be able to support a wife.

A few weeks before the earthquake Mr. Turner dispatched a message to Miss Lucas, who is 25 years old and very pretty, to leave England and join him here. She joyfully hastened to comply with his request. Miss Lucas landed in New York April 18, and was dismayed at seeing the exaggerated accounts of the earthquake in the Eastern papers. Frantically she sent telegrams and letters to her lover in Humboldt county. But she waited in vain for replies. Just as she had come to the conclusion that Turner had perished in the earthquake and while she was making her heart-broken preparation to return to London, a telegram came from her fiance, telling her that he was safe and that she should come on to Oakland immediately and meet him.

Again life seemed bright and she took the first train for the west. Her lover met her as she stepped from the train in Oakland today and together they journeyed to the County Clerk's office for their license. They were wedded immediately and started at once for their future home in Ferndale.

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 07 May 1906, page 5.


Romance of The Great Earthquake.

A pretty romance was consummated Monday when a marriage license was issued by County Clerk Cook to Chevalier M. Turner of Ferndale, Humboldt county and Ellen J. Lucas of London. The groom is twenty-six years old and the bride is twenty-five.

Some years ago Turner left "dear old London" and came to California to make his fortune. He left his sweetheart behind him, telling her he would write her as soon as he was rich. Fortune has smiled on him, and he has built up a big property at Ferndale. A short time ago, he wrote to Miss Lucas, asking her to join him.

Miss Lucas arrived in New York on the morning of the earthquake. Great fear possessed her, the stories in New York stating that all California was in ruins. She telegraphed as soon as she could and then took the first train out with suspense in her heart. She found on landing that her lover was safe and as soon as they could, they secured their license.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 08 May 1906, page 6.



Pomona Wedding.

News of the wedding of Harold P. Springer and Miss Emily McDonald of San Francisco will be of interest to friends here. The marriage took place at the home of Mrs. C.E. Baker in Pomona. The wedding had been set for April 18 but the bride's family were refugees from the fire on that day.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 08 May 1906, page 3.


Home Wedding.

The marriage of Miss Edna Cunard and J.W. Kirk was one of the pretty events of the week, taking place Thursday evening at the residence of Mrs. J.W. Aldrich on East Seventeenth street. The officiating clergyman was the Rev. Dwight E. Potter. The bride wore a pretty gown of white and carried a shower of bride's roses. Miss Edna Parker was the bride's only attendant and was gowned in pink silk. She carried bridesmaid roses. Dr. W. Davis of San Francisco attended the groom. After the ceremony there was an informal reception and Mr. and Mrs. Kirk left for a honeymoon trip to the north.

The wedding guests included Rev. and Mrs. D.E. Potter, Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Cunard, Mr. and Mrs. Gorge Cunard, Miss Edna Parker, Dr. and Mrs. H.C. Miller, Dr. W. Davis, Mrs. Addie McKillican, Chester McKillican, Mrs. W. Cox, Miss Ethel Cox, Miss Ethel Miler, Miss [unreadable] Howland, Robert Parker, Miss [unreadable] Williams, Miss Martha Smith, A. Faulkner, L. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Aldrich.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 08 May 1906, page 5.


Pretty Wedding.

George C. Bannington and Miss Grace Amann were quietly married on Monday at the home of C.H. Gruenhagen in San Francisco. The officiating clergyman was Rev. Burr M. Weeden, rector of St. Luke's.

Flowers were scattered in the pathway of the bride by little Geraldine Gannon and Hattie Pomeroy, nieces of the groom. Mrs. George Johnson acted as matron of honor and George Kennedy attended the groom. The bride was given into the groom's keeping by her brother.

After the ceremony a wedding breakfast was served at the home of the groom's sister, Mrs. Walter Gannon, on Pierce street.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 08 May 1906, page 3.


An Engagement.

The engagement is announced of Miss Rosalia Borghi, of Petaluma, and J.A. Guidice, a wealthy young San Francisco business man who is connected with the Southern Pacific. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. Borghi.

The wedding will take place early this summer, and the young couple will make their home in San Francisco.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 08 May 1906, page 3.


Path of Roses For A Bride.

George C. Barrington and Miss Grace Amann were married yesterday afternoon at the home of C.H. Gruenhagen, No. 2727 Pierce street, by the Rev. Burr M. Weeden, rector of St. Luke's Episcopal Church.

An altar of white lilies was erected upon the lawn. A bank of heliotrophe formed the background while a pathway of roses led the way to the chancel. The matron of honor was Mrs. George Johnson, and the best man George Kennedy. The flower girls were Miss Geraldine Gannon and Miss Hally Powers, nieces of the groom.

A wedding breakfast was served at the home of Mrs. Walter Gannon, a sister of the groom. The bridal couple were driven away in a shower of rice. Their destination has been kept a secret, but within a few weeks they will return to make their home in San Francisco.

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 08 May 1906, page 2.


George Barrington Claims A Bride.

George C. Barrington claimed Miss Grace Amann as his bride on Monday evening of this week, the simple ceremony being solemnized at the home of C.H. Gruenhagen in San Francisco. Mrs. George Johnson attended the bride as matron of honor and Miss Geraldine Gannon and Miss Hattie Pomeroy, nieces of the groom, served as the little flower girls, strewing the bridal path with flowers. Miss Amann was given into the groom's keeping by her brother. George Kennedy acted as best man and Rev. Burr M. Weeden, rector of St. Luke's, read the marriage service.

After the ceremony the bridal party and guests were the guests of Mrs. Walter Gannon, sister of the groom, at an elaborate wedding supper.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 09 May 1906, page 7.


Each Blushing Bride Gets A Large Red Rose.

Happy Newark Couple Sends Flowers With Injunctions to County Clerk.

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Moses, among the oldest residents of Newark, to-day sent County Clerk Cook a large bouquet of roses, of which one rose was to be given to each prospective bride. Owing to the large boom in the marriage license business Mr. Cook is of the opinion that it will take a great many roses to go round. The sentiment of Mr. and Mrs. Moses is deeply appreciated and it is felt that each new bride will hold them in remembrance for a long time to come.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 09 May 1906, page 1.


Earthquake Shakes Them Together.

James P. Kirwan, thirty-eight years old, has been united again by the earthquake. Recently Mrs. Kirwan was granted an interlocutory decree of divorce. After the earthquake Kirwan fell ill and his former spouse nursed him. Tuesday they took out a license to try married life together again. Mrs. Kirwan stated today that theirs had had "only been a slight difference, after all."

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 09 May 1906, page 6.


Engagement, Which Was Denied, Culminates in Marriage.

The sequel of the engagement of Mrs. Louise Martin, widow of the late Shelby F. Martin of the Union Bank of Savings, and Hiram T. Bradley, a well known young man of this city, which was announced exclusively in the Enquirer a few weeks ago and at that time strenously denied by Mr. Bradley, occurred at Los Angeles on Friday last when the couple was wedded. Mr. and Mrs. Bradley are now enjoying an automobile trip in the southern part of the State.

Mrs. Bradley is the daughter of Colonel and Mrs. L. L. Bromwell of this city and her wedding to Shelby F. Martin, son of the late J. West Martin, president of the Union Bank of Savings was a notable society event. Mr. Martin passed away a year or more ago. Mr. Bradley is well known in this city, his home having been at 364 Fourteenth street, where he has been engaged in manufacture of gas engines and automobiles. The engagement of the couple was kept very quiet and, as stated, was denied at the time that the matter was given publicity in the Enqurier but, as has now been demonstrated, the facts were as announced in the Enquirer at the time.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 09 May 1906, page 2.


Cupid Ready For Business.

SAN FRANCISCO, May 9.—Persons desiring marriage licenses will find Cupid Danforth in charge of this department of the County Clerk's office at 404 Haight street. The office of the County Clerk is somewhat scattered, and while a part of it is near the Tabernacle on California street, the marriage license bureau is across the town from it.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 09 May 1906, page 1.


'Quake Reunites Divorced Couple.

One result of the earthquake in San Francisco has been the reuniting of James P. Kirwan and his wife, Mrs. Frances E. Kirwan, who were divorced several years ago. They met in a refugees' camp and forgot their differences in their common losses. Yesterday they came to Oakland and secured a license to marry. Mrs. Kirwan is 36 years old and her husband is two years her senior.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 09 May 1906, page 13.


Girls Coming From Camps.

Homeless Refugees Saved From Hardships.

Positions Here Awaiting Arrival of One Hundred Young Women Chosen by Mrs. Blanchard at San Francisco to Come to This City. One Job is to Get Married.

Word was received yesterday from Mrs. Lucy S. Blanchard, vice-president at-large of the Women's Parliament of Southern California, who is in San Francisco selecting the first 100 women and girls who will be brought to this city, that she had already entered upon her work and had established headquarters in the Chronicle building.

Mrs. Blanchard writes to Mrs. Jefferson D. Gibbs, president of that organization, who is in charge of the employment bureau for refugees in The Times building, that Mrs. Alice Keating, the noted authoress, has volunteered her help in selecting the women and girls who will be given positions in this city.

The greatest care is being taken in this matter and the various camps of relief in San Francico are being visited and the unfortunate women and girls closely examined. None but deserving ones will be brought to Los Angeles.

Yesterday was the busiest day of all in the employment bureau in The Times building. A total of fifty-two applicants were given comfortable positions and went their way rejoicing. Over 106 new positions were listed during the day.

The volume of business has become so great, that Mrs. Gibbs has been compelled to establish two new departments to care for it. The new departments are, mail department, which is presided over by Mrs. Phillip Gerhartz, and Miss Rhodes, and an investigation department, which is provided over by Mrs. William Thilenius.

The fame of Mrs. Gibbs's employment bureau and the prospects of bringing a number of girls and women from San Francisco to this city has caused many amusing incidents to occur.

Yesterday J. Logalbiel of the Soldier's Home at Sawtelle, wrote to Mrs. Gibbs a letter asking to be furnished a wife.

He argues from the standpoint that if refugees are seeking work and a home, he will give one of them both of these things. He says he can spare $8 a month to his wife, and probably next month, when he expects a raise in salary, he can give her $16.

He asks for a brunette, plump and not afraid to work. She must have a taste for nurse work and a woman of German extraction is preferred. Mr. Loganbiel says he is "a decent man, 175 pounds, 5 feet 11 inches in height, and a Christian, and have seen thirty-eight years' hard work."

Mrs. Gibbs is debating the burning question of acting as proxy for the gentlemen and proposing to one of her numerous applicants for work, or having the veteran come to the bureau and arrange matters himself.

Source: Los Angeles Times, 09 May 1906, page II 6.


San Francisco Girl Weds N.Y. Broker.

San Jose, May 11.

Miss Caroline Louise Haven, daughter of Charles D. Haven, a prominent resident of San Francisco, and Charles D. Stevens, a New York fruit broker, were married in Trinity Church yesterday, the Rev. J. Wilmer Gresham, officiating.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 20.


Knows Not the Name of His Lady Love.

Murty Sullivan has learned to think so much of "Mrs. Waler" that he wants her to marry him. He has even gone so far as to ask her to share the lot of an Oakland expressman for life. Yet he has never found sufficient courage to ask the buxom widow for her first name.

Murty appeared at the County Clerk's office to procure a marriage license and to register as a voter. He registered first. His name was Murty Sullivan; he said he was 50 years old and a native of Ireland; he was an expressman and lived at 644 Thirty-sixth street. Then he gave a description of himself and his visible marks and scars, forswore all allegiance to foreign powers and potentates and demanded a marriage license.

To Deputy Clerk Donahue, the acting cupid, Sullivan handed a slip of paper on which was inscribed, "Mrs. Waler, Ireland, 45 years old; residence, Oakland."

"What's the lady's name?" asked Donahue.
"It's on the paper," replied Sullivan.
"But her first name?" persisted the clerk.
"It's on the paper," repeated Sullivan. "That's all I know."
"What did you call her when you proposed?" asked Donahue, with Cupid's own patience.
"That's my business," replied Sullivan with rising anger, and a license was issued entitling Murty Sullivan and a Mrs. Waler to wed. It is now up to Murty to say which Mrs. Waler shall become the blushing bride, provided that more than one Mrs. Waler is willing.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 9.


Linguist to Marry College Girl.

Dr. Bade Wins the Heart of Miss Mary Ratcliff.

Among the little bits of social news that has begun to leak out, since the earthquake disaster, there is none that interests a wider circle of friends than the announcement of the engagement of Miss E. Mary Ratcliffe, of Berkeley, to Dr. William Frederic Bade, Professor of Semitic Language and Literature in Pacific Theological Seminary. Miss Ratcliffe not only is prominent in the society of the University town, but is an accomplished musician, and an enthusiastic outdoor woman. Being among those of the Sierra Club who made the ascent of Mt. Ranier last summer, she wrote an extremely interesting account of it for the Sierra Club Bulletin.

Dr. Bade, who is himself a daring mountaineer and officially connected with the Sierra Club, pursued special studies at leading German and French Universities last summer. One month was in the Alps where he made among other ascents that of the world-famed Matterhorn. He was to have given an illustrated lecture on this thrilling performance at the Academy of Sciences in San Francisco on the 27th of April. But the earthquake intervened, and incidentally prevented some showers of congratulations, which are, however, none the less certainly reaching the happy pair.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 11 May 1906, page 8.


Marriage.

The marriage of Miss Caroline Louise Haven and Charles Dexter Stevens was quietly solemnized yesterday morning in San Jose. The couple were married at Trinity Church, Rev. J. Wilmber Gresham officiating.

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Haven and was a popular society girl of this city before the family moved to San Francisco a few years ago.

The engagement, announced a few months ago, came as a great surprise to the friends of the couple, who had not suspected their secret. No date was mentioned at that time for the wedding which was quietly celebrated yesterday.

Mr. Stevens is from New York, with extensive business interests in San Francisco and in San Jose.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.


Wedding Date.

The marriage of Miss Mercedes Fabiano and W. Bernard Barbee will take place on June 6 at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. F.J. Fabiano on Thiry-sixth street.

The groom-elect is a young business man of San Francisco, being associated with the branch office of the Colonial Security and Trust Company of Chicago.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.


Berkeley Wedding.

The marriage of Miss Velma Butler and Herald Pracht took place recently in Berkeley, the Rev. Mr. Parsons officiating.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.


Quiet Wedding.

The marriage of Royal J.H. McNee of Berkeley and Miss Gertrude L. Stack of San Francisco will be one of the events of the week. The young couple have a host of friends about the bay who will be interested to learn of the approaching wedding.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.


Quiet Wedding.

The marriage of Charles W. Ayer and Miss Helen Kappenman was quietly solemnized last Wednesday in this city. The couple are both from San Francisco where the groom is well known in the business world. The wedding had been planned to take place across the bay but existing conditions caused the change of plan. Mr. and Mrs. Ayer will make their home in this city.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.


Wedding Bells Ring At Newark.

Newark, Mary 11.

Manuel P. Mendonca and Mrs. Carolinda Jonlin were married by the pastor of the Catholic Church in Hayward on Saturday, May 5. The happy couple are now living at the bride's home in Newark.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 11 May 1906, page 7.



Menlo Park Occurrences.

A.P. Redding and Miss Katherine J. Clarke were united in marriage at the home of the groom at Fair Oaks last Wednesday.  The bride was handsomely gowned.  There were a number of guests present including the children of Mr. Redding.  The couple left on the evening train for Del Monte where the honey moon will be spent.  Mr. and Mrs. Redding have the best wishes of all for a happy wedded life.  The wedding was planned to take place Wednesday, May 2, at the home of Miss Clarke's mother on Clay street in San Francisco, and to be followed by an eastern tour, but on account of the fire the change in plans was made.  Mr. and Mrs. Redding will be at home in Menlo Park during the summer months.

Source: San Mateo Times-Gazette. 12 May 1906.


Wedding of Miss Marion Goodfellow And Stanley Moore.

The marriage of Miss Marion Goodfellow and Stanley Moore was solemnized at a simple service this afternoon at the Church of the Advent, East Oakland, Rev. Jerome Trivett officiating.

Seventy guests, including only the families and closest friends gathered in the beautifully decorated church shortly before three o'clock, and on the hour the bridal party entered.

Miss Eleanor Davenport as the maid of honor was Miss Goodfellow's only attendant. She wore a simple gown of white with a chic picture hat and carried a shower of white roses. Miss Goodfellow in her bridal gown of white net and large hat made a stunning figure as she advanced to the alter on the arm of her father, where she was met by the groom and his best man, Arthur Goodfellow.

Following the ceremony at the church an informal reception was held at the Goodfellow home on Fifth avenue after which the bride and groom left for a delightul sojourn in Yosemite Valley.

The plans which Miss Goodfellow had made for an elaborate wedding were abandoned by reason of the sadness of the time and every detail of today's affair was a simple and beautiful as this popular girl could make it.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 12 May 1906, page 7.


Petaluma Young Lady Becomes Bride of Oaklander At Pretty Wedding.

There was a beautiful wedding at the home of Mrs. E. Button Brown of Berkeley last Saturday evening when her cousin, Miss Emma Haskill became the bride of Wallace Merwin. The home carried an artistic arrangement of flowers and ferns, pink and white making the effective color scheme. White roses formed the marriage bower and here the clergyman who had christened and confirmed the young bride said the solemn words which made her wife of the man of her choice. The bridal gown was a dainty one of white crepe de chine with elaborations of lace and her mother's wedding veil completed a charming costume. A double significance was in the wedding ring for it was the one with which her father many years before had given his pledge to his own bride and it was the daughter's wish that the small golden band should be used as a seal to her own marriage.

Forty guests partook of the delicious wedding supper. During the evening Louis T. Merwin, of Fresno, brother of the groom, sang the favorite wedding songs, "O Promise Me," and "Because I Love You."

Mr. and Mrs. Merwin are cosily settled in the pretty new home on Twenty-fifth street which has been prepared for the young bride.

Wallace Merwin is well known in musical circles about the bay, having received favorable comment on his splendid baritone voice. Mrs. Merwin is a Petaluma girl and has been popular among a large circle of friends.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 12 May 1906, page 7.


Will Be Wedded This Evening At Home Of Bride.

This evening Miss Josephine Frierson will become the bride of Ernest Ford at a quiet wedding at the bride's home on East Tenth street. Pink and white is the color scheme which the young bride has selected and will be carried out in roses and hawthorne relieved by the cool green of the fern. Sixty guests will witness the marriage service which will be read by Rev. James Curry of Vacaville. After a dainty wedding supper, Mr. Ford and his bride will leave for the east where for the next few years they plan to make their home, going first to Cincinnati and possibly later on to New York.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 12 May 1906, page 7.


Surprised Friends by Announcing Marriage.

Dr. Harold Brune has surprised his friends by announcing his marriage with Miss Flecheimer, a trained nurse who has been connected with Dr. Adler's sanitarium.

Dr. Brune has been the efficient assistant of Dr. MacMonagle in some of his most serious operations and a brilliant future in the medical field is predicted. Dr. Brune and his bride will make their home in Los Angeles, where he has taken the practice of Dr. Shorb, a brother of Mrs. Shorb-White of San Francisco.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 12 May 1906, page 6.


Earthquake as Cupid.

ALAMEDA, May 12.—The recent calamity led Miss Marie Beranek and Joseph Krieg, late of San Francisco, but since the great fire refugees at the Elks' camp, to decide that it was best for them to go along life's quaky path together.

Thursday afternoon they took a trip to Oakland and when they returned to camp at night they announced that they had been married by Justice of the Peace Geary in the latter's office in Oakland.

The groom is a carpenter and is twenty-four years of age. He was at work on the Monadnock building at the time of the fire. The conflagration which spared this building also spared Krieg's outfit of carpenter tools. Immediately after coming to the refuge camp Krieg sought work. He has been working each day since returning to the camp at night to sleep.

The groom and the bride were acquainted before the fire. They lived in the same building. The bride is eighteen years of age. Her mother was in Alameda to see her daughter and new son-in-law. Yesterday she left for Portland, Or.

When the news of the wedding, and the arrival of the bride and groom swept through the camp, it caused quite a stir. Arrangements for a reception were at once hurried along. The soldiers of Company D, headed by the camp bugler, marched down to the Elks' camp, and all the refugees, doctors and nurses in camp turned out to extend congratulations. There were speeches, songs and music on the bugle, and or most everything else available that would make a sound from being thumped or blown.

There was no bridal chamber available at the camp, but Regimental Quartermaster Smiley gave up his tent to the couple. Yesterday morning Krieg and his bride left for San Francisco, where the husband has secured work on a long job. For them the past is forgotten and the future holds no terrors.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 12 May 1906, page 24.


Earthquake and Fire, Marriage Promoters.

by Betty Martin

Queerly enough the earthquake and fire has served as a marriage promoter. Whether or not the disaster has awakened man's chivalry is something of a question, but it is an undisputed fact that men who before the fire considered themselves too poor to marry have jumped into the breach and carried off brides bringing with them or even the vestige of a trousseau.

Even in the relief camps the microbe of marriage has penetrated. It may be that the "gentle spring" has something to do with this state of affairs and also that propinquity lends its share. That the latter doesn't always cut ice is evidenced by a nice, very nice—judging from his letter—young man, who hails from Fair Oaks, Sacramento county, who has written to the ladies of the free employment bureau for a wife. He is quite definite, regarding physical requirements, and dwells at length on the color of her hair and eyes together, with what housewifely accomplishments she must be endowed with. Stamps are enclosed for a reply to this touching appeal for a helpmate, and one thing is sure, either the answer, must, be a long one, or there is to be a choice of applicants, for three bright two-cent stamps were enclosed. However, most young men prefer to do their courting first-hand, after the time-honored custom.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 12 May 1906, page 13.


Cupid Again At His Pranks.

Victims of Disaster Are Married at the Catholic Church in Haywards—Quiet Affair.

HAYWARDS, May 14.—Undaunted by the recent disaster at San Francisco, Cupid repeated his performances given so many times in the last few weeks, and brought together at the altar Miss Katie Calahan and Frank Randall. They were married by the Rev. Father Villadamott in the Catholic Church of this city, and a few friends and relatives were the only ones present.

The couple, since the fire, have been housed at the Stanton ranch at Castro valley. Miss Ollie Calahan, a sister of the bride, acted as bridesmaid, and J.T. Stanton was best man. The wedding trip was made to Oakland, where Mr. and Mrs. Randall are to make their home.

Source: San Francisco Bulletin, 14 May 1906, page 3.


Cupid's Costumes Purchased Here.

Young Women of Oakland Come to Sacramento For Wedding Finery.

They Declare the Dry Goods Houses of This City Carry a Better and More Expensive Stock to Select From Than Can Be Found in Any Other City on the Coast.

The recent catastrophe in San Francisco has developed the fact in the minds of the shopping public that Sacramento dry goods houses are carrying a more complete stock of goods, both in variety and value, than any other city on the Coast, and the result is that scores of young women, in selecting their wedding trousseau, are coming here to patronize the ideal houses.

This is particularly true regarding the shoppers of Oakland, and one of them, in explaining her reasons, said to the Oakland Herald: "I shall purchase my trousseau in Sacramento because I do not think I can get what I want in Oakland, and I know that I can get everything I want in Sacramento. You see that Oakland is so close to San Francisco that it could not compete with the big stores across the bay in the important and more expensive requirements of woman's dress, while Sacramento is compelled to keep in stock goods of the best quality, because the people for that section could not readily reach San Francisco when they desired to make such purchases. I am in consequence going to Sacramento. I believe that I can find there a greater variety from which to select what I require, and of a quality nearly as good as I could get in San Francisco before the fire."

Inquiry among the leading dry goods houses of this city develops the fact that this is absolutely true in every detail. One of the heads of a department store, when interviewed to-day said: "It is certainly a fact that the dry goods houses of this city carry a better stock of goods than any house in Oakland. There is one good house there that carries some expensive stock, but we can favorably compare with it in every department and outshine it in almost everything.

"Since the fire we are getting very extensive orders from Oakland, and even from San Francisco, and it is an every-day occurrence to have a call for a wedding trousseau that runs up into the hundreds of dollars."

The manager of another department store, when questioned on this subject said: "There is no doubt about it; the young women of Oakland are patronizing us very handsomely. To-day one of them accompanied by a woman friend came in and purchased a trousseau that cost over $500, and we had several like sales last week that run from $200 to $800.

"You see, we are obliged to carry a full stock of expensive goods, for the women of this city demand the best. The result is that we can furnish almost everything required. Our stocks are very heavy at the present time, as all of the goods that were on the way for our San Francisco houses before they were destroyed, are being unloaded here, and we have the handling of them."

Source: Sacramento Bee, 14 May 1906, page 5.


Oakland Girl Is Wedding Attendant.

At the residence of her parents in Santa Rosa, Miss Mollie Cambra and Reginald C. Brooks were united in holy wedlock by Rev. A. Burleson at high noon on Wednesday, May 9th.

The bride was given away by her father and attended by her sister, Mae Cambra of Oakland and Miss Charlotte Halford of Napa as maid of honor. The groom was attended by Austin Thomas of Napa as best man. Miss Buella Thurber played the wedding march. Only the immediate relatives of both parties were present. Napa Register.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 16 May 1906, page 7.


Hastens West and Wins Girl of His Choice.

When word of the local disaster reached the East Colonel Edwin Emerson Jr. wired a proposal of marriage to Miss Mary Edith Griswold of this city. Then without awaiting an answer he boarded a train and hastened to the city of ruin, anxiety for the safety of the girl he loved forbidding even the delay of an hour. Had the suitor tarried until Miss Griswold's answer reached him things might have been different, for she declined his offer in a letter that did not reach him until yesterday, just a few moments before they were married at the home of Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson on Lombard and Hyde streets.

When Emerson reached San Francisco, ignorant of the young lady's decision, he repeated the message that had been consigned to the wires and this time he won.

The wedding yesterday was a pretty and simple affair. The home in which it took place is on the brow of Russian Hill in the heart of a district of debris. A number of friends of both the young people came through streets of ashes to witness the ceremony and telegrams of congratulation came from many who could not be present, including President Roosevelt and General Shafter.

Rev. Dr. John Bakewell of Trinity Church, Oakland, performed the ceremoney. Miss Griswold was attended by her sister, Miss Ora Griswold, and the groom was attended by Edward Salisbury Field. Dr. David Starr Jordan gave the bride away. The couple will remain in this city for a short time and will then make a tour of the East. It is the intention of Mr. Emerson to locate in this city.

The groom is from New York City and has won distinction as soldier, war correspondent and lecturer. He was with Roosevelt in Cuba and did extensive work as a correspondent during the Spanish-American and Russo-Japanese wars. He received his education at Harvard and recently has been very successful throughout the country as a lecturer. At the present time he is representing the California and Century clubs of New York City in the distribution of funds raised by them.

Miss Griswold is a Californian and is well known for her literary ability. She was assistant editor of the Sunset Magazine for a number of years and has written much of worth. Her father is interested in gold mines in Ameca, Mexico.

Source: San Francisco Call, 17 May 1906, page 3.


Were Twice Married to Hold Property.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Marson this morning took out a license at the county clerk's office and were wedded shortly after. This step was taken by them to avoid any legal complications which might arise concerning their title to property in Fruitvale from a slight mistake that was made when they secured a marriage license in San Francisco in January, 1905. The husband's name is Charles H. Marson, in the former license it is given as Henry C. Marson.

Mrs. Marson is 33 years old and her husband is 31. She told Deputy County Clerk Paul Wuthe today that she is a business woman and that she did not want any trouble concerning her property rights.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 17 May 1906, page 2.


Engagement of Talented Young Lady and Prominent Oakland Physician Announced.

The announcement of the engagement of Miss Emily Chamberlain, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Chamberlain, to Dr. H. J. Lackey, son of Mrs. Lackey and the late Albert Lackey, who for so many years was closely connected with the celebrated Comstock mines of Nevada, has brought to the young people the heartiest congratulations from a wide circle of friends.

The formal announcement was to have been made at a large affair given by Mrs. Felix Galindo, sister of Miss Chamberlain, in her beautiful San Francisco home on the 25th of this month for which the cards had already been issued. The terrible fire destroyed not only the city residence, but Mr. Galindo's business as well, and the reception was, of course, cancelled. However, the happy secret is out and is promising a pleasant diversion in the afternoon's chat.

Miss Chamberlain is an attractive girl and talented. She has appeared several times in amateur casts and has won no little praise.

Dr. Lackey is one of the best known of the young physicians of this city. He is a graduate of the Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia and holds the presidency of the Alameda County Society of Physicians and Surgeons. His name is connected with the Fabiola staff of physicians and he has won an enviable place in his profession.

No date has been set for the marriage, although it is understood that it will be celebrated in the early fall.

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 17 May 1906, page 3.


Wedding Hastened by The Calamity.

Mr. Montfort Spining, son of Rev. Dr. and Mrs. George L. Spining, of South Orange, N. Y., and Miss Alice Duncan, of San Francisco, who were to have been married on May 24th, hastened their wedding by a month as a result of the earthquake.

"The earthquake shook our plans to pieces," Spining told his parents. "Alice and I concluded to fight this trouble out together, so we were married."

Source: Oakland Enquirer, 17 May 1906, page 3, photograph (Mrs. Montfort Spining).


Refugees Wed in San Jose.

SAN JOSE, May 16.—James McGowan and Edith McKarnish, San Francisco refugees, were married today by Justice of the Peace Benson. They proceeded to Los Angeles, where they will reside.

Source: San Francisco Call, 17 May 1906, page 7.


Gasoline Helps Them Wed.

After Many Trials They Are Married Now.

Bride-to-Be is Burned Out in San Francisco and it is Arranged to Have the Vows Spoken at Long Beach—Empty Naphtha Tank Almost Delays the Ceremony.

LONG BEACH, May 17.—When Miss Fannie A. Gettle and H. Butler Parker yesterday heard the closing words of the bride's grandfather, Rev. C. H. Brouillette, pronouncing them husband and wife, they drew a sigh of relief, believing that their honeymoon and wedded life had truly begun at last, after many trials and tribulations.

The bride was Miss Fannie Gettle of San Francisco and the grand-daughter of Rev. and Mrs. C. H. Brouillette of this city. The groom is H. Butler Parker of the First National Bank, and son of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Parker of this city. The plan of the young people had been to have a large and elaborate wedding at the bride's home in San Francisco, but the fire destroyed the Gettle family's home, and their belongings, including the trousseau, and so the bride came to Long Beach and decided to have the wedding here in the pretty little bungalow built by the groom on Magnolia avenue. There was hurried work yesterday completing the details and in the afternoon young Parker and Miss Gettle started in their auto for Los Angeles to secure the marriage license. This was attended to, and the happy young couple started home. Three miles from Long Beach the gasoline gave out and the time for the ceremony was near at hand.

Leaving his bride-to-be seated disconsolately in the machine, the groom struck across lots to the electric line, tipped the motorman to hurry, jumped off at the first grocery on the outskirts, grabbed a can of gasoline and caught the next car back. Then he put on the high-speed clutch, and they arrived just on time, but a little bit flustered.

After the ceremony a wedding dinner was enjoyed, but not more so than the story of the deserted bride and the frantic groom hunting for gasoline. A short wedding trip will be enjoyed, but not in the auto. Mr. and Mrs. Parker will be at home in Long Beach after June 1.

The bride is a petite brunette and the possessor of a cultivated contralto voice, which will be a welcome addition to the musical circles of Long Beach.

Source: Los Angeles Times, 18 May 1906, page II 12.


Marriage License Office Has Its Banner Month.

Number of Permits Granted Exceeded That Of Any Similar Period In History Of City.

The marriage license department of the County Clerk's office, conducted by Grant Munson at 404 Haight street, did a record-breaking business in the weeks following the great shock. From April 18 until May 18 the number of couples who sought the law's permission to marry numbered 418. The greatest number in any previous month in the history of the city numbered 400. This month was June of last year. This does not account for all the San Francisco people who entered the connubial state. Had all the residents of the city who wanted lcenses [sic.] applied at the local office their number would have been nearly 600, but a great many visited Oakland, San Jose, San Rafael and other neighboring cities.

The following marriage licenses were issued yesterday:

[see Marriages Database]

Source: San Francisco Call, 19 May 1906, page 9.


Busy Times for Cupid.

San Francisco can boast of a new record. It was a month yesterday since the calamity and the high-water mark for the issuance of marriage licenses was reached. In the month exactly 418 couples appeared before "Cupid" Munson, and, after depositing the necessary $2 and taking oath to various statements, received the requisite paper. The total is eighteen more than have ever been issued in a calendar month in the history of the city. June, 1905, set the record up to date.

Source: Sacramento Bee, 19 May 1906, page 10.


Announce Marriage.

Mr. and Mrs. William Scott Goodfellow have sent out announcement cards this week, announcing the marriage of their daughter, Marian, to Stanley Moore, on the afternoon of Saturday, the twelfth day of May, at three o'clock, Church of the Advent, East Oakland, California.

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Moore have gone on a wedding trip to Yosemite Valley, and on their return are planning to establish their own artistic home in East Oakland.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 19 May 1906, page 14.


Petalumans Are Married Again.

Reunited by the earthquake after several years of separation, George Brown, aged 44, and Georgiana Brown, aged 38, called at the County Clerk's office Thursday afternoon and procured a license to re-marry. They are both residents of Petaluma, and after the earthquake both sought refuge in Oakland. They met here, a reconciliation followed and they repaired to the Hall of Record, where Deputy County Clerk Baker issued a marriage license. The Browns were divorced in Petaluma three years ago. They told the clerk that they had agreed to let bygones be bygones and remarry immediately.

Source: Oakland Tribune, 19 May 1906, page 10.


Young Couple in the Ruins.

One of the amusing sights at the ruined City Hall in San Francisco was the sight of young couples scrambling about among the ruins trying to find where marriage licenses were issued. As they usually refused to tell anyone what they were looking for they were considerably hampered in their search.

Oakland Tribune, The Meddler, 19 May 1906, page 14.


Earthquake Ripened Love.

Calamity Makes New Record for Marriages.

Several Hundred Couples Passed by San Francisco's Wedding Clerk. Many Ceremonies Were Performed in Parks Without Proper Papers and These Must Be Done Again.

[By Direct Wire to the Times]

SAN FRANCISCO, May 19.—[Exclusive Dispatch.] San Francisco can boast of a new record. It was a month yesterday since the calamity and the high-water mark for the issuance of marriage licenses was reached. In this month exactly 418 couples appeared before "Cupid" Munson, and after depositing the necessary $2 received the requisite paper. The total is eighteen more than have ever been issued in a calendar month in the history of the city.

"Had all parties living in the city come in this office for their licenses since the earthquake," declared Munson, "we would have had more business than we could possibly attend to. The record of marriage licenses would have been somewhat more than 700."

During the excitement immediately following the calamity as many as a score of couples were wedded by ministers in parks without license papers.

"Cupid" Munson has been besieged by several ministers who officiated at these weddings for requisite papers at this late date. Munson can do nothing for them and in every case the legality of the marriage can be questioned. The only thing for these couples to do, he declared, is to procure licenses and be married all over again.

Source: Los Angeles Times, 20 May 1906, page I 1.


Weddings.

Myers-Pincus.

Mrs. E. Myers, of this city, announces the marriage of her son, Julius, to Miss Bertha Pincus, of San Francisco, Wednesday, May 16, at San Francisco.

Source: Oregonian (Portland), 20 May 1906, page 27.


Secretly Married.

RENO (Nev.), May 21.—Mrs. Ida B. Semario, who obtained a divorce on May 3d from her husband, a millionaire planter of Ecuador, was secretly married at Carson [Nevada] three days later to Paul Freygragt, of San Francisco. Both are prominent in San Francisco social circles. They left for a wedding trip in the East, and are now in St. Louis.

Source: Sacramento Bee, 21 May 1906, page 7.


Wedded in Church Ruin.

Nuptials of Notables Afford Unique Spectacle.

[By The Associated Press—P.M.]

SAN FRANCISCO, May 22—Before a temporary altar erected in the ruins of St. Dominic's Church, at Bush and Steiner streets, Miss Ethyl Kelly, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred R. Kelly of No. 2195 Devisadero street, and grand-daughter of James R. Kelly, president of the Hibernian Bank, became the bride of John Gillespie Ewing of Chicago this morning. The ceremony was performed by Father Thomas Sherman, S. J., son of Gen. Sherman and cousin of the groom.

Mr. Ewing is the son of Gen. Ewing of Ohio and the nephew of James G. Blaine. He is well known in literary circles for his scholarly contributions to the history of this country. Mr. and Mrs. Ewing will make their home in Chicago, where Mr. Ewing is engaged in the practice of law.

The wedding took place at 9 o clock. The little altar behind the dismantled church was bright with flowers and sunshine. There was no music but the twittering of birds. The friends of the bride and groom knelt on benches placed in the sand. The earthquake and fire have produced no more unique spectacle than this ceremonial al fresco, which was to have been performed in St. Dominic's Church with all the pomp of bridesmaids and nuptial music.

UNIQUELY TIES SEVEN KNOTS.

When Justice of the Peace Geary arrived at the Alameda County Clerk's office this morning in response to a telephone call to the effect that his services were wanted to unite a few couples in marriage, he found seven couples awaiting him. His advent was hailed by loud applause.

The justice led the way to County Clerk Cook's private office, the couples falling in line behind him, and walking arm in arm to the accompaniment of the Lohengrin "Wedding March," whistled by an interested audience of deputy county clerks and other spectators.

The seven ceremonies were performed in turn under a hastily improvised bower of paper wedding bells. As the couples emerged, all in double line, from the place of the marriage services they were greeted with handclapping and congratulations of the spectators, who had grouped at the door.

The couples who took park in the unique wedding ceremonies were as follows: Edward Kramer and Ida Williams, both of Vallejo; Eugene L. Scharf and Anna A. Peterson, both of Alameda; Albert M. Redwine and Anna Silva, both of Oakland; Robert Hector, Jr., of San Francisco and Louise A. Lipscott of Berkeley; Edward Fitzpatrick of San Francisco and Emma Lloyd of Ely, Nev.; Otto Kattenburg and Annie Dorr, both of Oakland, Arthur Heinz and Lizzie Sebastain, both of San Francisco.

Source: Los Angeles Times, 23 May 1906, page I 3.


Married in Ruins of Frisco Church.

Mrs. John Gillespie Ewing

Not even an earthquake, which destroyed the church in which the ceremony was to be performed, was allowed to change the wedding plans of John Gillespie Ewing, Chicago lawyer, and Miss Ethyl Kelly of San Francisco.

Preparations for the wedding, which took place on Tuesday, were begun in January. The ceremony, it was to be performed in St. Dominick's church by Father Thomas Sherman, who is a cousin of the groom. In the earthquake and fire St. Dominick's church was destroyed.

The bride and groom determined, however, that the wedding should take place as planned. On the appointed day a temporary altar was erected in the blackened ruins, and, surrounded by the members of Miss Kelly's family, the two plighted their troth.

Mr. Ewing was for several years professor of history and political economy in Notre Dame university, and subsequently came to Chicago to practice law. He is a son of Judge Ewing of Ohio and a nephew of James G. Blaine.

Until recently Mr. Ewing has resided with his sister, Mrs. E. M. Brown, at 639 Fullerton avenue.

Source: Chicago Daily Tribune, 24 May 1906, page 4, photograph.


Wants Red Cross to Act as a Marriage Bureau.

Otter Valley is a nice place in British Colombia, and bachelor ranchers there have made a combination for the purpose of marrying all the eligible maidens in San Francisco who are out of employment and in need of a husband.  Their secretary has written to Dr. Devine explaining the situation to him and asking the Red Cross to act as a marriage bureau in the interest of "Bachelors" of Otter Valley.  Here is his letter:

"OTTER VALLEY (B.C.), May 19, 1906.--Dr. Edward T. Devine: In this part of the country a great many useful young ladies could find employment.  We are a lot of ranchers and bachelors, who could make many a good girl a good home.  If you will kindly gives some of them my address I will help them to obtain work.  I am a young rancher, also a bachelor.  I have room for it a good respectable girl."

The writer's name will be furnished to applicants of honorable intentions by the executive secretary.

Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 29 May 1906, page 8.


Two Refugees Married.

Romance of the San Francisco Disaster Ends in Wedding at San Diego.

SAN DIEGO, Dec. 6.—A romance of the San Francisco disaster was closed here last evening in the marriage of J. W. Meyers and Mrs. M. Newton. Meyers, who was a refugee, came here a few months ago, settling on a ranch at Bernardo. Deciding that he ought to have a wife, he sent a letter to the Mayor of Oakland, stating his desire, to be extensively circulated. Meyers received hundreds of letters, although none of them appealed to him until the receipt of the one from Mrs. Newton, who was formerly a resident of this city. Meyers arrived from Bernardo Tuesday night and Mrs. Newton came by train from the north Wednesday morning. The meeting was satisfactory and last evening the wedding was solemnized at the home of a friend of the bride.

Source: Los Angeles Times, 07 December 1906, page II 9.


Doing Duty Wins Bride.

San Diego Guardsman Has a Romantic Wedding.

Goes North With Company After Earthquake Shock, Meets Young Woman, Woos and Now Is Married. Nine Hundred Acres Sold at Point Loma—Electric Lines Projected.

SAN DIEGO, Jan. 3—The return here of E. L. Bartlett and bride from Oakland reveals an interesting romance of the San Francisco earthquake and fire. Bartlett, who is an employee of the City Engineer's office, was a sergeant in Co. B, Seventh Regiment, National Guard. He went north with the company and was assigned to guard duty at Oakland. Miss Alva Hessick, with a party of friends, was an early visitor to the camp. It was a case of love at first sight and when the company left for San Diego Bartlett had Miss Hessick's promise to become his bride.

He went to Oakland to spend the holidays with his uncle and last Saturday he proposed that the marriage take place before his return to San Diego. Miss Hessick consented and the ceremony was performed.

Source: Los Angeles Times, 04 January 1907, page II 11.


CUPID BUSY AT EARTHQUAKE.

Courtship Begun in San Francisco's Ruins Culminates in a Wedding In This City.

Courtship begun in the smoking ruins of San Francisco at the time of the earthquake culminated last evening in the marriage of Miss Lillian Baker of that city and William L. Carr, of England, in chapel of the Young Woman's Christian association home, 288 Michigan avenue.

The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Charles Kelley of Wabash avenue Methodist Episcopal church, and was witnessed by 350 residents of the home.

Carr is 26 years old and his bride is 18. After a trip to England to visit relatives of Carr they will return to San Francisco.

Source: Chicago Daily Tribue, 05 June 1907, page 3.


Amedee Joullin Gets Married.

Two California Artists Wed Amid New Scenes.

[By Direct Wire to the Times.]

NEW YORK, June 4.—[Exclusive Dispatch.] Romance which had its origin in the San Francisco earthquake, where both persons concerned lost their belongings, has resulted in the marriage of Mrs. Lucille Willcox Hersfelder and Amedee Joullin, both well-known California artists.

They came to this city to reestablish themselves, and on May 25, they decided to make their way together amid their new surroundings. They were married by Magistrate J. M. Tierney of the second municipal court.

Amedee Joullin, for twenty years has been noted in the world of art for his characteristic pictures of the Indian tribes of the Far West and Mexico, and was called one of the handsomest men in San Francisco. He was born in San Francisco in 1862. His father was Etienne Joullin. Mr. Joullin studied in Paris at Julien's Academy, among his masters being Bouguereaux. His studio in San Francisco was one of the show places of that city.

The artist was asleep when the building in which he had his studio was shaken by the earthquake. He put on his clothes and groped his way out of the wreck. That was the last he saw of his studio, for the ruins were burned.

It was while wandering about the devastated city that he again met the talented woman, who is now his wife. They had been acquainted for several years. Mrs. Hersfelder had a studio in another part of the city, which was also destroyed. She is a painter of portraits of women and children.

Los Angeles Times, 05 June 1907, page I 3.


Fire Wedding Has Anniversary Celebrated Here.

We often hear of fire sales, fire insurance and fire loss, but we do not hear so much about fire weddings. There is a minister in the city who had what might be so termed. It occurred as a result of the San Francisco fire and at the very time the fire was burning, the bride having lost her home. The story of the event and the celebration that was held in its honor Friday night is given to us as follows:

On April 21, 1906, five years ago yesterday, Dr. Bertha Luse and Dr. Wm. Carey Bailey of San Francisco, were united in marriage by the Rev. C. Calvert Smoot. The wedding was not an elaborate affair. The bride's extensive trosseau consisted of one green suit which escaped the flames, and the groom was dressed in conventional black plus considerable brick dust, ashes and other earthquake debris. The wedding party consisted of the principals and two real estate agents in whose office the ceremony was performed. The honeymoon was spent in the service of the Red Cross looking after the sick and injured in the hospitals of San Francisco.

Yesterday was the fifth anniversary of this event and was celebrated amid more cheerful surroundings. Dr. and Mrs. Bailey held open house all afternoon and evening and were greeted by their many friends of this city. Many useful and beautiful gifts appropriate to the occasion were received, among them were a pair of elegant rocking chairs from the members and friends of the Christian Church to which the bride and groom are now ministering. Among the guests yesterday was an emergency patient who was injured by one of the falling buildings and whom the doctor called upon to attend on the day of the earthquake of April 18, '06.

Source: Oxnard Courier (Ventura Co., CA), 28 April 1911, page 3.


Romance of Great Fire Culminates in Wedding.

[By Direct Wire—Exclusive Dispatch.]

SAN FRANCISCO BUREAU OF THE TIMES, June 14.—Tonight saw a wedding as the happy culmination of an acquaintance that began in the County Jail after the stirring days of 1906, directly after the great fire of San Francisco. George W. Simmons, acquitted on September 28, together with his companions, Malcolm C. Vance and E. S. Boynton, of the killing of Heber C. Tilden on April 23, 1906, when the decedent was shot by the trio when serving on the citizens' patrol, because they thought that an automobile that he was driving was rushing away after stealing refugee supplies, married Anna M. Dyes.

While Simmons was in jail awaiting trial Miss Dyes, was one of a party to be shown through the place. She was interested in Simmons because of his youth and by reason of the notoriety attached to the crime of which he was accused. The acquaintanceship thus made was resumed after Simmons's acquittal.

The groom appears on the register of marriage licenses as being 21 years old, is chief engineer on the Standard Oil Company's ship George Loomis, and says he is the youngest chief in that service. Before taking service with the Standard Oil he was with the Luckenoach company and the Pacific Mail. Ralph W. Simmons, a brother of the groom, acted as best man, and Miss Lucille Johnson attended the bride.

Simmons is a son of Levi W. Simmons, the customs inspector, scout, Indian fighter and Civil War veteran, who was killed by an automobile at Twentieth and Valencia streets in March of last year.

Source: Los Angeles Times, 15 June 1914, page I 2.


Sequence Chain Leads to Grave.

...Mrs. Dr. Bertha Luce Bailey...passed away at her residence early Tuesday morning following an attach of heart failure. She had been a resident of Los Angeles for four years. She graduated as a physician from the California College of Osteopathy under her husband, before their marriage, and for two years was his assistant in San Francisco. Together they worked in the Red Cross service following the earthquake, and while San Francisco was still burning, April 21, 1906, the couple were married in Dr. Bailey's residence, which had survived the flames, his bride's home having burned to the ground...

Source: Los Angeles Times, 29 June 1916, page I 10.


In the Spotlight.

ASK Frances Underwood to tell her the story of her life and she will declare that nothing could be more prosaic, [yet]...the Neill company had been reorganized and she [Miss Frances Slosson] rejoined that organization, leaving it finally to become leading lady of the Bishop stock company in San Francisco. This was a delightful engagement, in no whit marred by the fact that the leading man, Franklyn Underwood, held a particular fascination for her.

Came the San Francisco earthquake, as the caption writers say. The Bishop company's leading lady found herself struggling to escape from the ruins of her home. Help finally arrived in the shape of the leading man, who had rushed with a true lover's instinct clear across the city to the home of Miss Slosson. After such a start as this, their romance was bound to grow, and six months later they were married. Frances Slosson, not being a Lucy Stoner, therefore, became known, socially and professionally, as Frances Underwood...

Source: New York Times, 27 June 1926, page X 1.


'Quake Bride Recalls Honeymoon in Ruins.

"We spent our time wandering, getting covered with soot and smoke," San Francisco's first bride during the 1906 fire recalled fifty years later.

"That was our honeymoon, instead of going to Lake Louise and Banff."

That's how Mrs. Helen D. Nichols remembers her marriage on April 19, 1906—while after-shocks from the great earthquake still rocked the city and the inferno downtown was creeping out toward Van Ness Avenue.

"We were frightened into getting married," Mrs. Nichols quoted her late husband, Charles, as saying.  "We did it because we thought we might have to leave town."

FORMS BURNED.

In the old files of the city clerk's office, there's an unofficial-appearing foolscap page recording the Nichols' hand-written affidavit applying for a marriage license.  It was used because all official forms were burned.

They got their license from Deputy County Clerk G. L. Munson, who had set up an emergency office in his home at 404 Haight Street.  Incidentally, a relative, Robert Munson, now is chief deputy county clerk.

Mrs. Nichols, interviewed the other day at her 2 Mesa Avenue home, recalled that her plans for a formal wedding with all the frills, which had been set for four days after that fateful April 18, were quickly forgotten when her family home was wrecked by the 'quake.

"Oh, my Lord, no," she said, "we couldn't even get into the house to get the gown.  I wore the same dress I had had on for two or three days."

The Nichols were married in his flat at 563 Baker Street near Fulton, overlooking the entrance to Golden Gate Park through which thousands of refugees were crowding.  Her memories of the fire and earthquake include these:

The saddening parade of refugees, "some of them carrying nothing but a birdcage."

The aimless crowds on the streets:  "We wandered as everybody else did.  You couldn't get over one before another came."

"A wedding breakfast of a bottle of beer and a box of crackers, brought by two bachelors from downtown."

The no-lamps or fire order and the stern knock of soldiers at any door where lights shown.

And the thirty refugees who crowded into a stable behind her mother's wrecked home at Golden Gate Avenue and Masonic Streets.

INSURANCE MAN.

Nichols, she recalled, then was San Francisco manager of the Fireman's Fund Insurance Company.  All of its key records were turned to black ashes inside its safe, she said, "but he had remarkable memory for details of policies when it came to untangling claims."  Nichols, who died last year, formed an insurance partnership after the fire with the late Philip Fay.

Mrs. Nichols, who was married at 22, now is a distinguished appearing gray haired woman.  As she recalled her wedding day and "the nasty black sooty ash," she said "It just doesn't seem possible that fifty years have passed."

Source: San Francisco Examiner, 15 April 1956, page III 1, photograph.


Disaster Didn't Halt Romance.

 . . . Mary Herb was a nurse assigned to a temporary hospital in Jefferson Square and Jack Fletcher was the building's manager.  "Many times," a reporter observed "when the pretty nurse was attending to sufferers, the young man found that his duties took him in her vicinity."

Result:  After having known each other but ten days, Jack and Mary were married in the hospital ward under a bower of flowers.

Source: San Francisco Examiner, 15 April 1956, Smart Set Section, page 14.


Oaklanders Defied Quake, Went Ahead and Married.

The "joint was jumping: the night the Bradford Welchs got married in West Oakland, 50 years ago tomorrow.

The wedding, performed in the home of the bride's parents at 1379 13th St., was unusual to say the least:

1—The invitations had been sent out but the guests never showed up.

2—The bride-to-be, Tillie F. Cuneo, one-half hour before the ceremony, bolted out the front door in her underclothes and had to be retrieved by her sister, Katherine, the maid of honor.

3—The bride isn't sure to this day "whether I say yes or no" when the important question was put to her by the priest.

4—Mrs. Welch does know that she took her man "for better or for worse."

THINGS WERE WORSE

And things couldn't have been worse that hour, 7:30 p.m., April 18, 1906. Everything around was in ruins and the refugees from San Francisco were streaming up from the Oakland Mole.

The day had started with a bang for the happy and nervous couple.

Welch remembers it well. He had been bedded down in the sofa of the parlor of the home of his in-laws to be.

"I was lying awake thinking about arrangements for the big day. I was looking at the garland of flowers I had helped string around the room the day before. And particularly the flower wedding bell, hanging in the center of the room.

"Suddenly the earthquake hit. I leaped up, and it was lucky I did. A big standing lamp toppled over and hit the couch right where my head had been."

His fanciful wife holds to this day "that Brad must have heard the flower bell ring to have been so prompt in rising." She "slept right through" the first jolt. But not the next. And the next.

THUNDER OF BRICKS.

Brad remembers "the thunder of the bricks from the 200-foot chimney of the Contra Costa Laundry across the street." The crash of the family chimney and that of neighbors was incidental by comparison.

"I thought those bricks from the laundry stack would never stop coming down."

Tillie become a nervous bride indeed. It was an unorthodox day for a marriage. "But we had it all arranged." So they decided to go ahead with it.

Brad's first duty was to check and see if the priest would show up. He made his way to St. Patrick's Chruch on Peralta St. to see the noted and well-loved pastor Rev. John R. McNally.

"Go ahead with the arrangements," Father McNally said, eyeing his subordinates. "If I'm not there some other bloke will be," he added with a twinkle.

And so it was. Amidst the growing confusion of the city, Brad's parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Welch, couldn't be reached in East Oakland because the telephone lines were down.

Downtown Oakland was blocked off since big cornices had toppled off Broadway buildings. Brad's brother, Clarence, had hired a team of horses for a hunting trip. So Clarence drove the party from Melrose to West Oakland, detouring around the north end of Lake Merritt.

The "guests," the relatives only, that is, began to fore-gather at the house for the evening ceremony which was set against the backdrop of the glowing sky in San Francisco. Father McNally, himself, showed up:

"I wouldn't miss this. A little earthquake can't keep me away."

Source: Oakland Tribune, 17 April 1956, page 26E, photograph.



They Married Despite Disaster.

2 Golden Weddings in Bay Area Today

To most San Franciscans the date April 18, 1906, recalls a day of catastrophe, of earthquake and fire.

But the date connotes more than that to at least two couples who built their personal histories on the still-burning ashes of the apparently doomed city.

Both couples were married on that April 18, half a century ago, and today, both will observe their golden anniversaries.

MICHAEL AND MARY

It was some days before the earthquake that two young newcomers from Ireland—Michael Lee and Mary Nihil—obtained their marriage license and planned a nuptial mass at Star of the Sea Church for the morning of the 18th.

Miss Nihil, aged 24, had come to San Francisco from her native land seven years before, and her 25-year-old fiance had been here not much longer. At the time, Lee was employed by the U.S. Customs Department.

Without immediate families here, the two felt they could face the future better if they were together.

So when morning came and with it the first convulsion that wakened the sleeping city. Michael Lee and Mary Nihil went ahead with their plans and were married by the Rev. Father Holihan.

JOSEPHINE AND WALTER

The same held true for Josephine Fratinger and Walter W. Scott.

The bride-elect and her young fiance spent the evening of April 17 decorating the Fratigner home at 817 Eddy street for their wedding the next day.

Scott, employed by a local plumbing supplies concern, bade his bride-to-be a fond farewell and took the ferry back to his home in Berkeley.

At 5:13 a.m. the first quake awakened Scott. He dashed into whatever clothing he could find and caught what proved to be the last boat back to San Francisco.

He trudged through flames to the Fratinger home and insisted upon an immediate wedding.

THE ONLY MAN

"My husband said there was no sense in waiting," Mrs. Scott recalled yesterday. "He said there were no men in my family—my mother had been a widow for years. And he felt he could suitably stay in the house with my mother and me and protect us if we were married."

So the then Miss Fratinger dressed hurriedly in the tailored suit she had worn the day before and, with a cousin, Mrs. Chase Sayre, hurried to the parish house of St. Mary's Cathedral.

"We just blew in and got married," Mrs. Scott said. "The parish house was shaking; the priest, Father Prendergast, was shaking; we were shaking."

The newlyweds remained in San Francisco only long enough to make sure that the Fratinger home was safe and then moved to Berkeley where they have lived ever since.

Until his retirement two years ago, Scott was supervisor of boat loading for the American President Lines. Childless, the Scotts make their home at 1809 Monterey avenue, Berkeley, and tonight will be guests of honor at a small family party given by Scott's brother, Dr. Marion I. Scott, at 25 Northampton avenue, Berkeley.

The last half-century has been equally pleasant for the Lees.

After their marriage, Lee joined the Fire Department and rose to the rank of captain before retiring 14 years ago. He and his wife have four children—Captain Martin M. Lee of the San Francisco Police Department; Brother James T. Lee, S.J., of Alma College in Alma, Mich.; Robert E. Lee, a San Francisco attorney who lives in Palo Alto, and Mrs. Anne M. Trapp of San Carlos, whose husband is an executive of I. Magnin & Co.

The four Lee children and ten grandchildren will join other relatives and friends in a series of observances that will begin Saturday morning with a Mass at St. Cecilia's Church.

This will be followed by a family breakfast at the Cliff House and that evening there will be a large dinner party.

The senior Lees live at 2390 30th avenue.

San Francisco Chronicle, 18 April 1956, page 3, photograph.


copyright 2005-2014 Ron Filion and Pamela Storm. All rights reserved.

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